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Fossil Fuels 101
 
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Fossil fuel is a term used to describe a group of energy sources that were formed when ancient plants and organisms were subject to intense heat and pressure over millions of years. Learn more about the fossil fuels and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 740770 Student Energy
Fossil Fuels vs Renewable Energy Sources
 
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-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 66114 Milind Amritkar
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Energy from fossil fuels
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at how fossil fuels are used for energy. First we explore the advantages of using fossil fuels and then we look at the negative aspects.
Views: 81056 Freesciencelessons
Will Fossil Fuels Run Out? | Earth Lab
 
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Greg Foot looks into the dirty world of fossil fuels. Will we run out of fossil fuels and what cost will we likely pay for their use? Footnotes 1 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html and https://www.theguardian.com/science/2009/feb/07/first-dinosaurs-late-triassic 2 - http://www.fe.doe.gov/education/energylessons/coal/gen_howformed.html 3- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 4- https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/pdf/energy-economics/statistical-review-2015/bp-statistical-review-of-world-energy-2015-full-report.pdf 5- http://fortune.com/2016/07/05/oil-reserves-us/ 6- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 7- http://www.forbes.com/sites/davidblackmon/2013/07/16/as-fracking-rises-peak-oil-theory-slowly-dies/#7bc2bf0c589b 8- https://www.eia.gov/energy_in_brief/article/shale_in_the_united_states.cfm 9- https://www.theguardian.com/environment/earth-insight/2013/jul/23/peak-oil-bbc-shale-fracking-economy-recession 10- http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2013EO280001/abstract 11- http://www.npr.org/sections/money/2016/08/17/490375230/oil-3-how-fracking-changed-the-world 12- https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-13/saudi-arabia-overtakes-u-s-as-largest-oil-producer-iea-says 13 - http://climate.nasa.gov/ and http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2015/05/26/climate_change_denying_reality_is_a_threat_to_our_nation.html 14 https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases 15 http://www.carbontracker.org/resources/ and https://www.theguardian.com/environment/keep-it-in-the-ground-blog/2015/mar/25/what-numbers-tell-about-how-much-fossil-fuel-reserves-cant-burn 16 - https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-age-of-wind-and-solar-is-closer-than-you-think/ Subscribe for more awesome science - http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HeadsqueezeTV http://www.youtube.com/user/HeadsqueezeTV
Views: 407761 BBC Earth Lab
Source of Energy {Fuels & Fossil Fuels} , (Conventional sources of energy)  Class 10 Science [Hindi]
 
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This video explains about the fuels and the fossil fuels which are the conventional sources of energy.In this video it is explained in very simple way. Hydro power plant and its working ::-- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tD83fi5ZTYg PLEASE LIKE, SHARE , & SUBSCRIBE .........
Views: 2556 We R Students
Fossil Fuels
 
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024 - Fossil Fuels In this video Paul Andersen explains how fossil fuels are formed when organic material is heating and squeezed in an anaerobic environment. Formation, extraction, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed for coal, petroleum and natural gas. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Intro Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License Outro Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: BLM, T. P. F. office of the. (2007). English: A natural gas drilling rig on the Pinedale Anticline, just west of Wyoming’s Wind River Range. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rig_wind_river.jpg Bobjgalindo. (2004). English: Gas prices, may 2004, Sinclair gas station, Oregon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:GasPriceOR.jpg Coal formation. (n.d.). Retrieved November 20, 2015, from https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/13598459184/ Company, N. I. O. (1970). Bidboland gas refinery Aghajary Iran. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bidboland_gas_refinery.jpg Delphi234. (2014). English: Total world energy consumption by source 2013, from REN21 Renewables 2014 Global Status Report. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Total_World_Energy_Consumption_by_Source_2013.png Diatom. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/174569/diatom English: Anthracite coal. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_anthracite.jpg John, J. S. (2013). English: Tar sandstone from the Monterey Formation of Miocene age. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tar_Sandstone_California.jpg Knight, A. E. (2015). English: A sign for a Sinclair gas station. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sinclair_gas_station_sign.JPG Observatory, N. E. (2009). English: Athabasca Oil Sands NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Athabasca_oil_sands.jpg Plazak. (2015). English: Hubbert’s upper-bound prediction for US crude oil production (1956), and actual lower-48 states production through 2014. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_Upper-Bound_Peak_1956.png Unknown. (2004). English: Coal mine in Wyoming. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coal_mine_Wyoming.jpg USA, G. ([object HTMLTableCellElement]). Italiano: Grafico che rappresenta il picco di Hubbert della produzione petrolifera mondiale. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hubbert_world_2004.svg User. (2011). English: Chu Huo in Kenting, Taiwan. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chuhuo.jpg Wikipedia, F. at E. (2007). English: A pumpjack in Texas. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Oil_well.jpg Wikipedia, S. at E. (2007). English: Castle Gate Power Plant near Helper by David Jolley 2007. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Castle_Gate_Power_Plant,_Utah_2007.jpg Wikipedia, T. original uploader was D. at E. (2004). Coal cars in Ashtabula, Ohio. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ashtabulacoalcars_e2.jpg Wikipedia, W. at E. (2007). Outcrop of Ordovician oil shale (kukersite), northern Estonia. Retrieved from https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:OilShaleEstonia.jpg Zooplankton silhouette. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://openclipart.org/detail/170815/zooplankton-silhouette
Views: 107185 Bozeman Science
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Renewable sources of energy
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at the advantages and disadvantages of renewable sources of energy. We explore solar, wind and hydro and then move on to other sources such as geothermal, tidal, wave and biofuels.
Views: 101787 Freesciencelessons
Renewable Energy Explained in 2 1/2 Minutes
 
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This is an unofficial explainer video I created for a college project. I decided to gear it toward TheSolutionsProject.org. The assets went from Adobe Illustrator to After Effects. This animation explains the different types of energy such as, fossil fuels, biomass, nuclear and renewables. Written, animated and illustrated by Dane Bliss Music by: Essa: https://soundcloud.com/essa-1 Voiceover by: Mike Porter: https://goo.gl/GNouYE Visit my online portfolio to see some more work at http://www.DaneBliss.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/DaneBlissDesign Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Dane-Bliss-Graphic-Design-813194572110628/timeline/ German translation by Robert Orzanna Twitter: https://twitter.com/orschiro
Views: 496349 Dane Bliss Design
Renewable Energy 101 | National Geographic
 
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There are many benefits to using renewable energy resources, but what is it exactly? From solar to wind, find out more about alternative energy, the fastest-growing source of energy in the world—and how we can use it to combat climate change. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Select footage courtesy NASA https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=11056 Read more in "Renewable energy, explained" https://on.natgeo.com/2I5gp3L Renewable Energy 101 | National Geographic https://youtu.be/1kUE0BZtTRc National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 430857 National Geographic
Coal 101
 
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Coal is a combustible black or dark brown rock consisting of carbonized plant matter, found mainly in underground deposits and widely for electricity production. Learn more about coal and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 124602 Student Energy
Fossil Fuels: The Greenest Energy
 
