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5.1 Using Secondary Data In Your Research
 
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If you are having troubles with your research paper, I might have a solution for you. My full course "Research Methods for Business Students" is available on Udemy. Here you can also submit YOUR questions to me and receive FEEDBACK ON YOUR PAPER! As you are my students, the course is only for 9.99 USD with following link: https://www.udemy.com/research-methods-for-business-students/?couponCode=RESEARCH_METHODS_1
Views: 3032 MeanThat
Primary and secondary data differences
 
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Distinction of primary and secondary data , meaning & effect...in a very simple way.
Views: 87493 Pranav Classes
What is Secondary Data?
 
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Secondary data is data collected by someone other than the user. visit: www.b2bwhiteboard.com
Views: 18749 B2Bwhiteboard
Understanding Primary & Secondary Sources
 
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This video describes the major characteristics of primary and secondary sources, and how they can be used in research.
Views: 159568 Imagine Easy Solutions
Secondary data analysis
 
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Views: 1970 Vidya-mitra
Rethinking Research Data | Kristin Briney | TEDxUWMilwaukee
 
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The United States spends billions of dollars every year to publicly support research that has resulted in critical innovations and new technologies. Unfortunately, the outcome of this work, published articles, only provides the story of the research and not the actual research itself. This often results in the publication of irreproducible studies or even falsified findings, and it requires significant resources to discern the good research from the bad. There is way to improve this process, however, and that is to publish both the article and the data supporting the research. Shared data helps researchers identify irreproducible results. Additionally, shared data can be reused in new ways to generate new innovations and technologies. We need researchers to “React Differently” with respect to their data to make the research process more efficient, transparent, and accountable to the public that funds them. Kristin Briney is a Data Services Librarian at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She has a PhD in physical chemistry, a Masters in library and information studies, and currently works to help researchers manage their data better. She is the author of “Data Management for Researchers” and regular blogs about data best practices at dataabinitio.com. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 7034 TEDx Talks
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Data Analysis (Module 5)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 5. Bradley EH, Curry LA, Devers K. Qualitative data analysis for health services research: Developing taxonomy, themes, and theory. Health Services Research, 2007; 42(4):1758-1772. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 168296 YaleUniversity
Primary & secondary data, meta analysis - Research Methods (7.24) Psychology AQA paper 2
 
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7.24 Primary & secondary data, meta analysis - Research Methods - AQA spec Alevel Psychology, p2 in this video definitions and evaluations of Primary Data, Secondary Data, Meta-analysis If you are a student of A-level AQA psychology I have made these videos for you! They are a full set of videos for every part of the AQA specification from 2015 onwards. They are to be used in preparation for a flipped classroom, revision, self teaching or for anyone who is just interested in psychology in general. I have attempted to make them as simple, focused and accurate as possible, 6 key points for each sub topic, (to match the 6 A01/ knowledge points in the biggest essay you will get, a 16 marker) 2 pieces of evaluative research per sub-topic (with ways to expand these to gain the 10 A03/ Evaluation points available) The channel is an on-going project in my spare time, I'm a full time Psychology A-level teacher teaching over 125 students over A1 and A2. That being said, I'm not perfect, if you spot a mistake or omission, please let me know so I can adapt the next video!
Views: 976 Psych Boost
Primary, Secondary, & Tertiary Sources
 
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Learn the differences among primary, secondary, and tertiary sources while seeing examples for each type of resource. Created by Suffolk County Community College Library, JMM, 06-2012.
Views: 39201 sccclibrary
Secondary Data Analysis
 
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Quantitative Research
Views: 2261 Dana Marsy
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 746088 Kent Löfgren
The Use of Secondary Data in a Grounded Theory Study
 
