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Introduction to Sociology - Political Economy
 
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Harvey Molotch Introduction to Sociology
Views: 17858 New York University
The Third Industrial Revolution: A Radical New Sharing Economy
 
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The global economy is in crisis. The exponential exhaustion of natural resources, declining productivity, slow growth, rising unemployment, and steep inequality, forces us to rethink our economic models. Where do we go from here? In this feature-length documentary, social and economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin lays out a road map to usher in a new economic system. A Third Industrial Revolution is unfolding with the convergence of three pivotal technologies: an ultra-fast 5G communication internet, a renewable energy internet, and a driverless mobility internet, all connected to the Internet of Things embedded across society and the environment. This 21st century smart digital infrastructure is giving rise to a radical new sharing economy that is transforming the way we manage, power and move economic life. But with climate change now ravaging the planet, it needs to happen fast. Change of this magnitude requires political will and a profound ideological shift. To learn more visit: https://impact.vice.com/thethirdindustrialrevolution Click here to subscribe to VICE: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideo Click here to get the best of VICE daily: http://bit.ly/1SquZ6v Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/vice Download VICE on iOS: http://apple.co/28Vgmqz Download VICE on Android: http://bit.ly/28S8Et0
Views: 3050857 VICE
Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14
 
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We talk a lot about Keynesian economics on this show, pretty much because the real world currently runs on Keynesian principles. That said, there are some other economic ideas out there, and today we're going to talk about a few of them. So, if you've been aching to hear about socialism, communism, the Chicago School, or the Austrian School, this episode is for you. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 782943 CrashCourse
KFAS - Economic Complexity & Secrets of Economic Growth
 
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Prof. Ricardo Hausmann’s lecture on the Economic Complexity & Secrets of Economic growth by Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science
Economic Growth, Climate Change and Environmental Limits
 
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Debate about the relationship between environmental limits and economic growth has been taking place for several decades. These arguments have re-emerged with greater intensity following advances in the understanding of the economics of climate change, increases in resource and oil prices and the re-emergence of the discussion about peak oil. These issues are addressed here by Cameron Hepburn, He is Professor of environmental economics at the University of Oxford, based at the Smith School and the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, and is also Professorial Research Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics and a Fellow of New College, Oxford. According to Professor Hepburn, the economic pessimism created by the great recession of 2008-2012 has put the spotlight back on the prospects for economic growth and invariably, the impact on the impact and climate change. But does the pursuit of growth necessitate a trade-off with the environment. In the interview ,Hepburn offers a conceptual and synthetic analysis of the relationship between economic growth and environmental limits, including those imposed by climate change. It explores two related questions. Will environmental limits, including limits on the climate system, slow or even halt economic growth? If not, how will the nature of economic growth have to shift? To be clear, Cameron Hepburn does not envisage a ‘zero growth’ world as being necessary for us to live within environmental limits, nor does he see economic growth as a problem. Rather, he maintains that stopping economic growth (which is measured in terms of value) is neither necessary nor desirable. Indeed, as far as meeting environmental challenges is concerned, it would be counterproductive; recessions have slowed and in some cases derailed efforts to adopt cleaner modes of production. Rather, large leaps in clean technology, triggering a structural shift in the way we produce and consume energy, are required. This is a ‘green growth’ rather than a ‘no growth’ world. The continuation of growth in value to humans is consistent with us living within the material constraints imposed by a finite (if very large) planet, provided that we continue to expand the "intellectual economy" through innovation, technology development, an increased focus on services and, more fundamentally, the art of living, all of which he discusses in the interview below.
Views: 8033 New Economic Thinking
Europe: What Is Needed for Economic Growth?
 
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Jan. 6 -- Oppenheimer Funds Vice President Alessio De Longis and Bloomberg's Simon Kennedy discuss the current economic state in Europe and what is needed to resuscitate growth. -- Subscribe to Bloomberg on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/Bloomberg Bloomberg Television offers extensive coverage and analysis of international business news and stories of global importance. It is available in more than 310 million households worldwide and reaches the most affluent and influential viewers in terms of household income, asset value and education levels. With production hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong, the network provides 24-hour continuous coverage of the people, companies and ideas that move the markets.
Views: 1734 Bloomberg
Daron Acemoglu: Institutional Impacts on Economic Growth and Improved Living Standards
 
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MIT Economics Professor Daronn Acemoglu discusses impact of inequality in wealth and opportunity. RELATED STORY: http://ilp.mit.edu/newsstory.jsp?id=18635
An Economic History of the World Since 1400 | Self-Interest, Survival, and History The Great Courses
 