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To make earth cleaner, greener and safer, which energy sources should humanity rely on? Alex Epstein of the Center for Industrial Progress explains how modern societies have cleaned up our water, air and streets using the very energy sources you may not have expected--oil, coal and natural gas. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: What if I told you that someone had developed an energy source that could help us solve our biggest environmental challenges, purify our water and air, make our cities and homes more sanitary, and keep us safe from potential catastrophic climate change? What if I also told you that this energy source was cheap, plentiful, and reliable? Well, there is such a source. You probably know it as fossil fuel. Oil. Natural gas. Coal. But wait? Don’t fossil fuels pollute our environment and make our climate unlivable? That, of course, is what we’re told…and what our children are taught. But let’s look at the data. Here’s a graph you’ve probably never seen: the correlation between use of fossil fuels and access to clean water. More fossil fuel. More clean water. Am I saying the more we that we have used fossil fuel, the cleaner our water has become? Yes, that’s exactly what I’m saying. In the developed world, we take clean water for granted. We turn on a tap and it’s there. But getting it there takes a massive amount of energy. Think of the man-made reservoirs, the purification plants, the network of pipes. In the undeveloped world, it’s a much different story. They lack the energy, so they lack clean water. More fossil fuel. More clean water. The same is true of sanitation. By the use of cheap, plentiful, and reliable energy from fossil fuels, we have made our environment cleaner. Take a look at this graph. More fossil fuel. Better sanitation. Okay, what about air quality? Here’s a graph of the air pollution trends in the United States over the last half century based on data from the Environmental Protection Agency. Note the dramatic downward trend in emissions, even though we use more fossil fuel than ever. How was this achieved? Above all, by using anti-pollution technology powered by…fossil fuel: oil, natural gas and coal. But even without modern pollution control technology, fossil fuel makes our air cleaner. Indoor pollution—caused by burning a fire inside your house, cabin, hut or tent to cook and keep warm—was a deadly global problem until the late 19th century when cheap kerosene, a fossil fuel byproduct, became available in America and Europe. Indoor pollution is still a major issue in the developing world today. The best solution? Fossil fuel. And now we come to the biggest fossil fuel concern of all—global warming. On this very sensitive topic we need to get our terms straight: There is a big difference between mild global warming and catastrophic global warming. We can all agree on that, right? The issue isn’t: does burning fossil fuel have some warming impact? It does. The issue is: is the climate warming dangerously fast? In 1986 NASA climate scientist James Hansen—one of the world’s most prominent critics of the use of fossil fuels—predicted that “if current trends are unchanged,” temperatures would rise 2 to 4 degrees in the first decade of the 2000s. But as you can see from this graph, since 2000 the trend line is essentially flat—little or no warming in the last 15 years. That’s probably why we hear much less talk about “global warming” and much more talk about “climate change.” For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/fossil-fuels-greenest-energy
Views: 759155 PragerU
Different Sources of Energy, Using Energy Responsibly, Educational Video for Kids
 
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Learning about the different sources of energy. The difference between renewable and non-renewable energy sources. Learn ways to conserve energy right at home, and make a difference! Recommended for grades: 4 - 6. Kids Educ SUBSCRIBE TO US http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc?sub_confirmation=1 To see the more kids movies go to http://www.youtube.com/user/KidsEduc
What Are Fossil Fuels? | National Geographic
 
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What are fossil fuels? How were they formed? Learn how human use of non-renewable energy sources, such coal, oil, and natural gas, affect climate change. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta What Are Fossil Fuels? | National Geographic https://youtu.be/YTnE0OQPTEo National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 53779 National Geographic
Non-Renewable Energy Resources | GCSE Physics | Doodle Science
 
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Follow me!: https://twitter.com/DoodleSci Doodle Science teaches you high school physics in a less boring way in almost no time! Script: Fossil fuels are non-renewable energy resources; these are coal, oil and natural gas. They were formed from the remains of living organisms millions of years ago and they release heat energy when they are burned. This heat is used to turn water into steam, which is used to turn a turbine, which then drives a generator to generate electricity. There are downsides however, fossil fuels release sulphur dioxide and carbon dioxide which lead to acid rain and an increase in global warming. Another form of non-renewable energy is Nuclear. The main nuclear fuels are uranium and plutonium. The nuclei of these large atoms are split in a process called nuclear fission to release a great deal of heat. The heat energy is again used to boil water. The kinetic energy in the expanding steam spins turbines, which then drive generators to produce electricity. Unlike fossil fuels, nuclear fuels do not produce carbon or sulphur dioxide. However, they do have the risk of a fault where large amounts of radioactive material could be released into the environment such as the disaster of Chernobyl in 1986.
Views: 147434 DoodleScience
Humans and Energy: Crash Course World History 207
 
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In which Stan Muller subs for John Green and teaches you about energy and humanity. Today we discuss the ideas put forth by Alfred Crosby in his book, Children of the Sun. Historically, almost all of the energy that humans use has been directly or indirectly generated by the sun, whether that be food energy from plants, wind energy, direct solar energy, or fossil fuels. Stan looks into these different sources, and talks about how humanity will continue to use energy in the future as populations grow and energy resources become more scarce. You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. SUBBABLE SPONSOR MESSAGES! TO: Dana FROM: Cameron you're wonderful, I can't wait for our faces to meet :) TO: TheGeekyBlonde FROM: Arbace Thanks for your outstanding Youtube Abuse Recovery video! http://youtu.be/3Uc5eNNG60o You can get Alfred Crosby's Children of the Sun here: http://smile.amazon.com/Children-Sun-Humanitys-Unappeasable-Appetite/dp/0393931536/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409260623&sr=8-1&keywords=crosby+children+of+the+sun
Views: 1119440 CrashCourse
What is energy for kids | Learn about Energy Sources | Renewable Energy |  الطاقة | エネルギー | zaffron
 