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Weaving understanding: Use of secondary data to generate new understandings about HIV risk with women in Papua New Guinea. Michelle Redman-MacLaren and Rachael Tommbe discuss the use of secondary data in a grounded theory study. Until recently, researchers have been reticent to use secondary data to generate grounded theory. Secondary data (also known as retrospective data) is data collected by other researchers and used in a separate research project to understand the phenomena under question. This conversation outlines the use of a secondary data set to inform the development of a grounded theory. Collected by researchers in a multi-site study in Papua New Guinea (PNG), the data set (qualitative and quantitative data) was theoretically sampled to explore the implications for women of male circumcision for HIV prevention. Researchers used chunks of data from the secondary data set to stimulate discussion in new focus groups and to generate new knowledge about the phenomena. The weaving of understandings from secondary and primary data has informed a grounded theory to inform HIV prevention policy and health promotion strategies in PNG.
Views: 395 NS5201JCU
Chapter 13 Secondary and Content Analysis
 
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This chapter is about unobtrusive research
Views: 2576 Qingwen Dong
Using Primary and Secondary Research | Episode 33
 
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Help us learn more about your experience by completing this short survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RRKS8LZ Subscribe to Alanis Business Academy on YouTube for updates on the latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/alanisbusinessacademy?sub_confirmation=1 Many times in business we are faced with a problem that we don't necessarily know the answer to. This often requires that we conduct some external research for the purpose of solving our problem. If you're like most people, research usually entails conducting a quick google search to find the answer. Unfortunately this may not yield accurate or valid infomration. In this video I'll introduce you to the two methods of research and provide a description of what each method entails. After viewing this video you should having a more clear idea of what's involved in the research process and also what tools you have available. Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/1hNcJ2k
C2: Secondary Qualitative Data
 
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A sociology screencast examining the use of secondary qualitative data (documents) in research for component two of the eduqas A level.
Views: 938 Steve Bassett
Module Two: Secondary Market Research for Industry Analysis
 
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Understanding an industry is a critical success factor being successful within it, but the importance of an industry analysis can be often overlooked. This module covers the types of industry information, common industry research scope, and introduces a few starting places to gather industry information. Visit the Small Business Accelerator www.sba.ubc.ca
Sociology Research Methods: Crash Course Sociology #4
 
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Today we’re talking about how we actually DO sociology. Nicole explains the research method: form a question and a hypothesis, collect data, and analyze that data to contribute to our theories about society. Crash Course is made with Adobe Creative Cloud. Get a free trial here: https://www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html *** The Dress via Wired: https://www.wired.com/2015/02/science-one-agrees-color-dress/ Original: http://swiked.tumblr.com/post/112073818575/guys-please-help-me-is-this-dress-white-and *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Les Aker, Robert Kunz, William McGraw, Jeffrey Thompson, Jason A Saslow, Rizwan Kassim, Eric Prestemon, Malcolm Callis, Steve Marshall, Advait Shinde, Rachel Bright, Kyle Anderson, Ian Dundore, Tim Curwick, Ken Penttinen, Caleb Weeks, Kathrin Janßen, Nathan Taylor, Yana Leonor, Andrei Krishkevich, Brian Thomas Gossett, Chris Peters, Kathy & Tim Philip, Mayumi Maeda, Eric Kitchen, SR Foxley, Justin Zingsheim, Andrea Bareis, Moritz Schmidt, Bader AlGhamdi, Jessica Wode, Daniel Baulig, Jirat -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 389467 CrashCourse
What is COMPARATIVE RESEARCH? What does COMPARATIVE RESEARCH mean? COMPARATIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is COMPARATIVE RESEARCH? What does COMPARATIVE RESEARCH mean? COMPARATIVE RESEARCH meaning - COMPARATIVE RESEARCH definition - COMPARATIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures. A major problem in comparative research is that the data sets in different countries may not use the same categories, or define categories differently (for example by using different definitions of poverty). Comparative research, simply put, is the act of comparing two or more things with a view to discovering something about one or all of the things being compared. This technique often utilizes multiple disciplines in one study. When it comes to method, the majority agreement is that there is no methodology peculiar to comparative research. The multidisciplinary approach is good for the flexibility it offers, yet comparative programs do have a case to answer against the call that their research lacks a "seamless whole." There are certainly methods that are far more common than others in comparative studies, however. Quantitative analysis is much more frequently pursued than qualitative, and this is seen by the majority of comparative studies which use quantitative data. The general method of comparing things is the same for comparative research as it is in our everyday practice of comparison. Like cases are treated alike, and different cases are treated differently; the extent of difference determines how differently cases are to be treated. If one is able to sufficiently distinguish two carry the research conclusions will not be very helpful. Secondary analysis of quantitative data is relatively widespread in comparative research, undoubtedly in part because of the cost of obtaining primary data for such large things as a country's policy environment. This study is generally aggregate data analysis. Comparing large quantities of data (especially government sourced) is prevalent. A typical method of comparing welfare states is to take balance of their levels of spending on social welfare. In line with how a lot of theorizing has gone in the last century, comparative research does not tend to investigate "grand theories," such as Marxism. It instead occupies itself with middle-range theories that do not purport to describe our social system in its entirety, but a subset of it. A good example of this is the common research program that looks for differences between two or more social systems, then looks at these differences in relation to some other variable coexisting in those societies to see if it is related. The classic case of this is Esping-Andersen's research on social welfare systems. He noticed there was a difference in types of social welfare systems, and compared them based on their level of decommodification of social welfare goods. He found that he was able to class welfare states into three types, based on their level of decommodification. He further theorized from this that decommodification was based on a combination of class coalitions and mobilization, and regime legacy. Here, Esping-Andersen is using comparative research: he takes many western countries and compares their level of decommodification, then develops a theory of the divergence based on his findings. Comparative research can take many forms. Two key factors are space and time. Spatially, cross-national comparisons are by far the most common, although comparisons within countries, contrasting different areas, cultures or governments also subsist and are very constructive, especially in a country like New Zealand, where policy often changes depending on which race it pertains to. Recurrent interregional studies include comparing similar or different countries or sets of countries, comparing one's own country to others or to the whole world....
Views: 5831 The Audiopedia
International Civic and Citizenship Studies data for secondary analysis: webinar with ICPSR
 
