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Calculating the global economic cost of climate change
 
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New research finds that without climate change mitigation, most countries will see an economic downturn by 2100.
Views: 5064 Stanford
Economics of climate change innovation | Bjørn Lomborg
 
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There is a smarter way to source green energy instead of subsidies. In this smart talk, political scientist Bjørn Lomborg explains why Innovation in green energy is the solution to global warming.TEDArchive presents previously unpublished talks from TED conferences. Enjoy this unedited talk by Bjørn Lomborg . Filmed at TED2014. NOTE: Comments are disabled on this video. We made this difficult decision for the TED Archive because we believe that a well-moderated conversation allows for better commentary from more people and more viewpoints. Studies show that aggressive and hateful comments silence other commenters and drive them away; unfortunately, YouTube's comment moderation tools are simply not up to the task of allowing us to monitor comments on so many videos at once. (We'd love to see this change, YouTube.) So for now, if you'd like to comment on this talk, please use Facebook, Twitter or G+ to discuss with your networks.
Views: 24763 TED Archive
Intro to Cost-Benefit Analysis
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. In this video, you will be introduced to the concept of a cost benefit analysis. You will learn the difference between decision making from the perspective of a private firm vs. a larger society and how this applies to environmental conservation. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 324035 CrashCourse
How Inequality and Climate Change Impede Sustainable Growth
 
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Join us for a panel discussion at The New School (http://newschool.edu) with policy analysts, academics, and experts on the relationship between growing inequality and climate change and the path to a sustainable solution. The "yellow vests" protest in France against fuel tax increases intended to combat climate change shows that people care about the unequal impacts—actual and perceived—of policies. Globalization and economic policies such as deregulation, free capital flows, and austerity, are perceived to have increased inequality. Policies to mitigate change and its consequences, such as disasters and damages, also pose a challenge to equity and fairness for national economies. How can we design policies to foster globalization and tackle climate change in a way that is inclusive and sustainable? How can we overcome cognitive barriers to adoption of policies for the common good? THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH | http://newschool.edu/nssr Panelists include: Dani Rodrik, Professor of International Political Economy, Harvard’s JFK School of Government Jonathan Ostry, Deputy Director of the Research Department at IMF and Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) Research Fellow Erin Hayde, Consultant for Environment & Natural Resources Global Practice at The World Bank and NSSR Economics Alum Prakash Loungani, Assistant Director of the IMF’s Independent Evaluation Office; Adjunct Professor at Vanderbilt University and American University The evening will begin with a brief presentation of the new book Confronting Inequality: How Societies Can Choose Inclusive Growth (Columbia University Press) by two of the authors, IMF economists Jonathan Ostry and Prakash Loungani. A larger panel discussion on the policies and practices that support and impede sustainable growth and fair transitions to sustainable economies will follow. This event will be live-streamed. Department of Economics | http://newschool.edu/nssr/economics The event is hosted by The New School Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis Economics of Climate Change project, headed by economist Willi Semmler and generously supported by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation. Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA) | http://economicpolicyresearch.org Presented by The New School of Social Research Thursday, February 7, 2018 6 East 16th Street, D1103 New York, NY 10003
Views: 260 The New School
William D. Nordhaus, 2018 Laureate in Economic Sciences:“From Economic Science to Climate Policy”
 
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William D. Nordhaus, was awarded the prize for his work on integrating climate change into long-run macro-economic analysis. Professor Nordhaus has spent the better part of four decades to persuade governments to address climate change. In the 1990s he became the first person to create a model that describes the global interplay between the economy and the climate. Nordhaus model is now widely used for simulations of this interplay. The model is also an important tool to examine the consequences of climate change policy interventions. The seminar is a collaboration between the Nobel Center and SNS.
Views: 351 SNSkunskap
Economic Analysis of Climate Change in Korea
 
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Speaker: Dr. Chae, Yeo-Ra, Korea Environment Institute Outline of the presentation: 1. Introduction 2. Scenarios 3. Impacts on the different sectors 4. Effects of adaptation and mitigation policies by sector 5. Integrated Analysis Results 6. Conclusions and implications
Climate change - International Economics Analysis
 