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This video represents a good explanation of What is energy for kids. You will gonna learn about Energy Sources for kids, How we use Energy ( how to save energy ) and a brief understanding about different types of Renewable Energy resources as well as the nonrenewable ones. ► What is energy ? The best definition of energy, that every children should know, is that the Scientists define energy as the ability to do work. Modern civilization is possible because people have learned how to change energy from one form to another and then use it to do work. We use energy to move cars along roads and boats through water, to cook food on stoves, to make ice in freezers, and to light our homes. Energy comes in different forms: Heat (thermal), Light (radiant), Motion (kinetic), Electrical, Chemical, Nuclear energy and Gravitational Energy. People use energy for everything from making a jump shot to sending astronauts into space. There are two types of energy: ( Stored (potential) energy + Working (kinetic) energy ). For example, the food a person eats contains chemical energy, and a person's body stores this energy until he or she uses it as kinetic energy during work or play. Energy sources can be categorized as renewable or nonrenewable When people use electricity in their homes, the electrical power was probably generated by burning coal, by a nuclear reaction, or by a hydroelectric plant on a river, to name just a few sources. Therefore, coal, nuclear, and hydro are called energy sources. When people fill up a gas tank, the source might be petroleum refined from crude oil or ethanol made by growing and processing corn. Energy sources are divided into two groups: 1- Renewable (an energy source that can be easily replenished) 2- Nonrenewable (an energy source that cannot be easily replenished). ► Renewable energy and nonrenewable energy for kids : Renewable and nonrenewable energy sources can be used as primary energy sources to produce useful energy such as heat or used to produce secondary energy sources such as electricity. When people use electricity in their homes, the electrical power was probably generated from burning coal or natural gas, a nuclear reaction, or a hydroelectric plant on a river, to name a few possible energy sources. The gasoline people use to fuel their cars is made from crude oil (nonrenewable energy) and may contain a bio-fuel (renewable energy) like ethanol, which is made from processed corn. ► Moreover, you will gonna learn What is renewable energy for kids ? There are five main renewable energy sources: 1- Solar energy from the sun 2- Geothermal energy from heat inside the earth 3- Wind energy 4- Biomass from plants 5- Hydro power from flowing water ► What is Nonrenewable energy ? Most of the energy consumed in the United States is from nonrenewable energy sources: ( Petroleum products - Hydrocarbon gas liquids - Natural gas - Coal - Nuclear energy ). Crude oil, natural gas, and coal are called fossil fuels because they were formed over millions of years by the action of heat from the earth's core and pressure from rock and soil on the remains (or fossils) of dead plants and creatures like microscopic diatoms. Most of the petroleum products consumed in the United States are made from crude oil, but petroleum liquids can also be made from natural gas and coal. Nuclear energy is produced from uranium, a nonrenewable energy source whose atoms are split (through a process called nuclear fission) to create heat and, eventually, electricity. By watching this video, you will gonna learn how to conserve energy resources ( energy saving ) by understanding how energy conservation mechanism work as well as much knowledge about alternative energy resources. Enjoy watching and have a great time learning about energy sources for children.
Views: 61760 Zaffron
Can 100% renewable energy power the world? - Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei
 
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Check out our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/teded View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/can-100-renewable-energy-power-the-world-federico-rosei-and-renzo-rosei Every year, the world uses 35 billion barrels of oil. This massive scale of fossil fuel dependence pollutes the earth, and it won’t last forever. On the other hand, we have abundant sun, water and wind, which are all renewable energy sources. So why don’t we exchange our fossil fuel dependence for an existence based only on renewables? Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei describe the challenges. Lesson by Federico Rosei and Renzo Rosei, directed by Giulia Martinelli. Thank you so much to our patrons for your support! Without you this video would not be possible! David & Pamela Fialkoff, Miami Beach Family, Kostadin Mandulov, Kyoung-Rok Jang, Alex Schenkman, Hachik Masis Bagdatyan, Sdiep Sriram, Ivan Todorović, Antero Semi, Yanuar Ashari, Mrinalini , Anthony Kudolo, Scott Gass, Querida Owens, David Lucsanyi, Hazel Lam, Jhiya Brooks, Manav parmar, Dwight Tevuk , Stephen A. Wilson, Siamak H, Minh Tran, Dominik Kugelmann, Michel Reyes, Katie Winchester, Mary Sawyer, Ryan Mehendale, David Rosario, Samuel Doerle, Be Owusu, Susan Herder, Savannah Scheelings, Prasanth Mathialagan, Yanira Santamaria, Chad Harper, Dawn Jordan, Constantin Salagor, Activated Classroom Teaching, Kevin Wong, Umar Farooq, Goh Xiang Ting Diana, Mohammad Khory, Dmitry Neverov, Tushar Sharma, Mukamik, Cristóbal Medina Moenne, Silas Schwarz, Fabio Peters, MJ Tan Mingjie, Yansong Li, Jason A Saslow, Michael Aquilina, Joanne Luce, Ayaan Heban, Henry Li, Elias Wewel, Kyle Nguyen, Taylor Hunter, Noa Shore, Lex Azevedo, Merit Gamertsfelder, Bev Millar, Rishi Pasham, Jhuval, SookKwan Loong, Daniel Day, Nick Johnson.
Views: 684099 TED-Ed
GCSE Science: Physics: Energy resources - fossil fuels and turbines
 
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A handy guide to energy resources from five minute physics. Perfect for science and physics GCSE or IGCSE. This exactly matches the AQA specification, but will be great whichever exam board you are with
Views: 623 five minute physics
NonRenewable energy Fossil Fuels
 
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Notes for Mr. Doves APES class on Non Renewable Fossil Fuel Resources
Views: 775 dovebiology
Energy 101: Electricity Generation
 
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Animated correspondent "Little Lee Patrick Sullivan" follows electricity from its source to the light bulb in your home, explaining different fuels, thermal power generation, transmission and the grid.
Views: 2389042 energynownews
Which Power Source Is Most Efficient?
 
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Australian researchers just unveiled the most efficient solar panels ever. How efficient are they, and what is the most efficient source of energy? Get 15% off http://www.domain.com's s domain names and web hosting when you use coupon code DNEWS at checkout! Read More: In world first -- UNSW researchers convert sunlight to electricity with over 40 percent efficiency http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-12/uons-iwf120514.php "UNSW Australia's solar researchers have converted over 40% of the sunlight hitting a solar system into electricity, the highest efficiency ever reported." New world record for solar cell efficiency at 46% French-German cooperation confirms competitive advantages of European photovoltaic industry http://www.ise.fraunhofer.de/en/press-and-media/press-releases/press-releases-2014/new-world-record-for-solar-cell-efficiency-at-46-percent "A new world record for the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity has been established." Australia develops world's most efficient solar panels http://rt.com/business/212383-australia-record-solar-energy/ "?Australian researchers have developed a new method of using commercial solar panels that converts more electricity from sunlight than ever before." What is the efficiency of different types of power plants? http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=107&t=3 "One measure of the efficiency of a power plant that converts a fuel into heat and into electricity is the heat rate." Improving Efficiencies http://www.worldcoal.org/coal-the-environment/coal-use-the-environment/improving-efficiencies/ "Improving efficiency levels increases the amount of energy that can be extracted from a single unit of coal." The Most Common Electricity Sources in the U.S. http://pureenergies.com/us/blog/the-most-common-electricity-sources-in-the-u-s/ "Though renewable energy is growing fast, the U.S. still gets the vast majority of its power from conventional power plants." Increasing the Efficiency of Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R43343.pdf "Coal has long been the major fossil fuel used to produce electricity." Coal Will Survive as Efficient Power Plants Boost Demand http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-02/coal-seen-surving-as-efficient-power-plants-boost-demand.html "President Barack Obama's plan to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions left coal with a future even as the industry accuses him of trying to make the fuel obsolete." How Do Wind Turbines Work? http://energy.gov/eere/wind/how-do-wind-turbines-work "So how do wind turbines make electricity?" Screwy-looking wind turbine makes little noise and a big claim http://www.gizmag.com/the-archimedes-liam-f1-urban-wind-turbine/32263/ "Although it's getting increasingly common to see solar panels on the roofs of homes, household wind turbines are still a fairly rare sight." Betz's law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betz%27s_law Wind Energy More Energy Efficient than Fossil Fuels http://cleantechnica.com/2012/07/18/wind-energy-energy-efficient-fossil-fuels-uk/ "Here's something that may surprise you. Wind energy is more efficient than carbon-based fuels." Wind Energy's Shadow: Turbines Drag Down Power Potential http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/05/130516-wind-energy-shadow-effect/ "As seemingly limitless as the air that swirls around us, wind has proven to be the world's fastest-growing source of renewable energy." Advanced Nuclear Power Reactors http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle/Power-Reactors/Advanced-Nuclear-Power-Reactors/ "The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for more than five decades and is starting to build the next generation of nuclear power reactors to fill new orders." Hydroelectric Power http://www.mpoweruk.com/hydro_power.htm "Hydro-electric power, using the potential energy of rivers, now supplies 17.5% of the world's electricity (99% in Norway, 57% in Canada, 55% in Switzerland, 40% in Sweden, 7% in USA)." Hydroelectric Power http://www.usbr.gov/power/edu/pamphlet.pdf "It's a form of energy ... a renewable resource." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 680805 Seeker
Non-renewable energy sources: Fossil fuels and Nuclear
 
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A explanation of fossil fuels and nuclear energy for AP Environmental Science students.
Views: 528 Lisa Bagley
Is there an alternative to fossil fuels?
 