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IEA is proud to partner with The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) by releasing our ICCS 2009 & 2016 data on the CivicLEADS archive. In this webinar hosted by David Bleckley (ICPSR), Ralph Carstens and Falk Brese from IEA discuss what can be learned from ICCS and how to work with these rich data sets.
Views: 60 IEA Education
Primary vs Secondary Sources
 
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Primary vs Secondary Sources-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 474826 Rob Redmon
What is action research?
 
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Here's a short description of action research. TRANSCRIPT: Teaching is a craft. It’s both an art and a science, which is why great teachers always experiment and make tons of mistakes. But how do you know what’s actually working? One option is action research. Here you can identify a question or problem, test out a strategy, gather data, and determine if it works. The end result is something dynamic, innovative, and tied directly to your classroom. Action research dissolves the barrier between participants and researchers. In other words, the teacher actively participates in the situation while conducting the research. There are many action research frameworks, but they generally follow a similar process: You start out in phase one, planning for research. Phase One: Planning for Research It starts with an inquiry process, where you define a specific research question. It needs to be something you can actually test. Next, you conduct a literature review to gain a deeper understanding of the related research. Finally, you move into the design process, where you determine your data methods, consider ethical issues, get required permissions, create deadlines and set up systems. This is where you engage in multiple cycles of experimentation and data collection. Your data collection might include qualitative data, like observations, artifacts, and interviews or quantitative data like rubric scores, surveys, or achievement data. Phase Three: Analysis You will often start by organizing data with charts or graphs and looking for trends. You might also discuss it with peers, free write in a journal, or create a cluster map before eventually writing out your results. Phase Four: Conclusion This is often where you share your research with the world and reflect on your own practice. This will ultimately lead to new questions . . . and the cycle will continue again as you refine your craft as a better, more creative teacher.
Views: 129513 John Spencer
Data Collection & Analysis
 
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Impact evaluations need to go beyond assessing the size of the effects (i.e., the average impact) to identify for whom and in what ways a programme or policy has been successful. This video provides an overview of the issues involved in choosing and using data collection and analysis methods for impact evaluations
Views: 60683 UNICEF Innocenti
Content Analysis
 
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Let's go on a journey and learn how to perform a content analysis!
Views: 107613 ChrisFlipp
Qualitative & Quantitative Research - An Introduction
 