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Learn more about this course and sign up for a FREE trial of The Great Courses Plus here: https://www.TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/show/an_economic_history_of_the_world_since_1400?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=149570 Economics has, in many regards, created the world. Not only is it the process through which societies provide for the well-being of their citizens, it has also driven everything from trade and politics to warfare and diplomacy. In fact, there’s not a single aspect of history that has not, in some way, been influenced by economic practices. Most of us, even those savvy at following today’s market fluctuations, have a limited understanding of the powerful role economics has played in shaping human civilization. This makes economic history—the study of how civilizations have structured their environments in order to provide food, shelter, and material goods—a vital lens through which to think about how we arrived at our present, globalized moment. It’s also a way to educate yourself about the history behind today’s (and tomorrow’s) economic headlines, from trade negotiations to job outsourcing to financial miracles. Learn more about this course and sign up for a FREE trial of The Great Courses Plus here: https://www.TheGreatCoursesPlus.com/show/an_economic_history_of_the_world_since_1400?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=149570 Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel – we are adding new videos all the time! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TheGreatCourses
Views: 59788 The Great Courses Plus
Demystifying the Chinese Economy
 
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Speaker: Professor Justin Lin Chair: Professor Danny Quah Recorded on 18 December 2012 in Old Theatre, Old Building. As a result of the miraculous growth since the market-oriented reform in 1979, China's status in the global economy has dramatically changed. This speech will reflect on China's unprecedented growth in the past 32 years, examine the reasons of that growth, and discuss prospects and challenges for China to maintain an eight-percent annual growth rate in the coming decades. Justin Yifu Lin is the former World Bank chief economist and senior vice president, development economics. Lin is the founder and first director of the China Center for Economic Research and a former professor of economics at Peking University and at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Justin Lin is to receive an Honorary Degree from LSE -- Doctor of Science (Economics).
Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6
 
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Why are some countries rich? Why are some countries poor? In the end it comes down to Productivity. This week on Crash Course Econ, Adriene and Jacob investigate just why some economies are more productive than others, and what happens when an economy is mor productive. We'll look at how things like per capita GDP translate to the lifestyle of normal people. And, there's a mystery. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 837841 CrashCourse
Michael Spence  — The Future of Economic Growth
 
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A fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of economics at New York University Stern School of Business, Michael Spence won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 2001. His latest book is The Next Convergence: The Future of Economic Growth in a Multi-Speed World. Around 1750 the world economy began its amazing transformation with the advent of the Industrial Revolution. What happened then and why did it happen? The short answer, according to Michael Spence is "innovation." But where does innovation come from? Spence traces the emergence of the global economy, marking the critical interaction of economics and governance in successful economies in the developing world. He focuses on China and India as emerging economic powers and what their rise will mean for the United States.
Views: 19122 HooverInstitution
Puzzle of Growth: Rich Countries and Poor Countries
 
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Throughout this section of the course, we’ve been trying to solve a complicated economic puzzle—why are some countries rich and others poor? There are various factors at play, interacting in a dynamic, and changing environment. And the final answer to the puzzle differs depending on the perspective you're looking from. In this video, you'll examine different pieces of the wealth puzzle, and learn about how they fit. The first piece of the puzzle, is about productivity. You'll learn how physical capital, human capital, technological knowledge, and entrepreneurs all fit together to spur higher productivity in a population. From this perspective, you'll see economic growth as a function of a country's factors of production. You’ll also learn what investments can be made to improve and increase these production factors. Still, even that is too simplistic to explain everything. So we'll also introduce you to another piece of the puzzle: incentives. In previous videos, you learned about the incentives presented by different economic, cultural, and political models. In this video, we'll stay on that track, showing how different incentives produce different results. As an example, you'll learn why something as simple as agriculture isn't nearly so simple at all. We'll put you in the shoes of a hypothetical farmer, for a bit. In those shoes, you'll see how incentives can mean the difference between getting to keep a whole bag of potatoes from your farm, or just a hundredth of a bag from a collective farm. (Trust us, the potatoes explain a lot.) Potatoes aside, you're also going to see how different incentives shaped China's economic landscape during the “Great Leap Forward” of the 1950s and 60s. With incentives as a lens, you'll see why China's supposed leap forward ended in starvation for tens of millions. Hold on—incentives still aren’t the end of it. After all, incentives have to come from somewhere. That “somewhere” is institutions. As we showed you before, institutions dictate incentives. Things like property rights, cultural norms, honest governments, dependable laws, and political stability, all create incentives of different kinds. Remember our hypothetical farmer? Through that farmer, you'll learn how different institutions affect all of us. You'll see how institutions help dictate how hard a person works, and how likely he or she is to invest in the economy, beyond that work. Then, once you understand the full effect of institutions, you'll go beyond that, to the final piece of the wealth puzzle. And it's the most mysterious piece, too. Why? Because the final piece of the puzzle is the amorphous combination of a country’s history, ideas, culture, geography, and even a little luck. These things aren't as direct as the previous pieces, but they matter all the same. You'll see why the US constitution is the way it is, and you'll learn about people like Adam Smith and John Locke, whose ideas helped inform it. And if all this talk of pieces makes you think that the wealth puzzle is a complex one, you’d be right. Because the truth is, the question of “what creates wealth?” really is complex. Even the puzzle pieces you'll learn about don't constitute every variable at play. And as we mentioned earlier, not only are the factors complex, but they're also constantly changing as they bump against each other. Luckily, while the quest to finish the wealth puzzle isn’t over, at least we have some of the pieces in hand. So take the time to dive in and listen to this video and let us know if you have questions along the way. After that, we'll soon head into a new section of the course: we’ll tackle the factors of production so we can further explore what leads to economic growth. Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1QEPrQ3 Next video: http://bit.ly/1WJe2Bw Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/HrHZ/
Marx's Theory of Economic Crisis
 