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Green Biologics are a renewable chemicals company who are not only changing the face of renewable chemicals, but are changing the world while they are at it. Dr Liz Jenkinson is one of the lead researchers at the company, and it is her work that is providing the answer to the question: is there an alternative to fossil fuels? Her work proves that the answer is yes, and that it only relies on three key components – bacteria, genetic engineering and sugar.
Views: 13508 Science Animated
GCSE Physics - Introduction to Energy Resources  #7
 
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In this video we take an overview of the energy resources we use and the main ways in which we use that energy. We consider fossil fuels, nuclear energy and renewable resources, and then the uses such as transport and heating.
Views: 344 Cognito
Top 10 Energy Sources of the Future
 
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These are ten most promising alternative energy sources of tomorrow. It’s a really exciting time to be alive. We have a front row seat to the only known transformation of a world powered by dirty fossil fuels, to a planet that gets its energy from renewable, clean sources. It’s happening just once, right now. Subscribe to TDC: https://www.youtube.com/TheDailyConversation Like our page on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/thedailyconversation Join us on Google+ https://plus.google.com/100134925804523235350/posts Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/thedailyconvo 10. Space-based solar power http://energy.gov/articles/space-based-solar-power 9. Human Power http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientists-harness-human-power-electricity/ 8. Tidal Power http://www.renewablegreenenergypower.com/wave-energy-facts/ 7. Hydrogen (fuel cells) http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/story/chapter20.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen-powered_aircraft 6. Geothermal heat from underground lava beds http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_energy#Electricity https://theconversation.com/drilling-surprise-opens-door-to-volcano-powered-electricity-22515 5. Nuclear Waste http://nautil.us/issue/7/waste/our-nuclear-waste-is-a-goldmine http://gehitachiprism.com/ 4. Solar windows http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Growth_of_photovoltaics http://renewableresourcesinc.com/10-interesting-facts-about-solar-energy/#.VAtud2RdVB8 3. Bio-fuels (algae) http://cleantechnica.com/2014/08/20/alabama-gets-first-world-carbon-negative-algae-biofuel/ http://biofuel.org.uk/biofuel-facts.html 2. Flying wind farms http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/high-flying-turbine-produces-more-power-0515 http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=427&t=3 1. Nuclear fusion http://www.americansecurityproject.org/10-key-facts-about-nuclear-fusion/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITER#Timeline_and_current_status http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/nuclear-fusion-from-google-lockheed-draper-fisher/ This video profiles the alternative energy sources of the future and the areas of energy development. Check out our recent series on the solutions to stop Global Warming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PUAnR2PKHIs
Views: 1979297 The Daily Conversation
Advantages and Disadvantages of using Fossil Fuels, Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources GCSE Physic
 
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1cysaOnlv_E - 20% renewable energy by 2020
Views: 235 pcdcma
Oil and Gas Formation
 
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A fast paced explanation of how many oil and gas deposits form and how we explore for them.
GCSE Physics Revision: Fossil fuels
 
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GCSE Physics Revision: Fossil fuels You can watch all my videos at www.freesciencelessons.co.uk In this video, we look at the energy changes that take place in a power station burning fossil fuels. We then look at the advantages and disadvantages of generating electricity by this method.
Views: 41628 Freesciencelessons
Where Does All Our Oil Come From?
 
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We rely on oil to power our lives, but how do we go about getting it? How does oil even form? Read More: Fossil Fuel http://www.sciencedaily.com/articles/f/fossil_fuel.htm "Fossil fuels are hydrocarbons, primarily coal, fuel oil or natural gas, formed from the remains of dead plants and animals." If We Dig Out All Our Fossil Fuels, Here's How Hot We Can Expect It to Get http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/upshot/if-we-dig-out-all-our-fossil-fuels-heres-how-hot-we-can-expect-it-to-get.html?abt=0002&abg=1 "World leaders are once again racing to avert disastrous levels of global warming through limits on greenhouse gas emissions." How Oil Drilling Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/oil-drilling4.htm "Once the equipment is at the site, the crew sets the rig up." How Hydraulic Fracking Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/hydraulic-fracking.htm "With tumultuous gas prices and dependence on unsustainable fossil fuels at a high, there's a desperate need to find alternative energy sources" How do we get oil and gas out of the ground? http://www.world-petroleum.org/index.php?/Education/how-do-we-get-oil-and-gas-out-of-the-ground.html "Oil and gas can get trapped in pockets underground such as where the rocks are folded into an umbrella shape." A cleaner way to get petroleum out of oil sands http://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-process-washes-the-petroleum-off-oil-sands/ "The secret to business is buy low and sell high. Canadian holding company MCW Energy Group hopes to do that by economically separating the petroleum from oil sands and then selling it at market rates of double to triple the processing costs." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Julia Wilde on Twitter https://twitter.com/julia_sci DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
Views: 152329 Seeker
Energy Resources - Conventional and Non-Conventional
 
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In this video, we will learn in-depth about conventional and nonconventional sources of energy in the most relevant manner. This video is an elearning instructional design which is a web based e learning technique through which concepts become easier to understand. Its a revolutionary move, as the internet is flooding with many online learning classes, online education degrees, online education programs only to boost learning capability. Subscribe to my channel for more, as i will be developing elearning courses only to make you understand concepts in a crisp and clear manner. --- Click here if you want to subscribe:- https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealS... --- You can also view playlists of other NCERT Geography videos:- Class 6 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAZP9... Class 7 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Whz0l... Class 8 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIrwd... Class 9 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuDbi... Class 10 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTT_d... Class 11 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nntks... Whether you are preparing for Civil Services Aptitude Test (CSAT, IAS, IPS, IRS), National Defence Academy (NDA), Combined Defence Service Examination (CDS), Air Force Common Admission Test (AFCAT), Union Public Service Commission (UPSC), Indian Economic / Statistical Services Examination, Geologist Examination, Indian Forest Service Examination, Bank PO, Central Armed Police Forces (CAPF), Intelligence Bureau (IB), Combined Graduate Level (CGL), Combined Engineering Service Examination (Indian Railways), or any school exam. You can watch these video lectures without having to read the entire book full of texts. If you find it useful, please like and share. Any feedback, please send it across. Happy studying!
Views: 181328 Amit Sengupta
Renewable Energy: It Uses Practically No Water Compared to Fossil Fuels
 