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A brief review of the implications of climate change in economy. Name: Maria Camila Gómez Méndez Universidad Sergio Arboleda Escuela de Política y Relaciones Internacionales International Economics
Views: 37 Diana Gonzalez
Cost-Benefit Discounting
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. In this video, you will learn why you discount the future in cost-benefit analysis. Concepts include discount rates, weighted average discount rates, economic opportunity costs of capital and financial vs. economic discount rates. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
Economic impact of climate change in Europe
 
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"Reducing emissions saves billions, saves lives" is a video that presents the main conclusions of Joint Research Centre's study PESETA, which investigates climate change impacts across Europe. The research integrates what is known on climate impacts in the various natural science disciplines into the economic analysis. It takes into consideration current projections on estimated CO2 emissions, the potential range of climate variations (temperature, rain, wind, solar radiation, air humidity) and the biophysical impacts (agriculture yields, river floods, and transport infrastructure losses) to assess the economic burden of potential climate scenarios. According to its conclusions, if no further action is taken and global temperature increases by 3.5°C, climate damages in the EU could amount to at least €190 billion, a net welfare loss of 1.8% of its current GDP. Several weather-related extremes could roughly double their average frequency. As a consequence, heat-related deaths could reach about 200 000, the cost of river flood damages could exceed €10 billion and 8000 km2 of forest could burn in southern Europe. The number of people affected by droughts could increase by a factor of seven and coastal damage, due to sea-level rise, could more than triple. These economic assessments are based on scenarios where the climate expected by the end of the century (2080s) occurs in the current population and economic landscape. For more information: https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/news/new-study-quantifies-effects-climate-change-europe
Economics of Climate Change. Lecture 4. Cost-Benefit analysis.
 
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@Oleg Ivanets. University of Hawaii at Manoa.
Views: 252 Oleg Ivanets
The Hidden Impacts of Climate Change
 
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Diplomats from around the world have spent more than 20 years trying unsuccessfully to hammer out a United Nations agreement on climate change. This year, which is on track to be the hottest ever recorded, they’re gathering in Paris to give it another shot. Warmer temperatures and rising seas are already changing the environment. But what sort of impact will these changes have on humans, plants, and animals? VICE News met Shyla Raghav, a UN delegate for the Maldives, an island nation threatened by rising sea levels, to discuss the issue. Watch "Who Cares About Climate Change?” - http://bit.ly/1Q0NpZa Read "With Protests Banned in Paris, Climate Activists Embrace Other Forms of Expression” - http://bit.ly/1Qewst0 Read "President Obama Wants Parts of the Climate Deal to Be Legally Binding” - http://bit.ly/1RmKVny Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 75618 VICE News
Economic Analysis of Climate Change Policies
 
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Presentation by Team-5
Views: 17 Shubham Maheshwari
Economics of Climate Change: Mark Z. Jacobson | The New School
 
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This talk explores the major environmental issues of global warming, air pollution, and energy insecurity and outlines a plan to solve them. Mark Z. Jacobson, director of the Atmosphere/Energy Program at Stanford University, considers the many facets of viable wind, water, and sunlight energy production and concludes that it could fully—and economically—power the world in the next 20 to 40 years. Jacobson and his team at Stanford University have pioneered new atmospheric research and analysis techniques that give a picture of the current state of the atmosphere, show the effects of pollution from aerosols, ethanol, agriculture, and ultraviolet radiation, and predict how these pollutants might affect the climate. Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA) | http://www.newschool.edu/scepa http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org Mark Z. Jacobson is Director of the Atmosphere/Energy Program and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University. He is a senior fellow of the Woods Institute for the Environment and of the Precourt Institute for Energy. He has written more than 120 peer-reviewed scientific journal articles including a 2009 cover article in Scientific American, co-authored with Dr. Mark DeLucchi, discussing how to power the world with renewable energy. He received the 2005 American Meteorological Society Henry G. Houghton Award for "significant contributions to modeling aerosol chemistry and to understanding the role of soot and other carbon particles on climate," and served on the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Advisory Committee to the U.S. Secretary of Energy. Department of Economics | http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/economics This event is generously supported by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the Consulate General of Germany in New York, and the Macroeconomic Policy Institute (IMK). The New School for Social Research based in New York City, offers master's and doctoral programs in anthropology, economics, philosophy, politics, psychology, and sociology; interdisciplinary master's programs in historical studies and liberal studies. THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH | http://www.newschool.edu/nssr Location: Wollman Hall, Eugene Lang Building 11/15/2012 6:00 p.m.
Views: 2754 The New School
Economic Growth, Climate Change and Environmental Limits
 