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A short explanation of why the world economy is in a mess, from Karl Marx. Read by me, Cliff Bowman.
Views: 163014 CliffBowman
Global Economic Outlook: A View from Asia
 
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Global economic growth is soaring by nearly 4% (IMF) but rising US interest rates, high levels of debt from the low-rate era and trade skirmishes cast a shadow on the outlook. How will economic leaders navigate the new context? Speakers: - Lutfey Siddiqi, Visiting Professor-in-Practice, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom; Young Global Leader. - Arun Sundararajan, Robert and Dale Atkins Rosen Professor of Business, Stern School of Business, New York University, USA. - Jing Ulrich, Managing Director and Vice-Chairman, Asia-Pacific, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Hong Kong SAR, China. - Wang Tuanwei, Chief Financial Officer and Vice-President, China. - Minsheng Investment Group, People's Republic of China. Moderated by: - Martin Soong, Anchor, CNBC Asia, Singapore. http://www.weforum.org/
Views: 1127 World Economic Forum
Asia Economic Outlook
 
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Fed tightening, rising debt levels and political uncertainty are casting a shadow on the outlook for strong global growth. How can business and policy-makers best manage these challenges to deliver inclusive growth? Dimensions to be addressed: - Dollar strengthening - Demographic challenges and debt dynamics - Trade tensions - Judy Hsu, Regional Chief Executive Officer, ASEAN and South Asia, Standard Chartered Bank, United Kingdom - Sri Mulyani Indrawati, Minister of Finance of Indonesia - Nazir Razak, Chairman, CIMB Group Holdings, Malaysia - Veerathai Santiprabhob, Governor of the Bank of Thailand - Kevin Sneader, Global Managing Partner, McKinsey & Company, Hong Kong SAR, China Moderated by - Haslinda Amin, Chief International Correspondent, South-East Asia, Bloomberg News, Singapore http://www.weforum.org/
Views: 11972 World Economic Forum
Is corporate debt a major risk to the economy?
 
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First Trust Advisors' Brian Wesbury and Bruderman Brothers' Oliver Pursche discuss whether there is a corporate debt problem and how it could affect the U.S. economy.
Views: 4103 CNBC Television
PS. In Theory: Economic Growth
 
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Economic growth is a central concern for all societies. On one hand, unbridled growth poses serious environmental risks. On the other hand, rising incomes are a foundation of social and political stability. But because people and resources are finite, income growth depends largely on improvements in productivity, and that has been almost stagnant across most economies and sectors for a decade. Keep up to date with PS films by subscribing to our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/project-syndicate ******************************************************************** For more PS, join the conversation on... Our website: www.prosyn.org Facebook: www.facebook.com/projectsyndicate Twitter: www.twitter.com/prosyn SoundCloud: www.soundcloud.com/projectsyndicate
Views: 3812 Project Syndicate
Gilded Age Politics:Crash Course US History #26
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps keep the channel producing great content. In which John Green teaches you about the Gilded Age and its politics. What, you may ask, is the Gilded Age? The term comes from a book by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner titled, "The Gilded Age." You may see a pattern emerging here. It started in the 1870s and continued on until the turn of the 20th century. The era is called Gilded because of the massive inequality that existed in the United States. Gilded Age politics were marked by a number of phenomenons, most of them having to do with corruption. On the local and state level, political machines wielded enormous power. John gets into details about the most famous political machine, Tammany Hall. Tammany Hall ran New York City for a long, long time, notably under Boss Tweed. Graft, kickbacks, and voter fraud were rampant, but not just at the local level. Ulysses S. Grant ran one of the most scandalous presidential administrations in U.S. history, and John will tell you about two of the best known scandals, the Credit Mobilier scandal and the Whiskey Ring. There were a few attempts at reform during this time, notably the Civil Service Act of 1883 and the Sherman Anti-trust act of 1890. John will also get into the Grange Movement of the western farmers, and the Populist Party that arose from that movement. The Populists, who threw in their lot with William Jennings Bryan, never managed to get it together and win a presidency, and they faded after 1896. Which brings us to the Progressive Era, which we'll get into next week! Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. The Gilded Age was marked by the success of the richest coupled with inequality and corruption. Repeated factory disasters, such as the triangle shirtwaist factory fire revealed the unsafe working conditions of the urban poor: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-triangle-shirtwaist-factory-fire Meanwhile, workers began to join unions and strike for better working conditions: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-coeur-d-alene-miners-uprising Like us: facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow Us! @TheCrashCourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @br8dybrunch
Views: 1847278 CrashCourse
The Industrial Economy: Crash Course US History #23
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Industrial Economy that arose in the United States after the Civil War. You know how when you're studying history, and you're reading along and everything seems safely in the past, and then BOOM you think, "Man, this suddenly seems very modern." For me, that moment in US History is the post-Reconstruction expansion of industrialism in America. After the Civil War, many of the changes in technology and ideas gave rise to this new industrialism. You'll learn about the rise of Captains of Industry (or Robber Barons) like Cornelius Vanderbilt, Andrew Carnegie, John D Rockefeller, and JP Morgan. You'll learn about trusts, combinations, and how the government responded to these new business practices. All this, plus John will cover how workers reacted to the changes in society and the early days of the labor movement. You'll learn about the Knights of Labor and Terence Powderly, and Samuel Gompers and the AFL. As a special bonus, someone gets beaten with a cane. AGAIN. What is it with American History and people getting beaten with canes? Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 1854636 CrashCourse
Political Compromises Are Needed to Boost Growth
 