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An introduction to the subjects of Qualitative and Quantitative research. When organisations enter into strategic planning, they often conduct different types of relevant research and analyses enabling them to make informed, strategic decisions. Parts of this process might include conducting qualitative and/or quantitative research, which is what this video aims to explain and exemplify. This video is aimed at marketing management students.
Views: 76043 Tine Wade
3.4 Different sources of secondary data
 
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Internal secondary data includes: sales force records; transactions; competitor activity; customer records; inventory records; cost of transport; previous research; website visitor records. External secondary data includes government output, academic knowledge and company reports. Professional associations publish industry overviews. Market research report publishers have reports on different market sectors. Geodemographic companies produce data from the census combined with other databases. There are also consumer-generated media (CGM). http://www.oxfordtextbooks.co.uk/orc/bradley2e
Views: 9231 MarketResearchVideos
Data Collection Methods
 
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This video was completed as part of a Masters project in DCU. It is the Introduction to a series of videos on Data Collection Methods
Views: 101031 Scott Crombie
3.7 Research Strategy: Case Study
 
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If you are having troubles with your research paper, I might have a solution for you. My full course "Research Methods for Business Students" is available on Udemy. Here you can also submit YOUR questions to me and receive FEEDBACK ON YOUR PAPER! As you are my students, the course is only for 9.99 USD with following link: https://www.udemy.com/research-methods-for-business-students/?couponCode=RESEARCH_METHODS_1
Views: 75459 MeanThat
Using Large Scale Assessment Data for Secondary Analysis, Andres Sandoval-Hernandez, IEA DPC
 
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Andres Sandoval-Hernandez, IEA DPC Using Large Scale Assessment Data for Secondary Analysis Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Cognitive Studies (ICACS)
IPPCR 2015: Secondary Data/Meta-Analysis
 
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Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research (IPPCR) 2015: Secondary Data/Meta-Analysis Air date: Tuesday, December 08, 2015, 5:00:00 PM Category: IPPCR Runtime: 00:53:33 Description: The Introduction to the Principles and Practice of Clinical Research (IPPCR) is a course to train participants on how to effectively conduct clinical research. The course focuses on the spectrum of clinical research and the research process by highlighting epidemiologic methods, study design, protocol preparation, patient monitoring, quality assurance, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issues. For more information go to http://clinicalcenter.nih.gov/training/training/ippcr1.html Author: Charles Natanson, M.D., NIH Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?19374
Views: 3595 nihvcast
An introduction to the basics of Research Data
 
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An animated video explaining the basics of research data. This video is recommended background material for students planning to attend a workshop on research data management. Feedback from previous workshops have indicated that many workshop attendees do not have a clear concept of what research data entails, and have no experience of working with research data. This animated video has as its purpose the explanation of the basics of research data, in a simplistic, entertaining and interesting manner. It is hoped that the information contained in the video will better prepare research data novices for a future research data management course/workshop.
Views: 9903 Louise Patterton
What is the difference between primary and secondary sources?
 
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Understand the difference between primary and secondary sources in History. Learn more: https://www.historyskills.com/source-criticism/analysis/source-kind-and-type/
Views: 887 History Skills
Major Research Methods
 
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Brief overview of the four major research methods: surveys, observation, experiments, and secondary analysis
Views: 30689 Debra Marshall
Primary & Secondary Data Analysis for MBA/MA Dissertation
 