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Debate about the relationship between environmental limits and economic growth has been taking place for several decades. These arguments have re-emerged with greater intensity following advances in the understanding of the economics of climate change, increases in resource and oil prices and the re-emergence of the discussion about peak oil. These issues are addressed here by Cameron Hepburn, He is Professor of environmental economics at the University of Oxford, based at the Smith School and the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, and is also Professorial Research Fellow at the Grantham Research Institute at the London School of Economics and a Fellow of New College, Oxford. According to Professor Hepburn, the economic pessimism created by the great recession of 2008-2012 has put the spotlight back on the prospects for economic growth and invariably, the impact on the impact and climate change. But does the pursuit of growth necessitate a trade-off with the environment. In the interview ,Hepburn offers a conceptual and synthetic analysis of the relationship between economic growth and environmental limits, including those imposed by climate change. It explores two related questions. Will environmental limits, including limits on the climate system, slow or even halt economic growth? If not, how will the nature of economic growth have to shift? To be clear, Cameron Hepburn does not envisage a ‘zero growth’ world as being necessary for us to live within environmental limits, nor does he see economic growth as a problem. Rather, he maintains that stopping economic growth (which is measured in terms of value) is neither necessary nor desirable. Indeed, as far as meeting environmental challenges is concerned, it would be counterproductive; recessions have slowed and in some cases derailed efforts to adopt cleaner modes of production. Rather, large leaps in clean technology, triggering a structural shift in the way we produce and consume energy, are required. This is a ‘green growth’ rather than a ‘no growth’ world. The continuation of growth in value to humans is consistent with us living within the material constraints imposed by a finite (if very large) planet, provided that we continue to expand the "intellectual economy" through innovation, technology development, an increased focus on services and, more fundamentally, the art of living, all of which he discusses in the interview below.
Views: 9122 New Economic Thinking
Economics of Climate Change; Green is the Color of Money
 
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The government just released a new enormous report on climate change showing the many risks it poses for the US economy. Here’s a summary of the major economic risks that we’ll be facing in the coming century.
Lecture "Economics in the 21st Century: on Societal Aging and Climate Change"
 
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https://ies.keio.ac.jp/en/sp-events-fukuzawa/20190320/ Wed 20 March, 2019 the Yukichi Fukuzawa Memorial Lectures in Economics " Economics in the 21st Century: on Societal Aging and Climate Change " by Robert Engle (Professor, New York University, 2003 Nobel Prize in Economics) and Peter Diamond (MIT Emeritus Professor, 2010 Nobel Prize in Economics) --- Professor Robert Engle is an authority in time series econometrics and financial econometrics and the recipient of the 2003 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science, which is shared with Professor Clive Granger, “for methods of analyzing economic time series with time-varying volatility (ARCH).” Professor Engle received PhD in economics at Cornell University. After working at MIT and UC Berkeley, he has been at NYU since 2010 and is now Michael Armellino Professor of Management and Financial Services. His ARCH model is an indispensable tool in analyzing the price dynamics in financial markets and designing the risk management. Professor Peter Diamond is an authority in macroeconomic theory and the recipient of the 2010 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science, which is shared with Professor Dale Mortensen and Christopher Pissarides, “for their analysis of markets with search frictions.” Professor Diamond received PhD in economic at MIT. After working at UC Berkeley, he has been at MIT and has been An Institute Professor since 1997. Professor Diamond is well-known for his fundamental contributions in the overlapping generation model and the theory of optimal taxation in addition to the analysis on decentralized trades with search frictions. https://ies.keio.ac.jp/sp-events-fukuzawa/20190320/ 2019年3月20日(水) 福澤諭吉記念経済学特別講義 「21世紀の経済学:人口減少・高齢化、地球温暖化とどう向き合うか」 講師ロバート・エングル氏(ニューヨーク大学教授、2003年ノーベル経済学賞受賞)、ピーター・ダイアモンド氏(MIT名誉教授、2010年ノーベル経済学賞受賞) --- ロバート・エングル氏は、時系列分析、金融計量経済学の権威で、2003年に、不均一分散の下での時系列分析手法に関する貢献からノーベル経済学賞を受賞されました(クライブ・グレンジャー氏との共同受賞)。コーネル大学にて経済学博士号を取得したのち、MIT、カリフォルニア大学サンディエゴ校を経て、2000年からはニューヨーク大学の教授を務められております。エングル氏の開発した不均一分散モデルは、金融市場の価格変動の説明、リスク管理といった分野において必要不可欠なツールとなっています。 ピーター・ダイアモンド氏は、マクロ経済学理論の権威で、2010年に、市場におけるサーチの役割に関する分析への貢献からノーベル経済学賞を受賞されました(デール・モルテンセン氏、クリストファー・ピサリデス氏との共同受賞)。MITにて経済学博士号を取得したのち、カリフォルニア大学バークレー校を経て、1966年からはMITに在籍し、1997年からは同校の権威あるAn Institute Professorを務められております。ダイアモンド氏は、上記のサーチ理論だけでなく、最適課税や世代間の資源配分に関する分析フレームワークを構築したことでも知られています。それらはすべて、マクロ経済学の基本モデルとなっています。
#7 Economic Analysis of Climate Change Policies
 