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Campaign rhetoric can obscure as much as enlighten the country's real problems, and so it is with the economic debate of 2012. The real problem is that America's economy simply isn't the high-growth machine it once was, and won't be unless Washington breaks the policy gridlock weighing down the economic machine. Jerry Seib explains on The News Hub. Subscribe to WSJ Live HERE: http://bit.ly/Kpz7Ab WSJ Live brings you original programming from The Wall Street Journal.  Get news directly from The Wall Street Journal's 2,000 reporters across the globe.  With exclusive video and daily live programming, you can stay on top of the latest in news, elections, markets, tech, opinion and lifestyle. Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 144 Wall Street Journal
The Rise and Fall of American Growth
 
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Date: Wednesday 11 May 2016 Time: 6.30-8pm Venue: Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building Speaker: Professor Robert J Gordon Chair: Professor Wouter Den Haan Professor Gordon will examine the history of economic growth in the USA, and explore solutions needed to overcome the economic challenges of the future. Robert J Gordon is the Stanley G Harris Professor in the Social Sciences at Northwestern University and author of The Rise and Fall of American Growth: The U.S. Standard of Living since the Civil War. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2014 he was elected as a Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association in recognition of a long career of outstanding contributions to scholarship, teaching, public service, and the economics profession. For more than three decades, he has been a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research's Business Cycle Dating Committee, which determines the start and end dates for recessions in the United States. Wouter Den Haan is Professor of Economics at LSE and Co-Director of the Centre for Macroeconomics. The Department of Economics at LSE (@LSEEcon) is one of the largest economics departments in the world. Its size ensures that all areas of economics are strongly represented in both research and teaching. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) brings together world-class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and to help design policies that alleviate it.
Hedge Fund Legend Ray Dalio On The Economy
 
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Ray Dalio is the founder and co-chief investment officer of Bridgewater Associates, the largest hedge fund in the world. Dalio is sharing his template for understanding debt crises, which he says helped him and his fund foresee and navigate the financial crisis. ------------------------------------------------------ Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/ BI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/businessinsider/ BI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/businessinsider/ BI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider --------------------------------------------------
Views: 681429 Business Insider
What lies ahead for the Indian economy?
 
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India has one of the world's largest economies, but growth for the advancing country has slowed to less than 5 percent a year since 2011. With the value of the rupee dropping and inflation surging, how is India's central bank prepared to cope? Hari Sreenivasan interviews Raghuran Rajan, governor of the Reserve Bank of India.
Views: 38432 PBS NewsHour
Germany enjoys strong economic growth in Q1 - economy
 
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Gross domestic product in Germany picked up in the first three months of this year. Europe's biggest economy grew by 0.6 percent between January and March compared to the previous quarter. That improvement came from companies investing more, particularly in equipment and construction of buildings, helped by mild winter weather. In addition consumers and the government continued to spend and exports soared. The latest numbers are good news for Chancellor Angela Merkel ahead of September's f… READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2017/05/12/german-enjoys-strong-economic-growth-in-q1 euronews business brings you latest updates from the world of finance and economy, in-depth analysis, interviews, infographics and more Subscribe for daily dose of business news: http://bit.ly/1pcHCzj Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
Views: 738 euronews Business
The Real Adam Smith: Ideas That Changed The World - Full Video
 
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The Real Adam Smith: A Personal Exploration by Johan Norberg, takes an intriguing, two-part look at Smith and the evolution and relevance of his ideas today, both economic and ethical. It’s difficult to imagine that a man who lived with horse drawn carriages and sailing ships would foresee our massive 21st century global market exchange, much less the relationship between markets and morality. But Adam Smith was no ordinary 18th century figure. Considered the “father of modern economics,” Smith was first and foremost a moral philosopher. The revolutionary ideas he penned in The Wealth of Nations and The Theory of Moral Sentiments, changed the world. Norberg explores Smith’s insights regarding free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are thriving and driving the world’s economy. In the second hour, Ideas That Changed The World, Norberg traces Smith’s insights regarding the benefits of free trade and the nature of wealth to the present, where they are currently in operation. He talks with some of the most distinguished Adam Smith scholars, as well as leaders of some of the world’s most admired companies to discover how Smith’s ideas continue to be relevant and drive the global economy today. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv Learn more about Adam Smith here: http://therealadamsmithfilm.com
Views: 373095 Free To Choose Network
Growth Machine Theory
 