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The Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently highlighted a little-discussed benefit of using renewables like wind and solar to produce electricity: Unlike most power sources, they require “almost no water.” This is remarkable because thermoelectric power generation is the leading use of water in America. (That said, only three percent of power generation's 133 billion gallons a day of water is considered “consumptive use,” as the U.S. Geological Survey says, “meaning it is lost to evaporation or blowdown during generation.”) According to the latest U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data from 2015, 41 percent of the water used in America is for power generation. The next highest use is irrigation for agriculture, accounting for 37 percent of U.S. water use (and close to two-thirds of that is consumptive). The Union of Concerned Scientists was raising this alarm in 2012 when the nonprofit created an infographic focused on the “energy-water collision,” which “refers to the range of issues that can crop up where our water resources and our power sector interact.” That can include increased competition for dwindling water sources and problems when the water going into or out of power plants is too warm. Why does producing electricity require so much water? As the Department of Energy (DOE) notes: “The main demand for water within a thermoelectric power plant is for condensing steam. Thermoelectric power generation typically converts the energy in a fuel source (fossil, nuclear, or biomass) to steam and then uses the steam to drive a turbine-generator.” This varies somewhat for natural gas, depending on the type of turbine. With many areas of the world, including large parts of America, already dealing with droughts and water shortages — problems expected to be exacerbated by climate change — the water intensity of power sources becomes another factor for local, state, and regional planners to consider. Coal’s Decline Brings Slight Progress The recent topline analysis from the EIA about water use for all energy sources in America is encouraging. Since 2014 the amount of water used to produce energy has been steadily declining. USGS data show this has been the trend since 2005: “The 2015 estimates put total withdrawals at the lowest level since before 1970, following the same overall trend of decreasing total withdrawals observed from 2005 to 2010.” Over a five year period from 2010 to 2015, water use for power generation dropped 18 percent. Much of this drop can be attributed to the decline in coal as a fuel source for electricity generation, as well as power plant closures and new plants implementing more water-efficient technologies. However, while the decline of the coal industry has meant power plants overall are using less water in the U.S., some of the power sources that are replacing coal, namely natural gas, are still highly dependent on water. While the natural gas industry’s claim that methane-rich gas is a cleaner “bridge fuel” to the future — an argument thoroughly debunked when accounting for globe-warming methane leaks in the supply chain — water use is another reason to consider wind and solar power over natural gas. Due to the various technologies used in natural gas power plants, some are more highly dependent on water than others. This variation makes it difficult to quantify just how much water natural gas power generation uses as a sector compared to coal. However, it is safe to say that natural gas power production uses less water than coal in general. Thus, the switch from coal to gas is contributing to the overal decline in water use for power generation, as the USGS and DOE say. As solar and wind become increasingly cost competitive with natural gas for electric power generation — especially in water-constrained areas of the country — they have the added advantage of being a water smart choice. Read more: https://www.desmogblog.com/2018/12/02/benefit-renewable-energy-uses-less-water-fossil-fuels Click here to subscribe to the DeSmog Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/DesmogBlog?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 79 DeSmog Blog
Energy Sources- Fossil Fuels
 
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Subject:Environmental Sciences Paper: Environmental geology
Views: 161 Vidya-mitra
Mapping the world's energy sources
 
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The world produces electricity from three major sources: fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and renewables. Of the three, fossil fuels is still the most dominant. So how many countries would be left in the dark if we were to ban them tomorrow? The innovators at goCompare can answer that question with their interactive map that reveals the different sources of energy that power the world. -------------------------------------------------- Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ -------------------------------------------------- Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.
Views: 18816 Business Insider
If Green Energy Is So Great, Why Aren't We Using It?
 
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Green energy is getting better and cheaper, yet we still largely rely on fossil fuels. Why haven't we switched to solar and wind energy yet? Which Countries Will Be Underwater Due To Climate Change? - https://youtu.be/1ilC2ODaWSY Which Countries Run On 100% Renewable Energy? - https://youtu.be/SrmsQzRQPPw Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: What Would Happen If We Burned All The Fossil Fuels On Earth? http://www.popsci.com/burning-all-fossil-fuels-could-raise-sea-levels-by-200-feet "A new study published today in Science Advances finds that if we burn all of the remaining fossil fuels on Earth, almost all of the ice in Antarctica will melt, potentially causing sea levels to rise by as much as 200 feet--enough to drown most major cities in the world." Who's Winning The Battle To Replace Coal? http://www.forbes.com/sites/thebakersinstitute/2016/05/17/whos-winning-the-battle-to-replace-coal/#e9dc97c6b09f "Coal is losing the battle for the electricity future in the United States. Investment in new coal-fired generating capacity has dried up with its share of electricity generation dropping from 53% in 2000 to 34% in 2015." Electricity in the United States http://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.cfm?page=electricity_in_the_United_States "In 2015, coal was used for about 33% of the 4 trillion kilowatthours of electricity generated in the United States. In addition to being burned to heat water for steam, natural gas can also be burned to produce hot combustion gases that pass directly through a natural gas turbine, spinning the turbine's blades to generate electricity." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Special thanks to Julian Huguet for hosting and writing this episode of DNews! Check Julian out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jhug00
Views: 360103 Seeker
Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas
 
05:42
Watch the following video to learn about: -The pros and cons of coal, oil and natural gas -The relative CO2 emissions of each fuel -Applying this information to make energy decisions This video was produced in 2014 as part of Introduction to Environmental Science (http://bit.ly/DartX_ENVX), offered as a MOOC by Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH, USA. The course ran February through March 2015 on http://edX.org. The course team includes: Professor Andrew Friedland, Instructor; Mike Goudzwaard, Instructional Designer and Co-Leader of Course; R. Michael Murray, Media Production; Sawyer Broadley, Video Editor.
Views: 14165 DART.ENVS.01.X
Power stations and the national grid | Electricity | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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The flick of a switch, that’s how easy it is to get electricity, right? If you’re one of the lucky ones, then yes. But in 2017 there are still over 1 billion people who do not have access to electricity. In this video we will discuss how electricity is generated and transferred to our homes, for those of us fortunate enough to have it. There are a variety of ways in which electricity is generated or made. How many can you think of? Solar panels, Wind turbines, Biomass, hydroelectric, nuclear and fossil fuels And then there is also geothermal energy, tidal power and wave power as well. Except for burning fossil fuels and nuclear, the rest are renewable sources of energy. Currently about 80% of the world’s energy comes from fossil fuels. First, we’re going to have a look at burning fossil fuels in power stations, to generate energy. And then we’ll look at the national grid - which is relevant for both non-renewable and renewable energies. Fossil fuels in power stations. Most power stations use coal as an energy source, and they work in the following way. Coal is burned in a power station. The heat produced as the coal burns is used to heat water. The water boils and turns into steam. This steam is used to turn the blades of a turbine. A turbine looks like a fan or a wind turbine. The turbine turns a generator. Inside, wires turn within magnets to generate electricity. So that was a fossil fuel power station. These next steps are for energy generated from any source - whether it’s fossil fuels or renewable like wind-powered substations or biomass fuelled. The electricity, whether renewable or not, is passed through transformers and wires, within the national grid, that carries it to our homes. So, what exactly is the National Grid? The National Grid is a system of cables and transformers linking power stations to consumers. Have you ever felt an electrical wire and noticed it gets hot? This is because some energy travelling through the wire is lost as heat. In order to lose as little energy as possible, transformers are used. When the electricity leaves the power station it passes through a step-up transformer. Power station @ 25,000 V A step-up transformer increases the voltage and reduces the current. National grid cables @ 275,000 V Reducing the current makes the transfer of electricity more efficient, as less energy is lost as heat. Before the electricity gets to our homes, the voltage needs to be reduced back down to a safe level. The electricity therefore passes through a step down transformer. Household @ 230 V So, now you know how electricity is generated and sent to our homes, it’s not quite as simple as flicking a switch. Quite a lot of infrastructure is needed. SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Safety Smart® Science with Bill Nye the Science Guy®: Renewable Energy -- PREVIEW
 