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GROUP: OLA TEAM #4 Submitted by: Soni Aakash N01267533 Christopher Aashley Anoop N01280539 Varghese Aliyas N01279840 Philip Mintu Elsa N01279561 Kaur Vipinpreet N01271162
Views: 12 Aakash Soni
Climate economics (PG): Climate and development
 
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Lecture on the impacts of climate (change) on economic development. Covers Chapter 7 of Climate Economics textbook. Take the quiz: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1786435098/ Buy the book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Economics-Economic-Analysis-Change/dp/1782545921/ More on Climate Economics https://sites.google.com/site/climateconomics/
Views: 65 ClimateEconomics
The Economic Threat of Climate Change - Bridget Hoffman, EEA 2016
 
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Climate change could cause problems in all walks of life - what could it mean for the economy? Bridget Hoffman (IADB) explains how by comparing warmer and cooler summers across the US we can see a worst-case scenario of GDP growth being held back by a third over the next century. Filmed at the European Economic Association's 2016 Congress in Geneva. Temperature and Growth: A Panel Analysis of the United States Ric Colacito, Bridget Hoffman & Toan Phan Produced by Econ Films
William Nordhaus: The Economics of Climate Change
 
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In this informal talk, William Nordhaus, Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University and author of two widely used models of the economics of climate change, makes the case for using markets to mitigate the issue of global climate change by putting a price on pollution. If you experience technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to [email protected]
Economics of Climate Change with Professor Kabat | The New School
 
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Professor Pavel Kabat joins The New School's Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA | http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org) to present a lecture on the U.N.'s Sustainable Development Goals as part of SCEPA's Economics of Climate Change series (http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org/index.php/economics-of-climate-change). Pavel Kabat is director general and CEO of the Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Austria. Directed by Economist Willi Semmler. SCEPA's Economics of Climate Change Project is generously sponsored by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, the German Research Foundation (DFG), and the Tishman Environmental and Design Center (TEDC | http://blogs.newschool.edu/tedc). Follow the conversation on Twitter with @SCEPA_economics using #CCecon Department of Economics | http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/economics Location: Wolff Conference Room, Albert and Vera List Academic Center Monday, September 19, 2016 at 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm
Views: 628 The New School
Cost-Effective Approaches to Save the Environment, with Bjorn Lomborg
 
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Recorded on February 11, 2019. How much will it cost to slow climate change? Bjorn Lomborg, president of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, performs cost-benefit analysis on the Green New Deal and the UN’s Climate Report, analyzes the economic impact of climate change in the next century, and proposes economically feasible alternative plans to reduce climate change. Is climate change the rapidly impending apocalypse it seems? Bjorn Lomborg discusses climate change as depicted in doomsday films like The Day after Tomorrow and breaks down why it will not be an instantaneous apocalypse as often portrayed. He talks about the economic impact climate change will have on the global GDP in the next one hundred years if not solved and the impact on the global GDP if money is spent towards resolving it. He details the reasons Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s Green New Deal is not feasible in the ten-year timeline she has proposed and why, even if it were feasible, it would be prohibitively expensive. He discusses the reality of reducing the amount of energy used in developing countries and how it’s unlikely that those countries will be willing to give up on things like electricity now that they have it. Lomborg suggests that the best way to resolve climate change is to put money now towards research and development for new, cleaner sources of energy that are cheaper than coal and natural gas, because countries will be much more likely to adopt a new energy resource if it is the cheapest option. Finding cheaper energy solutions will have a positive impact on global GDP, and people will be much more willing to adopt it. He also suggests implementing a modest carbon tax, which would have a great long-term impact on reducing climate change. Related Resources • Free-Market Environmentalism • Carbon Taxes: The Most Efficient Way to Reduce Emissions • Energy Efficiency: Our Best Source of Clean Energy • Identifying Smart Climate-Change Policies • Statement Backing Hoover Fellow and Stanford Professor’s Carbon-Tax Proposal Garners Record-Setting Support from Economists • The Conservative Case for Carbon Dividends Interested in exclusive Uncommon Knowledge content? Check out Uncommon Knowledge on social media! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UncKnowledge/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/UncKnowledge/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/uncommon_knowledge_show
Views: 72350 HooverInstitution
William Nordhaus 2018 Nobel Prize Winner
 