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Informative Speech for UTEP Communications class
Views: 237 Armando Perez
The Politics and Economics of Inequality
 
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Some inequality of income and wealth is inevitable, if not necessary. If an economy is to function well, people need incentives to work hard and innovate. The pertinent question is not whether income and wealth inequality is good or bad. It is at what point do these inequalities become so great as to pose a serious threat to our economy, our ideal of equal opportunity and our democracy. Professor Robert Reich examines what's happened to income and wealth in this country, why it's a problem, and what we can expect in future years.
Views: 38884 The Aspen Institute
Is the Party Over for Economic Growth? When economic stagnation becomes the new normal
 
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Want to join the debate? Check out the Intelligence Squared website to hear about future live events and podcasts: http://www.intelligencesquared.com __________________________ It was a blast. Since the Industrial Revolution, we enjoyed unprecedented economic growth, propelled by a seemingly unstoppable wave of technological innovation. For 100 years from around 1870, life in the West was transformed by inventions such as electricity, the car and domestic appliances, which led to soaring growth, better lives and booming wealth for all. The poor became less poor, and the number of middle income earners exploded. In the second half of the 20th century the rest of the world began to catch up, with China lifting hundreds of millions out of extreme poverty and the rise of the BRICs. But then it stopped. Since around 1970, middle incomes in the US have stagnated, while the top 1% have pulled away in terms of earnings and wealth. Productivity growth fell. The great recession of 2008 was expected to be a blip but we are still in the doldrums. China’s miracle growth has shuddered to a slowdown and is set to drop even further. Just last week, the European Central Bank announced fresh rounds of quantitative easing to try and pump life into the eurozone’s flagging economy. Many economists are now predicting that stagnation is here to stay. We may hear a lot of excited talk from the techno-optimists about the Second Machine Age and the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the rewards they are set to bring us, but some say that most of the fruits of the IT revolution have already been harvested. For example, driverless cars may be the future, but they will change the world far less than the invention of cars in the first place – and put millions of professional drivers out of a job. If the age of endless growth is over, how should we assess the implications? Does the developed world face decades of misery-inducing recession, or – given that the planet’s resources are finite – can we look forward to a more sustainable future where ever-increasing consumption does not count as the main good? Or are the economic doom-mongers wrong? Will capitalism, that engine of human ingenuity, continue to be the route to rising prosperity for all? If so, what are the mechanisms that will kick-start the global economy again? On 16th May 2016, we were joined by a star panel for this major discussion on the future of the global economy. On stage were Stephanie Flanders, JP Morgan’s chief market strategist for Europe; Deirdre McCloskey, acclaimed US economic historian; and Tim Jackson, Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey and author of 'Prosperity Without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet'. The event was chaired by Economics Editor of BBC News Kamal Ahmed.
Views: 9533 iqsquared
Why is GERMANY such an INDUSTRIAL LEADER? – VisualPolitik EN
 
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How is it possible that Germany could export so much when their products are not that cheap? Why can German students find a job right after they finish their studies? What is Ordoliberalism about? Today we'll answer all these questions. Visit Caspian Report, a channel about geopolitics: https://www.youtube.com/user/CaspianReport And don't forget to visit our friend’s podcast, Reconsider Media: http://www.reconsidermedia.com/ Interesting links: DESMA website: http://www.desma.de/en/index.php How Germany became Europe’s wealthiest country? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uad1Ma5DSMA German mittlestands: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUjqQZLbKgA Law and Order, German ordoliberalism: https://www.economist.com/news/europe/21650565-german-ordoliberalism-has-had-big-influence-policy-during-euro-crisis-rules-and-order The long shadow of Ordoliberalism: http://www.ecfr.eu/article/commentary_the_long_shadow_of_ordoliberalism Trade Unions in Germany: http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/id-moe/09113-20120828.pdf How did IRELAND step out of poverty: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDzSIuW6uiM Can MACRON save FRANCE?: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jskeZMDsDhM
Views: 975492 VisualPolitik EN
Tax reform started a feeding frenzy of economic growth: Art Laffer
 
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Former Reagan Economic Advisor Art Laffer on the tax reform bill's impact on the U.S. economy.
Views: 30504 Fox Business
Inflation Deterring Economic Growth
 
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Peter Schiff on Fox Business 1/16/2015 Sign up for my free newsletter: http://www.europac.net/subscribe_free_reports Buy my newest book at http://www.tinyurl.com/RealCrash Friend me on http://www.Facebook.com/PeterSchiff Follow me on http://www.Twitter.com/PeterSchiff
Views: 17280 Peter Schiff
Can Trump Reach 3% Economic Growth?
 