03:08
Bill Nye the Science Guy® explores the science of renewable energy and demonstrates how we can use science and technology to engineer a brighter tomorrow. Using his trademark blend of hands-on demos and humor, Bill Explains Newton's First Law. Then, he's off to the Renewable Energy Lab at UL to compare renewable and non-renewable energy sources such as fossil fuels, solar, wind, and hydroelectricity. Languages: English and Spanish http://www.dep-store.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=77E42VL00 For more information, go to www.DisneyEducation.com.
Can We Rely on Wind and Solar Energy?
 
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Is green energy, particularly wind and solar energy, the solution to our climate and energy problems? Or should we be relying on things like natural gas, nuclear energy, and even coal for our energy needs and environmental obligations? Alex Epstein of the Center for Industrial Progress explains. Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2ylo1Yt Joining PragerU is free! Sign up now to get all our videos as soon as they're released. http://prageru.com/signup Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/29SgPaX JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2c8vsff Script: Are wind and solar power the answer to our energy needs? There’s a lot of sun and a lot of wind. They’re free. They’re clean. No CO2 emissions. So, what’s the problem? Why do solar and wind combined provide less than 2% of the world’s energy? To answer these questions, we need to understand what makes energy, or anything else for that matter, cheap and plentiful. For something to be cheap and plentiful, every part of the process to produce it, including every input that goes into it, must be cheap and plentiful. Yes, the sun is free. Yes, wind is free. But the process of turning sunlight and wind into useable energy on a mass scale is far from free. In fact, compared to the other sources of energy -- fossil fuels, nuclear power, and hydroelectric power, solar and wind power are very expensive. The basic problem is that sunlight and wind as energy sources are both weak (the more technical term is dilute) and unreliable (the more technical term is intermittent). It takes a lot of resources to collect and concentrate them, and even more resources to make them available on-demand. These are called the diluteness problem and the intermittency problem. The diluteness problem is that, unlike coal or oil, the sun and the wind don’t deliver concentrated energy -- which means you need a lot of additional materials to produce a unit of energy. For solar power, such materials can include highly purified silicon, phosphorus, boron, and a dozen other complex compounds like titanium dioxide. All these materials have to be mined, refined and/or manufactured in order to make solar panels. Those industrial processes take a lot of energy. For wind, needed materials include high-performance compounds for turbine blades and the rare-earth metal neodymium for lightweight, specialty magnets, as well as the steel and concrete necessary to build structures -- thousands of them -- as tall as skyscrapers. And as big a problem as diluteness is, it’s nothing compared to the intermittency problem. This isn’t exactly a news flash, but the sun doesn’t shine all the time. And the wind doesn’t blow all the time. The only way for solar and wind to be truly useful would be if we could store them so that they would be available when we needed them. You can store oil in a tank. Where do you store solar or wind energy? No such mass-storage system exists. Which is why, in the entire world, there is not one real or proposed independent, freestanding solar or wind power plant. All of them require backup. And guess what the go-to back-up is: fossil fuel. Here’s what solar and wind electricity look like in Germany, which is the world’s leader in “renewables”. The word erratic leaps to mind. Wind is constantly varying, sometimes disappearing completely. And solar produces little in the winter months when Germany most needs energy. For the complete script, visit https://www.prageru.com/videos/can-we-rely-wind-and-solar-energy
Views: 1352485 PragerU
Natural Gas 101
 
03:39
Natural Gas is a flammable gas, consisting mainly of methane (CH4), occurring in underground reservoirs often with oil. Learn more about natural gas and all types of energy at www.studentenergy.org
Views: 318967 Student Energy
Physics Sources Of Energy part 2 (Conventional fuel : Fossil fuel) CBSE class 10 X
 
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Physics Sources Of Energy part 2 (Conventional fuel : Fossil fuel) CBSE class 10 X
Views: 47759 ExamFear Education
√ Origins of Fossil Fuels | Energy | Chemistry
 
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#iitutor #Chemistry #Energy https://www.iitutor.com/ Fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas are non-renewable energy sources that are derived from the remains of fossil plants and animals. Usually, when a plant or animal dies, it decays and is broken down by bacteria mainly into carbon dioxide and water. However the plant and animal remains may be buried beneath sediment before complete decomposition has taken place. The resulting material contains substantial amounts of carbon and hydrogen. Over a period of millions of years these carbon compounds may be converted into fossil fuels by the action of heat and pressure resulting from various geological processes. Essentially fossil fuels are mixtures of hydrocarbons, compounds containing only carbon and hydrogen, with small proportions of other compounds. Fossil fuels have chemical potential energy that is released when they are burned in air. The source of energy locked in these natural resources can ultimately be traced back to the solar energy captured millions of years ago by prehistoric plants. Coal is by far the most abundant fossil fuel. Most of the earth’s coal deposits were formed between 350 and 225 million years ago during the Carboniferous and Permian periods. Coal is produced by the accumulation of plant material in conditions where decomposition by oxidation is negligible. The stagnant waters often associated with swamps, marshes and mangroves are an ideal environment for this process. During the Carboniferous and Permian periods there was an abundance of plant life. Plant debris including leaves, bark and wood accumulated in these ancient swamps and was buried beneath more plant material. Initially the organic matter is converted into peat, a soft, spongy material containing large amounts of water. With increased pressure and temperature, peat is converted into brown coal (lignite) then black coal (bituminous coal) and finally anthracite. The first stage in the formation of coal is biochemical decomposition caused by anaerobic bacteria. This results in the loss of volatile compounds, with an overall increase in the relative carbon content. The second phase, coalification, occurs when the peat is buried and compressed by the deposition of sediments. In coalification the combined effects of temperature and pressure over long periods of time reduce the oxygen content and hydrogen content. This results in increasing carbon content through the sequence peat lignite bituminous coal anthracite. The type of coal produced is dependent on the degree to which the original material has been changed. For example, low grade peat can contain carbon, hydrogen and oxygen in the atomic ratios 1:2:1 while in high grade anthracite the carbon:hydrogen ratio can be as high as 5:2, with virtually no oxygen present. In summary the stages on the formation of different ranks of coal are: 1. Under the influence of pressure and heat, the buried plant material is first converted to peat (55% carbon), which can be used as a fuel source after excavation and drying. 2. Lignite (brown coal, ~67% carbon) is gradually formed from peat as long periods of heat and pressure from overlying sediments chemically alter the remains. 3. Black coal (85% carbon) is formed as compression and heating continue to drive off volatile material. 4. Anthracite coal (93% carbon) is the most metamorphosed form of coal with the lowest percentage of volatile materials (such as water). Coal contains numerous impurities particularly sulfur and sediments such as mud, deposited and buried with plant material. When the coal is burnt, these impurities form pollutants including sulfur dioxide and ash. The pollution associated with the combustion of fossil fuels is discussed later. The sulfur content of Australian coals is fairly low and our coal is therefore in great demand. The Latrobe Valley in Victoria contains some of the world's richest deposits of brown coal and vast deposits of black coal are found in the Sydney Basin, including the Hunter Valley, Lithgow and Wollongong. Petroleum is an organic mixture composed mainly of closely related hydrocarbons. The term petroleum refers to natural gas and crude oil, or mixtures of both, depending on its source. This is the starting point for the petrochemical industry, being the raw materials or ‘feedstocks’ for thousands of essential products. These include synthetic fibres, plastics, and agricultural chemicals, as well as substances used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, solvents, paints and detergents. Petroleum is initially formed in plants that convert sunlight into chemical energy by photosynthesis. The remains of plants and animals (organic matter) sink into an environment where it is protected from decomposition by aerobic microbes, such as at the bottom of deep stagnant swamps or on the continental shelf of the ocean.
Views: 2886 iitutor.com
Source of Energy - Fuels : Class 10 Science
 