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William Nordhaus ’63 B.A., ’72 M.A., Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University and the world’s leading economist on climate change, has been awarded the 2018 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences for “integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis.”
Views: 2857 YaleCampus
Climate economics (UG): Climate and development
 
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Lecture on climate change and economic development to third year undergraduates of economics. Covers Chapter 7 of Climate Economics textbook. Take the quiz: http://www.surveygizmo.co.uk/s3/2139649/Quiz-UG-Development Buy the book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Economics-Economic-Analysis-Change/dp/1782545921/ More on Climate Economics https://sites.google.com/site/climate...
Views: 29 ClimateEconomics
Economic Analysis of Climate Change and Building Effective Public Transportation Systems in the US
 
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Thomas Adamson Pacific University, Oregon ECON-333 Screencast
Views: 23 Thomas Adamson
Techno-Economic Analysis of Energy Generation Power Plants
 
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The course is organized as a series of lectures covering the following structured topics: 1. Energy transition and climate change 2. Techno-economic analysis of power generation plants 3. Fundamentals of thermal energy conversion and exergy analysis 4. Biomass and biogas power plants 5. Fundamentals of flow energy conversion / turbines and propulsion systems 6. Hydro and wind power generation plants 7. Fundamentals thermochemical conversion processes 8. Industrial processes for fuel production and electricity generation from biomass 9. Agroindustrial systems and carbon capture and geological storage 10. Energy planning and energy commercialization in Brazil
Views: 1480 Prof. P. Seleghim
Michael Ghil, Coupled Climate–Economics Modeling and Data Analysis - 21 January 2019
 
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Coupled Climate–Economics Modeling and Data Analysis: Endogenous Business Cycles and Fluctuation–Dissipation Theory Michael Ghil Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris, e University of California, Los Angeles Abstract: This talk will address the mathematics of non-equilibrium macroeconomics [5] and of its interaction with climate variability and climate change [1,2]. First, I will review earlier work on endogenous business cycles (EnBCs) [5] and on how they affect the impact of natural catastrophes on the economy. Based on these previous findings, I will formulate an economic version of fluctuation–dissipation theory and show that it is supported by available data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis [4]. Finally, results on the synchronization of business cycles across the world will be presented [3]. References [1] Chavez, M., M. Ghil and J. Urrutia Fucugauchi, Eds., 2015: Extreme Events: Observations, Modeling and Economics, Geophysical Monograph 214, American Geophysical Union & Wiley, 438 pp. [2] Ghil, M., 2017: The wind-driven ocean circulation: Applying dynamical systems theory to a climate problem, Discr. Cont. Dyn. Syst. – A, 37(1), 189– 228, doi:10.3934/dcds.2017008. [3] Groth, A., and M. Ghil, 2017: Synchronization of world economic activity, 27,127002 (18 pp.), http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5001820 . [4] Groth, A., P. Dumas, M. Ghil and S. Hallegatte, 2015: Impacts of natural disasters on a dynamic economy, Ch. 19 in Chavez et al. (Eds.), pp. 343–359. [5] Hallegatte, S., M. Ghil, P. Dumas, and J.-C. Hourcade, 2008: Business cycles, bifurcations and chaos in a neo-classical model with investment dynamics, J. Economic Behavior & Organization, 67, 57–77, doi: 10.1016/j.jebo.2007.05.001 .
Stern Review on Climate Change: Gary Yohe, Robert Mendelsohn
 