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In this video, I’ll explore whether the Trump administration stands a chance of reaching its goal of 3% economic growth. On the campaign trail, President Trump said he would get the US to 5% annual economic growth. In office, his team lowered this to 3-4%. The economy hasn’t growth at 3% in more than a decade. Its recent pace has been 2.1%. Nonpartisan Congressional Budget office predicts a long-term growth average of about 2%. Reasons: Slower growth of eligible workers, and a declining productivity rate. Three years ago, The WSJ published a chart from John Burns Real Estate Consulting. It shows declining growth of the US labor pool. Potential long-term growth rate is the sum of workforce growth and productivity growth. The workforce is projected by the CBO to expand at 0.5% annually over the next decade and productivity at 1.3%, for growth of 1.8%. That’s the “about 2%” I mentioned earlier. In May, the WSJ published these charts of the two trends, with data from the Labor Department: [Charts in the video] Turning back to the CBO’s projection of the two components of economic growth, we see that Trump will need to focus on boosting productivity. This chart was also published by the WSJ in May: Can Team Trump boost productivity? Probably not. Demographic trends point to lower human productivity in the decades ahead. However, a trend completely independent of government policies could come to the rescue: automation. Better robots and artificial intelligence are more productive than people. Factories are spending millions on upgrades to machines that can do the work of many human employees. The problem is that even if higher productivity through bots increases economic growth, it will be pointless if people don’t benefit. This is a tough nut to crack. Here’s hoping for higher growth in a way that helps people.
Views: 511 The Kelly Letter
Can the Government Run the Economy?
 
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With the smartest experts and the best economists, could the federal government run the U.S. economy? Could it keep America's $17 trillion economy going like a well-oiled machine? Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of Forbes Media, explains why no one person or group can "run" the economy, and why any attempt to do so can only make things worse. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: Is our economy a machine, like an automobile, a train or a power plant? One constantly hears phrases such as the economy “is overheating” or “needs to cool off” or “could use some stimulus.” These aren’t harmless metaphors. They epitomize how economists have taught us to see an economy—as something that can be manipulated, guided or driven. And guess who does the driving? The government. The government is supposed to make sure that the economy “hums” along at an even speed, going neither too fast nor too slow. But the economy is not a machine. It is made up of people, and no one can control what billions of them are going to do. What gets overlooked, underplayed or simply ignored is the extraordinary “churn” in the activities of a free market. New businesses open while others close, constantly. In the U.S. during normal times a half-million or more jobs are created each week, while another half-million are cut. Entrepreneurs continually roll out new products and services, most of which flop. But those that succeed can greatly improve our quality of life. What government can and should do is to positively influence the environment in which this hum of activity takes place through sensible taxation, monetary policy, government spending and regulation. And in almost all instances the best prescription for economic health is “less is more.” Catastrophic mistakes by governments can poison the marketplace, as happened during the Great Depression in the 1930s, to a lesser extent in the 1970s, and then again in the panic of 2008–09. The government’s recent mistakes have been compounded by tax increases and an avalanche of antigrowth regulations from ObamaCare, the Dodd-Frank financial services bill and all those Washington regulatory agencies, such as the FCC, the EPA and the National Labor Relations Board. If you want to understand why the American economy has been growing at the anemic pace of 1 to 2 percent a year, look no further. Again, the idea of an economy that purrs along like a well-oiled machine hurts, not enhances, wealth creation because invariably, it leads to growth retarding government intervention. Which brings us to bubbles. Shouldn’t the government, the argument goes, at least try to stop them from happening? Well, it depends. Those caused by misguided government policies like the housing bubble of the mid 2000’s, yes. Those caused by the free market, no. Bubbles have a bad name, but not all of them are created equal. There are healthy ones and unhealthy ones. The good kind develops when a lot of people simultaneously recognize a great opportunity. Computers are an excellent example. During the early 1980s there was a boom in personal computers–followed by a severe shakeout, when companies such as Atari and Commodore bit the dust. In the late 1990s a number of companies recognized the importance of search engines. Google emerged supreme with Microsoft and others relegated to fractional market shares. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/can-government-run-economy
Views: 936423 PragerU
Economic Systems and Macroeconomics: Crash Course Economics #3
 
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In which Jacob Clifford and Adriene Hill teach you about Economic Systems and Macroeconomics. So, economics is basically about choices. We'll look at some of the broadest economic choices when we talk about the difference between planned economies and market economies. We'll get into communism, socialism, command economies, and capitalism. We'll look at how countries choose the kind of system they're going to use (spoiler alert: many end up with mixed economies). We'll also look into how individuals make economic choices. Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall TO: Everyone FROM: Martin To gild refined gold is just silly. TO: Dana FROM: Cameron Still holding out. We're going to make it! Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Raymond Cason, Marcel Pogorzelski, Cowgirlgem, Chua Chen Wei, Catherine Emond, Victoria Uney, Robin Uney, Damian Shaw, Sverre Rabbelier Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1523748 CrashCourse
China's trillion dollar plan to dominate global trade
 
05:59
It's about more than just economics. To learn more, visit https://reconnectingasia.csis.org/map/ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO China's Belt and Road Initiative is the most ambitious infrastructure project in modern history. It spans over 60 countries and will cost over a trillion dollars. The plan is to make it easier for the world to trade with China, by funding roads, railways, pipelines, and other infrastructure projects in Asia and Africa. China is loaning trillions of dollars to any country that's willing to participate and it's been a big hit with the less democratic countries in the region. This makes the BRI a risky plan as well. But China is pushing forward because its goals are not strictly economic, they're also geopolitical. To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy. Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com. Watch our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o Or Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Views: 3390570 Vox
Intro to the Solow Model of Economic Growth
 