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This is just a demo video, for more videos and full syllabus please contact us on 8287971571 or 0261-4890014. This is the video of class 10 Source of Energy. Topics covered in this video are as follows- Energy Crisis, Good source of energy, Classifying sources of energy, Fuels(Fossil Fuel, Disadvantage of Fossil Fuel, Uses of fossil fuels, Thermal Power Plant), Hydro-Power(Hydro-Power Plant (HPP), Disadvantage of HPP), Bio-Mass( Bio Gas Plant, Advantages of BG), Wind Energy(Advantages/ Disadvantages) Solar Energy(Solar Cooker, Solar Panel), Energy from sea(Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Ocean-thermal energy, Thermal Power Plant), Geothermal energy, Nuclear Energy, Environmental Consequences, Sun as ultimate source of energy,Liquid Petroleum Gas(LPG), Hydrogen, source of energy class 10, source of energy, source of energy class 10 in hindi, source of energy class 10 cbse, source of energy in hindi. Here is a demo of online video lecture. You can watch this complete video on our website Dronstudy OR Call us at - 8287971571
Views: 78903 Dronstudy.com
16. BBC Bitesize KS3 Revision Energy Resources BBC18LS16
 
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BBC Bitesize KS3 Revision Foundation (3-5) Tape 18
Views: 41481 Lammas Science
Renewed Energy Song
 
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Here is a song I created to help my 6th grade students study. I hope you enjoy. So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy Uh, uh, uh Oil, gas, and coal are used up Forming from plants remains of animals Built up in rock in layers Keep it trapped below We dig down for it Chemical energy released you burn on it People use fuels for cooking, electricity, lighting, cars, and heating And use them up but they're limited Supplies down demand so great we all need to find a better way Yeah, uh you know what? Need fuels to use again Sun is on my face Solar panels in place Catching solar rays Biogas from rotting waste Geothermal heat energy, volcanic areas blowing all day Wind turbines turning away Water is safe flowing away Hydroelectric power station Renewable sources only used about 5% So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy Reservoir's flowin' there Hydroelectric power plant Spinning turbine activates generators A large dam Ocean's everywhere we going thermal energy Mechanical is up when tides and waves come And then there's hydrogen One proton one electron Simple but no gas around Always combination From the ground up organic hydrocarbons Separated reforming no pollution Fuel cells combining the two gasses really Hydrogen and oxygen producing electricity Convert the energy not losing charge As long as the fuel continues to be supplied F-U-E-L, C-E-L-L, G-A-S, 4 C-A-R'S, clean fuel see Natural gas methanol Can fuel cells fueled directly No reformer So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy Yea, nuclear energy Produced when atoms are broken apart Maybe best one but makes radioactive waste So, nuclear energy Produced when atoms are broken apart Maybe best one but makes radioactive waste So what we use fuels It's what people need We're just having fun We don't care who sees But these fuels will go out Supplies are limited Need to use renewed energy
Views: 171867 ParrMr
Nuclear Energy Explained: Risk or Opportunity
 
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Please Read Below For More Information Anything with the word nuclear next to it usually comes with a fair bit of misunderstanding. Hopefully this video demystifies the process of how nuclear fuels are turned into electricity and how we can use them in combination with renewables in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the effects on the climate that come with high levels of them. Of course, there are many things that have been left out this video as nuclear energy, just as with any other source, has many different factors that need to be taken into account when making decisions. In order to fully understand the situation and make decisions, I highly recommend that you do some research of your own on the topic, rather than simply base your opinion on a four-minute YouTube video. It should also be noted that this video has been made from the perspective of the United States in general. Every area on Earth has different natural resources and environments that determine what works best there. On a lighter note, feel free to keep up with WhatTheWhy on Twitter at https://twitter.com/WhatTheWhy1 . Thanks for watching! Sources*: 20 percent of energy from nuclear power in the U.S.: http://www.nei.org/Knowledge-Center/Nuclear-Statistics/World-Statistics/World-Nuclear-Generation-and-Capacity Percent of electricity from each source http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/pdf/flow/primary_energy.pdf. Lifetime Carbon Emissions http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/report/IPCC_SRREN_Annex_II.pdf Carbon Emissions http://www.c2es.org/technology/factsheet/hydropower Nuclear Uprating: http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/fact-sheets/power-uprates.html Costs http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Economic-Aspects/Economics-of-Nuclear-Power/ Deaths caused by other fuel sources http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20928053.600-fossil-fuels-are-far-deadlier-than-nuclear-power.html?DCMP=OTC-rss&nsref=online-news#.U4k6SXnctR1 European deaths due to coal use http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2013/jun/12/european-coal-pollution-premature-deaths Indian deaths due to coal use http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/22/indias-coal-power-plants-kill-tens-of-thousands-every-year-study-says/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0 http://www.economist.com/node/18441163 http://climate.nasa.gov/news/903 Deaths from coal in the US. http://www.catf.us/fossil/problems/power_plants/ Levelized costs http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/electricity_generation.cfm http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2005/pr38/en/ http://thebulletin.org/managing-nuclear-spent-fuel-policy-lessons-10-country-study http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Safety-and-Security/Radiation-and-Health/Nuclear-Radiation-and-Health-Effects/ http://www.world-nuclear.org/info/Safety-and-Security/Safety-of-Plants/Safety-of-Nuclear-Power-Reactors/ Union of Concerned Scientists Death Estimate http://allthingsnuclear.org/how-many-cancers-did-chernobyl-really-cause-updated/ International Agency for Research on Cancer http://www.iarc.fr/en/media-centre/pr/2006/pr168.html Deaths Prevented With Nuclear Fuels http://climate.nasa.gov/news/903/ Interesting Run-through of Chernobyl https://leatherbarrowa.exposure.co/chernobyl *Not every source listed was used in the end video.
Views: 330303 WhatTheWhy
What is the Difference Between Renewable & Non renewable Resources | Natural Resources | Physics
 