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Gary Yohe discusses the mitigation side of the Stern Review in light of the most recent science on climate change. Following Yohe is Robert Mendelsohn, who argues that the Stern Review is helpful, but unfinished, claiming that the Stern Review is not a real economic analysis of climate change and subsequently does not have consistent assumptions between cost and damage estimates, which is in his view its principal limitation. Afterwards, Nicholas Stern responds to both Yohe's and Mendelsohn's comments, noting points of convergence and divergence.
Views: 837 YaleUniversity
NewsX Video: Muthukumar Mani on economic impact of climate change Part-1
 
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In an exclusive interview with NewsX World Banks senior environmental economist, Muthukumar S Mani unveiled some new facts on global climate change and its economic impact on India.
Views: 116 NewsX
Global Economic Outlook
 
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What lies ahead for the global economy in 2018? Dimensions to be addressed: - Quantitative tightening and the monetary policy road ahead - Addressing low productivity in a high tech world - Managing climate change risk in economic planning · Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England; Member of the Board of Trustees, World Economic Forum · Mary Callahan Erdoes, Chief Executive Officer, Asset and Wealth Management, JPMorgan Chase & Co., USA · Haruhiko Kuroda, Governor of the Bank of Japan · Christine Lagarde, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Washington DC; Member of the Board of Trustees, World Economic Forum · Carrie Lam, Chief Executive of Hong Kong SAR Moderated by · Martin Wolf, Associate Editor and Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times, United Kingdom http://www.weforum.org/
Views: 60962 World Economic Forum
Economics of climate adaptation
 
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Seminar with Prof. Jinhua Zhao, Tuesday 7 May 2013. Read more here: http://www.stockholmresilience.org/21/seminar-and-events/stockholm-seminars/previous-seminars/2013/ss-2013/4-23-2013-economics-of-adaptation-to-global-climate-change-past-lessons-and-future-strategies.html
Risky Business:  The Economic Risks of Climate Change with Sol Hsiang -- In the Living Room
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) UC Berkeley economist Sol Hsiang details the economic risks of climate change -- region by region -- with expected jumps in mortality rates, violent crime, worker fatigue and energy consumption as the days become hotter throughout the United States. Hsiang was co-lead author of the American Climate Prospectus, the risk analysis study that led to “The Risky Business Report: The Economic Risks of Climate Change in the United States,” the bipartisan research initiative commissioned by financiers Henry Paulson, Tom Steyer and Michael Bloomberg. Using national maps that illustrate the range of the rising heat, Hsiang explains the importance of understanding these potential impacts in this conversation with Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, as part of the “In the Living Room” interview series. Recorded on 08/12/2014. Series: "In the Living Room" [9/2014] [Public Affairs] [Show ID: 28511]
Joseph Heath (Toronto), Caring about climate change implies caring about economic growth
 
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Recorded on November 15, 2016 during a Groupe de recherche en éthique environnementale et animale (GREEA) session. Abstract: In this paper, I point out a tension between two commitments that are often held jointly by environmental ethicists. First, many are concerned about the effects of global warming, and believe that we should be engaged in resolute action to achieve reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Second, many believe that continuing the growth trajectory of the global economy is both undesirable and non-obligatory. Formulated in terms of an obligation to future generations, the view is that we owe it to future generations to prevent significant anthropogenic climate change, and yet we do not owe it to future generations to ensure that they receive the benefits of a growing economy. The problem with these two positions, held jointly, is that under all of the most probable scenarios, the benefits that we could be providing to future generations through ongoing economic growth are enormous, relative to the costs that will be imposed upon them by climate change. As a result, if we are under no obligation to maximize growth – indeed, if we are permitted to pass along to future generations an economy that will permit them to achieve a standard of living no greater than what we enjoy now, then by far the least costly course of action for us is to let climate change occur, then compensate future generations for the impact by making resources available to them to cover the costs of adaptation. Since this conclusion is, I believe, unacceptable, the analysis forces us to think more seriously about the moral significance of economic growth.
Views: 992 Radio-CRÉ
Climate Thresholds and Abrupt Climate Change: What Are the Research Needs? -- Klaus Keller
 
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This presentation was the keynote address recorded at an Aspen Global Change Institute workshop entitled “Abrupt Climate Change: Mechanisms, Early Warning Signs, Impacts, and Economic Analysis” in July of 2005. The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to further the understanding of global environmental change in service of society. To search our complete video archive, explore our website at www.agci.org/videos.
ECONOMIC SURVEY (2017-18) | SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, ENERGY & CLIMATE CHANGE | PART 4
 