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The primary data entails new information which can be collected from the market or company or particular source. The secondary data contains information which is already existed in the form of agency reports, statistical information, government publications, sales reports, journals, electronic publications, previous thesis works, academic publications and other published or existing information.
Views: 2095 MBA Help24
What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH definition - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Unobtrusive research (or unobtrusive measures) is a method of data collection used primarily in the social sciences. The term "unobtrusive measures" was first coined by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, & Sechrest in a 1966 book titled Unobtrusive Measures: nonreactive research in the social sciences. The authors described methodologies which do not involve direct elicitation of data from the research subjects. Unobtrusive measures are contrasted with interviews and questionnaires, in that they try to find indirect ways to obtain the necessary data. The unobtrusive approach often seeks unusual data sources, such as garbage, graffiti and obituaries, as well as more conventional ones such as published statistics. Unobtrusive measures should not be perceived as an alternative to more reactive methods such as interviews, surveys and experiments, but rather as an additional tool in the tool chest of the social researcher. Unobtrusive measures can assist in tackling known biases such as selection bias and experimenter's bias. Webb and his colleagues emphasize the importance of triangulating the results obtained through various methodologies, each with its own unique set of (usually unknown) biases. The proliferation of digital media opened a new era for communication researchers in search of unobtrusively obtained data sources. Online communication creates digital footprints that can allow an analysis of data that are obtained through unobtrusive methods, and are also massively larger than any corpora obtained via elicitation and human transcription. These footprints can now be used to analyze topics such as the content of communication events, the process of communication, and the structure of the communicative network. The surge of Internet-sourced research data rekindled the discussion of the ethical aspects of using unobtrusively obtained data. For example, can all data collected in the public domain be used for research purposes? When should we seek consent, and is it realistic to require informed consent from sources of unobtrusively collected data? These questions do not have a simple answer, and the solution is a result of a careful and ongoing dialog between researchers, and between researchers and society.
Views: 1588 The Audiopedia
How to analyze your data and write an analysis chapter.
 
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In this video Dr. Ziene Mottiar, DIT, discusses issues around analyzing data and writing the analysing chapter. The difference between Findings and Analysis chapters is also discussed. This video is useful for anyone who is writing a dissertation or thesis.
Views: 68057 ZieneMottiar
Unlocking The Potential of Secondary Data
 
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Dr Emma Smith from the University of Birmingham talks about building research capacity among students in the field of education. This talk was given at the ESDS International 6th Annual Conference held in London in November 2010. Information about the conference and slides from the presentation are available from http://www.esds.ac.uk/international/news/conf2010.asp
Views: 591 ESDSInternational
Quantitative and Qualitative Research
 
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This video describes and compares the characteristics of quantitative and qualitative research in counseling.
Views: 24924 Dr. Todd Grande
Team 4 Secondary Analysis
 
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Secondary Analysis on the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Views: 5 Matthew Sasaki
Research Methodology Meaning Types Objectives [Hindi]
 
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Methodology is the systematic, theoretical analysis of the methods applied to a field of study. A research method is a systematic plan for conducting research. Sociologists draw on a variety of both qualitative and quantitative research methods, including experiments, survey research, participant observation, and secondary data.
Views: 151044 Manager Sahab
Research Minute: Primary vs. Secondary Sources
 
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What's the difference between primary and secondary sources? Watch this Research Minute Video to find out!
Views: 8924 Jessup Library
Data Analysis in SPSS Made Easy
 
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Use simple data analysis techniques in SPSS to analyze survey questions.
Views: 844853 Claus Ebster
The Joy of Secondary Data Analysis
 
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(2-15-19 Colloquium) By: Lynette Hammond Gerido
Views: 79 The iSchoolatFSU
Primary vs. Secondary Sources: What's the Difference?
 
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Do you need to use primary or secondary resources for your research papers? In this video, staff in Outreach, Learning, and Research explain the difference between them.
Views: 467 RCLibraries
Primary and Secondary Sources Short Tutorial
 
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This video gives a brief description of primary and secondary sources, how to identify them, and where to search for them.-- Created using PowToon
Views: 62043 Jessica O'Brien
Research Data
 
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There are some simple ways to share your research data, including features that are directly available when you submit your research article to an Elsevier journal. These ensure you receive credit for your work, while making your research data accessible, giving your readers deeper insights and supporting their work. Find out more: https://www.elsevier.com/authors/author-services/research-data Animation by Bruno van Wayenburg
Views: 13131 Elsevier Journals
Editing Primary Aliases with a Secondary Data Source
 
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In this week's #TableauTipTuesday, Lorna shows you how to update all of your aliases in your primary data source at once with a secondary data source. You can download the workbook on Lorna’s blog. https://missdataviz.wordpress.com/2019/02/06/tableautiptuesday-week-5-editing-primary-aliases/
Views: 831 Andy Kriebel

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