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Difference between renewable & non renewable resources, natural resources. ....... Our Mantra: Information is Opportunity. Knowledge is Power. Be Informed - Be Powerful! SUPPORT US: SUBSCRIBE / LIKE / SHARE / COMMENT :) Subscribe Link: https://goo.gl/qbyzFb ....... CONNECT US: Website: http://www.simplyinfo.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SimplyInfo.net Twitter: https://twitter.com/SimplyInfo9 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/SimplyInfo9 Slideshare: https://www.slideshare.net/SimplyInfo9 Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/SimplyInfo9/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/simplyinfo9/ YouTube Subscribe Link: https://goo.gl/qbyzFb ....... OTHER PLAYLISTS TO EXPLORE: Games & Sports: https://goo.gl/uTXRWB Jobs & Career Info: https://goo.gl/cbCDXy Business Management: https://goo.gl/1sDjfW Information Technology: https://goo.gl/nWYpK8 Physics Concepts: https://goo.gl/FnLmes Education & Learning: https://goo.gl/54TR8A Filmmaking Concepts: https://goo.gl/RQL5qn Psychology Concepts: https://goo.gl/oYNNKA Indian Law Concepts: https://goo.gl/m98pWn Economics Concepts: https://goo.gl/yymX98 ....... About Simplyinfo.net: We provide the best info bytes videos in a very simple and effective way to learn, to revise and to master micro-content information. We simplify information in a wide variety of categories. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE to the channel for support. For any kind of courses / tutorials - Ask in the Comments. Visit our website: http://simplyinfo.net/ for all kinds of Courses and Info Videos. Contact Us: [email protected] Be Blessed with Love, Health & Happiness. Cheers & Have Fun :) Team SimplyInfo.net P.S. CLICK BELOW LINK TO SUBSCRIBE FOR UPDATES. SUBSCRIBE LINK: https://goo.gl/qbyzFb
Views: 43997 SimplyInfo
Renewable energy: can it ever replace fossil fuels, or do other sources have to be explored?
 
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For more information, transcripts and to join the discussion, visit: http://www.commentvisions.com/2008/05/01/topics/alternative-energies/solar-energy/air-conditioning-from-the-sun/ Renewable energy has been both praised and derided as an alternative source of power over the past two decades. To its detractors it is inefficient, unreliable and economically unsound. To its advocates it is free, clean, and unlimited in its potential. With global reliance on dwindling oil reserves an international political priority, attention continues to focus on renewable energy and its applications. This months Comment Visions examines the developments in renewable energy by talking to a man whose work harnesses the power of the sun to produce cooling technology. Dr Ahmet Lokurlu is a Turkish engineer and scientist whose company produces air conditioning systems run by solar power. Generating energy from the sun and turning it into cold air in countries where fuel-hungry air conditioning accounts for more than 40% of totally energy use vividly demonstrates the innovative solutions renewable sources can provide. The 2007 Road Map for Renewable Energy agreed by EU member states set the target of 20% of energy to be provided by renewable sources by 2020, highlighting the importance of the issue within the broader debate over energy challenges. As Dr Lokurlus work demonstrates it is technological development rather than political will, which will set the course for renewable energy in the future. This interview takes a fascinating look at this development and the role innovation can play in changing how we power the planet.
Views: 4067 CommentVisions
Freedom from fossil fuels is closer than you think  | Dhruvik Parikh | TEDxSnoIsleLibraries
 
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You might be wondering what a high school student can do to help address climate change. In his fascinating talk on his experimental research into energy independence, Dhruvik Parikh offers unique theories in the form of agricultural waste and “close-looped” systems where the waste of production can be used to fuel the next round of production creating local systems that are self-sustaining. Dhruvik also addresses concepts for community access to clean water and energy storage where whole communities work to develop their own collective renewable energy system. By examining the environmental and economic considerations of harnessing energies already available, Dhruhvik sees a future where cities can be self-sustaining and communities can thrive. Student at Henry M. Jackson High School, Mill Creek, Washington. Participant in a variety of clubs including the Technology Student Association and MIT Launch Club. Co-founded startup, Travalot, at the prestigious MIT Launch startup incubator. Managed strategy and operations for the company. Interested in finding solutions to the energy storage conundrum. Developed a novel method of biodiesel production using winery waste and engineered a membrane for redox flow batteries for superior conductivity. Is passionate about "distributed energy" and the equitable rollout of new technologies in developing countries. Well versed in Java and Python. Currently working on a deep learning approach to identify promising materials as components of redox flow batteries. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx
Views: 7506 TEDx Talks
How to fuel the future | The Economist
 
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America, under President Donald Trump, is securing its “energy independence” with oil and gas. But unlike fossil fuels, renewables will not increase global warming —and China is moving fast. Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: https://econ.st/2xvTKdy Oil moves the world around and creates powerful countries. Oil is such a vital commodity that it provoked wars throughout the 20th century. The few countries that produce it, try to keep control of it to ensure its riches stay at home. Those who do not have it, strive to get it. In the 1930s Saudi Arabia was one of the poorest countries in the world but the discovery of oil transformed it and Saudi Arabia has amassed $515.6 billion in sovereign wealth funds. It has become the linchpin of a powerful cartel that sometimes rations oil to push up prices. The United States is now the biggest producer of oil and gas owing to its shale revolution. It has tapped abundant reserves through fracking - a technology that uses high-pressure water and sand to fracture rock deep below the ground to extract hydrocarbons. This shale revolution has helped the United States become less dependent on oil imported from Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, Iraq, and other OPEC countries. More oil and gas on global markets has also benefited the world's energy consumers by pushing down costs. Oil still remains the primary fuel, supplying almost 1/3 of the world's energy but its heyday may soon be over, despite growing demand. By 2040 the world's global energy use is set to increase by 30 percent. That energy must be much cleaner if the world wants to prevent catastrophic global warming. In the past coal and gas were less expensive than renewable technology but their costs have come down dramatically. There is now a race among some nations to create more efficient renewable technologies to reduce pollution and be more energy self-sufficient. China is the world's largest consumer of coal and the second largest of oil but it also now leads the world in clean energy. one third of the world's new wind power and solar panels is installed in China, and it sells more electric cars than any other country. The quest for energy self-sufficiency is a big motivation for many countries. China is moving fast, and America under President Donald Trump, is securing its energy independence with oil and gas. But unlike oil and gas renewables will not increase global warming. The long term transition to clean energy will throw up new global challenges. It will create tensions in unstable parts of the Middle East as oil revenue starts to dry up. Another challenge is that wind and sun are intermittent. renewables may require vast shared electricity grids spanning boarders to make them more efficient. To stop global warming the world needs a huge collaboration over our shared energy future. If we fail, wars over scarce resources could be even worse in the 21st century than in the 20th. Daily Watch: mind-stretching short films throughout the working week. For more from Economist Films visit: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
Views: 81553 The Economist