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INDIAN ECONOMY FOR PRELIMS IN 100 HOURS Video Link : https://youtu.be/NQgMFNCmwkA HOW TO PREPARE INDIAN ECONOMY FOR UPSC CSE PRELIMS 2018? https://youtu.be/A-acqr7u74A To download the material for this session click on : https://goo.gl/UxckFJ To join our exclusive Economy telegram channel for regular economy gyan click : https://goo.gl/RWbBM7
Views: 7065 NEO IAS
Economic Survey : Climate change 3
 
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Rahul discusses Green Finance and INDCs
Views: 378 DECIPHER IAS
Optimized operation of hydroelectric power plants
 
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A COURSE ON RENEWABLE ENERGIES AND ENERGY PLANNING - Thursday 02:00 PM The course is organized as a series of lectures covering the following structured topics: 1. Energy transition and climate change 2. Techno-economic analysis of power generation plants 3. Fundamentals of thermal energy conversion and exergy analysis 4. Biomass and biogas power plants 5. Fundamentals of flow energy conversion / turbines and propulsion systems 6. Hydro and wind power generation plants 7. Fundamentals thermochemical conversion processes 8. Industrial processes for fuel production and electricity generation from biomass 9. Agroindustrial systems and carbon capture and geological storage 10. Energy planning and energy commercialization in Brazil
Views: 587 Prof. P. Seleghim
Rapid Climate Change -- William Richard Peltier
 
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Rapid Climate Change, the Intensity of the Atlantic MOC and High-Lattitude Low Lattitude Teleconnections: Evidence from Paleoclimatology -- William Richard Peltier This presentation was recorded at an Aspen Global Change Institute workshop entitled “Abrupt Climate Change: Mechanisms, Early Warning Signs, Impacts, and Economic Analysis” in July of 2005. The Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with the mission to further the understanding of global environmental change in service of society. To search our complete video archive, explore our website at www.agci.org/videos.
Financing the Transition to Low-Carbon Economy with Nebojsa Nakicenovic | The New School
 
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Climate change demands change - technological, economic, social. As we face these transitions, the question remains, how do we pay for it? The event is sponsored by the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA | http://economicpolicyresearch.org), SCEPA's Economics of Climate Change project (http://economicpolicyresearch.org/index.php/economics-of-climate-change), and the Fordham University Fordham Law School. The event is also generously supported by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation, The New School's Tishman Center for Environment and Design (TEDC | http://newschool.edu/tedc), and the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET). Nebojsa Nakicenovic, Deputy Director General of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), will join SCEPA and the Fordham School of Law to discuss how to finance the pathway to global sustainability. As an international leader on economic development in response to climate change, Nakicenovic contributed to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), authored over 300 scientific publications, and has degrees from Princeton University, the University of Vienna, and the Russian Academy of Sciences. The talk will be followed by a panel discussion on the economic, legal and financial consequences of climate change mitigation and adaptation with Fordham Law School's Clinical Professor of Law Paolo Galizzi, director of the Sustainable Development Legal Initiative and The New School's Economics Professor Willi Semmler, director of SCEPA's Economics of Climate Change project. Welcoming remarks will be provided by Linda Sugin, Fordham School of Law's Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Professor of Law. Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA) works to bring reality into conventional economics. An economic policy think tank within the department of economics at The New School, we provide scholars, non-profits, and government officials with research on key policy issues. The Sustainable Development Legal Initiative (SDLI) promotes the use of law to foster environmentally sound development and poverty eradication. Within Fordham Law School and its Leitner Center, SDLI serves as a focal point for activities in the field of international sustainable development. THE NEW SCHOOL | http://newschool.edu Location: Fordham University, Fordham School of Law September 20, 2017 at 4:00pm
Views: 300 The New School
Economic Considerations: Cost-Effective and Efficient Climate Policies
 
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) Max Auffhammer of UC Berkeley looks at the economics of climate change, listing the economic considerations that are important to take into account when designing and evaluating climate policy, including cost effectiveness and efficiency. Then he discusses specific policies at the state, national and international level in light of these economic considerations. Recorded on 10/26/2015. Series: "UC Carbon and Climate Neutrality Summit: UC Climate Solutions" [2/2016] [Public Affairs] [Science] [Show ID: 30287]
Termodynamics: Exergy Analysis Biomass Power Plant with Production Supercritical CO2
 