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Here's a quick growth conundrum, to get you thinking. Consider two countries at the close of World War II—Germany and Japan. At that point, they've both suffered heavy population losses. Both countries have had their infrastructure devastated. So logically, the losing countries should’ve been in a post-war economic quagmire. So why wasn't that the case at all? Following WWII, Germany and Japan were growing twice, sometimes three times, the rate of the winning countries, such as the United States. Similarly, think of this quandary: in past videos, we explained to you that one of the keys to economic growth is a country's institutions. With that in mind, think of China's growth rate. China’s been growing at a breakneck pace—reported at 7 to 10% per year. On the other hand, countries like the United States, Canada, and France have been growing at about 2% per year. Aside from their advantages in physical and human capital, there's no question that the institutions in these countries are better than those in China. So, just as we said about Germany and Japan—why the growth? To answer that, we turn to today's video on the Solow model of economic growth. The Solow model was named after Robert Solow, the 1987 winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics. Among other things, the Solow model helps us understand the nuances and dynamics of growth. The model also lets us distinguish between two types of growth: catching up growth and cutting edge growth. As you'll soon see, a country can grow much faster when it's catching up, as opposed to when it's already growing at the cutting edge. That said, this video will allow you to see a simplified version of the model. It'll describe growth as a function of a few specific variables: labor, education, physical capital, and ideas. So watch this new installment, get your feet wet with the Solow model, and next time, we'll drill down into one of its variables: physical capital. Helpful links: Puzzle of Growth: http://bit.ly/1T5yq18 Importance of Institutions: http://bit.ly/25kbzne Rise and Fall of the Chinese Economy: http://bit.ly/1SfRpDL Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1RxdLDT Next video: http://bit.ly/1RxdSzo Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/IHQj/
POLITICAL THEORY - Adam Smith
 
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Adam Smith was no uncritical apologist for capitalism: he wanted to understand how capitalism could be both fruitful and good. If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ SUBSCRIBE to our channel for new films every week: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Mike Booth http://www.YouTube.com/SomeGreyBloke #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 927832 The School of Life
How The Economic Machine Works by Ray Dalio
 
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Economics 101 -- "How the Economic Machine Works." Created by Ray Dalio this simple but not simplistic and easy to follow 30 minute, animated video answers the question, "How does the economy really work?" Based on Dalio's practical template for understanding the economy, which he developed over the course of his career, the video breaks down economic concepts like credit, deficits and interest rates, allowing viewers to learn the basic driving forces behind the economy, how economic policies work and why economic cycles occur. To learn more about Economic Principles visit: http://www.economicprinciples.org. [Also Available In Chinese] 经济这台机器是怎样运行的: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZbeYejg9Pk [Also Available In Russian] Как действует экономическая машина. Автор: Рэй Далио (на русском языке): http://youtu.be/8BaNOlIfMLE
Views: 6558370 Principles by Ray Dalio
'Sri Lanka: State of the Economy 2018' Highlights
 
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The IPS’ annual flagship report 'Sri Lanka: State of the Economy' provides a critical assessment of the country’s economic performance and near term outlook for growth and macroeconomic stability. This year, the report draws attention to ‘Climate Change, Food Security and Disaster Risk Management’ as its main thematic focus to examine the many interrelated socio-economic impacts that need policy consideration. For more information, please visit http://www.ips.lk/publications/state-of-the-economy-report/
Views: 676 IPS Sri Lanka
Global Economic Outlook
 
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Although global economic growth is expected to continue strengthening, long- awaited changes in monetary policy present fresh challenges in 2018. Are policy- makers and investors prepared for potential shifts in capital flows in this new environment? · Hans-Paul Bürkner, Chairman, Boston Consulting Group, Germany · Daniel Funes de Rioja, Chair, B20 Argentina, Argentina · Henrique Meirelles, Minister of Finance of Brazil · Andrés Velasco, Professor of International Practice in International Development, Columbia University, Chile Moderated by · Erik Schatzker, Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg Television & Radio, USA http://www.weforum.org/
Views: 9025 World Economic Forum
Arminio Fraga: “Brazil’s Growth Machine is Broken
 
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On April 11, 2016, a 65-member congressional panel voted to proceed with impeachment charges against President Dilma Rousseff. ➙ The process could be time consuming. ➙ Yet, despite the attention paid to the daily political vicissitudes, the country must consider the overall causes of a swift economic downturn . Impeaching President Rousseff may shake up the political system, but it will not, by itself, fix a flagging economy. Our forthcoming report The Crossroads Brazil investigates precisely these causes. As part of the project, I interviewed ➙ Arminio Fraga, a former Central Bank President in Brazil, and perhaps the opposition’s top economist. Get insight into ➙ where the opposition sees the problems in Brazil ➙ what changes might occur should it achieve power Enjoy the conversation, and check back soon for The Crossroads Brazil
Views: 853 GEDProject
Hans Rosling: Global population growth, box by box
 
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http://www.ted.com The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth. This is the paradoxical answer that Hans Rosling unveils at [email protected] using colorful new data display technology (you'll see). TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate. Watch a highlight reel of the Top 10 TEDTalks at http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/top10
Views: 946042 TED
Aspen Forum 2014: Political Economy of Telecom Reform
 
01:10:34
TECH IN TRANSITION: POLICY CHALLENGES New policy challenges are emerging from technological advances across the Internet ecosystem. The transition from switched to IP networks raises questions regarding the scope of regulation and the need for a new Telecommunications Act. The rise of big data and recent data breaches have renewed calls for federal action. Policy makers are taking a fresh look at how well our intellectual property regimes stimulate creativity and innovation in the digital world. On the international front, many countries and organizations are challenging the foundations of traditional internet governance. What does this all mean for tech policy in the years ahead? Discussion panels and speakers at the 2014 TPI Aspen Forum focused on how the communications, technology and content industries are transforming and how public policies are adapting, or not, to the changing environment.
Bureaucracy Basics: Crash Course Government and Politics #15
 
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This week Craig Benzine discuses bureaucracies. Bureaucracies tend to be associated with unintelligible rules and time-wasting procedures, but they play an important, though controversial, role in governing. From the FDA to the EPA, these agencies were established to help the government manage and carry out laws much more efficiently - to bring the rule making and enforcement closer to the experts. But the federal bureaucracy (which is part of the executive branch) has a lot of power and sometimes acts likes Congress in creating regulations and like the courts through administrative adjudications. It's all a bit problematic for that whole "separation of powers" thing. So we'll talk about that too, and the arguments for and against increased federal bureaucracy. Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 637300 CrashCourse
LSE Events | Jeffrey D. Sachs | Man and Machine
 
01:55:51
The automation of robots and artificial intelligence is pretty well advanced in certain industries. The income now is shifting more and more to capital and away from workers, contributing to a general widening of inequality in the United States. Jeff Sachs argues that we need to pursue policies so that the coming generation of smart machines works for us and our well-being, rather than humanity working for the machines and the few who control their operating systems. Jeffrey D. Sachs (@JeffDSachs) is Professor of Economics at Columbia University, a leader in sustainable development, senior UN advisor, bestselling author and syndicated columnist. Francesco Caselli is Norman Sosnow Professor of Economics, LSE, and Director of the Macroeconomics Program at LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance (CEP). The CEP (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the LSE Research Laboratory. It was established by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) in 1990 and is now one of the leading economic research groups in Europe. The International Growth Centre (@The_IGC) aims to promote sustainable growth in developing countries by providing demand-led policy advice based on frontier research. The IGC directs a global network of world-leading researchers and in-country teams in Africa and South Asia and works closely with partner governments to generate high quality research and policy advice on key growth challenges.
Asia to Lead Global Economic Growth in 2010
 
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The United Nations says the world economy is on the mend. In its annual economic report released Wednesday (January 20), the U.N. predicts a global growth rate of 2.4 percent in 2010 with East and South Asia taking the lead. But the organization warns conditions for sustained growth around the world remain fragile. VOA's Mil Arcega has more.
Views: 2059 VOA News
Part 1: Dynamic Philippine Economy: Growth, Reform, and Looking Ahead
 
02:17:33
The CSIS Sumitro Chair for Southeast Asia Studies is pleased to invite you to participate in the " Dynamic Philippine Economy: Growth, Reform, and Looking Ahead" conference on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. CSIS will bring together key thought leaders, business executives, and policy makers from the Philippines and the United States for a discussion on how key economic trends relate to the future of U.S.-Philippine relations. The focus will be on trade, investment, innovation, development, and other important business trends in the Philippines.
Supply and Demand: Crash Course Economics #4
 
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In which Adriene Hill and Jacob Clifford teach you about one of the fundamental economic ideas, supply and demand. What is supply and demand? Well, you’ll have to watch the video to really understand it, but it’s kind of important for everything economically. Supply and demand sets prices, and indicates to manufacturers how much to produce. Also, it has a lot to do with strawberries. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1540224 CrashCourse
Andy Stern: There Is a Way to Stop Machines From Making Americans Poorer
 
11:25
Advances in technology are rapidly transforming our economy, enabling smarter, cheaper and faster ways of producing goods, acquiring services, and communicating with others. But, warns Andy Stern, former president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) now teaching at Columbia, the enormous potential of technological change also carries the peril of mounting inequality. The engine of prosperity, he warns, is increasingly being decoupled from the jobs through which millions of Americans have joined, and remained in the country’s middle class. His extensively researched book Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American Dream makes a robust case for a change in social policy. Recognizing the danger of technological advances dragging down the economy by reinforcing unemployment and inequality, he argues that a guaranteed universal basic income for all citizens is key to sustaining demand in the U.S. economy.
Views: 5865 New Economic Thinking

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