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Exergy Analysis of a Biomass Power Plant with Supercritical CO2 Production for Geological Storage The course is organized as a series of lectures covering the following structured topics: 1. Energy transition and climate change 2. Techno-economic analysis of power generation plants 3. Fundamentals of thermal energy conversion and exergy analysis 4. Biomass and biogas power plants 5. Fundamentals of flow energy conversion / turbines and propulsion systems 6. Hydro and wind power generation plants 7. Fundamentals thermochemical conversion processes 8. Industrial processes for fuel production and electricity generation from biomass 9. Agroindustrial systems and carbon capture and geological storage 10. Energy planning and energy commercialization in Brazil
Views: 817 Prof. P. Seleghim
World Economic Forum Debate: Stepping Up Climate Action
 
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Climate change is a reality that we cannot ignore anymore, a reality that is set to impact our lives and the lives of our future generations. Is there enough being done to avoid this disaster? Its time for leaders from governments and the corporate world to rise up to the challenge and commit to the Paris Agreement. Its time to garner political will, its time to raise public awareness to solve this crisis that threatens our very existence. Watch full video: https://www.ndtv.com/video/news/ndtv-davos/world-economic-forum-debate-stepping-up-climate-action-477407?yt NDTV is one of the leaders in the production and broadcasting of un-biased and comprehensive news and entertainment programmes in India and abroad. NDTV delivers reliable information across all platforms: TV, Internet and Mobile. Subscribe for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/ndtv?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ndtv Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ndtv Download the NDTV Apps: http://www.ndtv.com/page/apps Watch more videos: http://www.ndtv.com/video?yt
Views: 3693 NDTV
Americans William Nordhaus and Paul Romer win 2018 Nobel Economics Prize
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now: http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN Americans William Nordhaus and Paul Romer won the 2018 Nobel Economics Prize for work in integrating climate change and technological innovation into economic analysis, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said on Monday. Visit our website: http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 3007 FRANCE 24 English
Economic advantage of investing in smallholder agriculture under climate change
 
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A new report presented at the UN Climate Talks in Marrakech (Nov 2016) shared new financial evidence and analysis including likely returns on investment to women and men smallholder farmers. Panellists from Africa and Asia provided numbers and insights from current country-level investments in adaptation and mitigation in agriculture. See more information: https://ccafs.cgiar.org/cop22-side-event-economic-advantage-agriculture-ndcs Interviews with Sonja Vermeulen (CCAFS), Ilaria Firmian (IFAD), and Imelda Bacudo (GIZ-ASEAN). Video produced by IISD.
Tim Jackson: Prosperity Without Growth
 
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So much of the analysis of how we respond to climate change assumes that economic growth and emissions reduction are compatible goals. But is this wishful thinking? To question maximising economic growth as an organising principle of society seems close to economic heresy. Enter Tim Jackson, a professor of Sustainable Development and author of the book, "Prosperity Without Growth". He argues it's time to re-think the very notion of growth and what it means to be genuinely prosperous. Jackson is speaking as part of the 2010 Alfred Deakin Lecture series, "Brave New World?". Curated by Tim Flannery, the 2010 Deakins presents the climate change challenge from ten different perspectives, with a focus on ten different spheres of life. Are we, the series asks, willing to take the hard personal, political and economic choices that will truly reduce emissions? Are we brave enough to make the changes -- in thought and deed -- that are required of us? Are we able to shape this new world, or will it shape us? The Deakins were started in May 2001, as part of the celebrations surrounding the Centenary of Federation. Some of Australia's top thinkers came together with key international guests to present their ideas about the nature and future of a civil society. The lecture series was named to honour the legacy of Alfred Deakin, Australia's second Prime Minister, a humanist and nation-builder whose social vision put in place much of Australia's political and social infrastructure. Tim Jackson is Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey and Director of the Research Group on Lifestyles, Values and Environment (RESOLVE). Since 2004, Jackson has been Economics Commissioner on the UK Sustainable Development Commission and is the author of their controversial and groundbreaking report, now updated and expanded in the book, "Prosperity Without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet". In addition to his academic work, he is an award-winning playwright with numerous radio-writing credits for the BBC.
Views: 21518 Ian McPherson