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What is a Coupon
 
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In the financial world, “coupon” represents the interest rate on a bond. Typically the coupon is paid semi-annually. Coupon is short for “coupon rate” or “coupon percentage rate.” The use of the word coupon to describe the interest rate on a bond is derived from the fact that bonds used to be issued in physical, paper, form. Attached to the bonds were coupons that had to be removed from the bond and redeemed with the issuer in order to receive the interest payment. Bond owners literally had to “clip” the coupon off the bond. Coupon is sometimes used in reference to retired investors who have most of their wealth in fixed income securities and spend their retirement years clipping coupons. for more info: ttps://www.facebook.com/groups/478665558952936/
Views: 10694 Investment for Life
Face value, Coupon and Maturity of Bonds - SmarterWithMoney
 
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Investing in bonds can be tricky in today's market. Understanding the fundamental concepts associated with bonds is a good place to start.
Views: 21419 Religare
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 482042 Khan Academy
Coupon Bond Valuation: Basics
 
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Valuing a Coupon Bond. This is an extension of the previous video on "What is a Bond?" A knowledge of the time value of money is necessary. For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 2570 Harpett
What does Coupon Rate mean?
 
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The coupon rate is the annual interest rate paid on a bond. It is represented as a percentage of the bond's face value. This video provides a brief explanation of what coupon rate means, and provides a visual example of how it is typically used and calculated. Learn more at: http://marketbusinessnews.com/financial-glossary/coupon-rate/
Views: 4123 Market Business News
Bonds  Calculate Coupon Rate
 
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how to calculate coupon rate on a bond examples using excel and financial calculator
Views: 17173 Elinda Kiss
Why Bond Prices and Yields are Inversely Related
 
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Help us make better videos: http://www.informedtrades.com/donate Trade stocks and bonds with Scottrade, the broker Simit uses: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT (see our review: http://bit.ly/scottrade-IT2) KEY POINTS 1. Bond prices and bond yields move in opposite directions. When bond prices go up, that means yields are going down; when bond prices go down, this means yields are going up. Mathematically, this is because yield is equal to: annual coupon payments/price paid for bond A decrease in price is thus a decrease in the denominator of the equation, which in turn results in a larger number. 2. Conceptually, the reason for why a decrease in bond price results in an increase bond yields can be understood through an example. a. Suppose a corporation issues a bond to a bondholder for $100, and with a promise of $5 in coupon payments per year. This bond thus has a yield of 5%. ($5/$100 = 5%) b. Suppose the same corporation then issues additional bonds, also for $100 but this time promising $6 in coupon payments for year -- and thus yielding 6%. No rational investor would choose the old bond; instead, they would all purchase the new bond, because it yielded more and was at the same price. As a result, if a holder of the old bonds needed to sell them, he/she would need to do so at a lower price. For instance, if holder of the old bonds was willing to sell it at $83.33, than any prospective buyer would get a bond that earned $5 in coupon payments on an $83.33 payment -- effectively an annual yield of 6% (5/83.33). The yield to maturity could be even higher, since the bond would give the bondholder $100 upon reaching maturity. 3. The longer the duration of the bonds, the more sensitivity there is to interest rate moves. For instance, if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 30 year bond (meaning there are 27 years left until maturity) the price of the bond would fall more than if interest rates rise in year 3 of a 5 year bond. This is because an interest in interest rates reduces the relative appeal of existing coupon payments, and the more coupon payments that are remaining, the more interest rate fluctuations will impact the price of the bond. 4. Lastly, a small note on jargon: when investors or commentators say, "bonds are up," (or down) they are referring to bond prices. "Bonds are up" thus means bond prices are up and yields are down; conversely, "bonds are down" means bond prices are down and yields are up.
Views: 56994 InformedTrades
How to Price/Value Bonds - Formula, Annual, Semi-Annual, Market Value, Accrued Interest
 
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http://www.subjectmoney.com http://www.subjectmoney.com/definitiondisplay.php?word=Bond%20Pricing In this video we show you how to calculate the value or price of a bond. We teach you the present value formula and then use examples to discount the coupon payments and principle payment to their present value. We also show you how to solve the price of a semi-annual bond. In this case you would multiply the periods by two and divide the YTM and coupon payments by 2. We also show you how to solve the accrued interest of a bond to find out what it would sell for at a date that is not on the exact coupon payment date. https://www.youtube.com/user/Subjectmoney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zCqoED8MVk http://www.roofstampa.com hjttp://roofstampa.com http:/www.subjectmoney.com http://www.excelfornoobs.com
Views: 77792 Subjectmoney
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 469781 Khan Academy
Investopedia Video: Zero-Coupon Bond
 
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A debt security that doesn't pay interest (a coupon) but is traded at a deep discount, rendering profit at maturity when the bond is redeemed for its full face value. For more Investopedia videos, check out; http://www.investopedia.com/video/
Views: 47225 Investopedia
Calculating the Yield of a Coupon Bond using Excel
 
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UPDATE: You can also find the YTM by trial and error. If you plug in 0.06 for the YTM in the equation this gives you $91,575, which is lower than $92,227. YTM = 0.058 gives you $92,376, which is a little bit higher than $92,227. YTM = 0.0585 gives you $92,175, but YTM = 0.0584 gives you $92,215 which is very close to $92,227. Thus, 5.84% is the approximate YTM This video explains how to calculate the yield-to-maturity of a coupon bond. A comprehensive example is provided that shows the formula for calculating the yield, but the video also provides a Microsoft Excel formula that provides an easier means of determining the yield. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 68982 Edspira
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 270761 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Coupon Bond Price
 
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Calculate the price of a coupon bond.
Views: 12172 John Redden
PV of semiannual coupon bonds in Excel
 
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For bonds that pay interest on a semiannual basis, we have to adjust the number of periods (multiply times 2), the yield (divide by 2), and the coupon payment (divide by 2).
Views: 3264 pjcalafi
4 Usual Confusions in Bond Valuation: Tutorial for Bond Value in Valuing Bonds (super easy)
 
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OMG wow! I'm SHOCKED how easy! Clicked here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE-vj43wHOQ No wonder others goin crazy sharing this??? What amount is best to be willing to pay for a bond? A bond's value is driven by impending cash flows you are likely to generate by possessing the bond. Where do the prospective cash flows come from? They come from 1) the coupon payments which symbolize cash earnings for the owner of the bond, and 2) the remuneration of principal ("face value" of the bond).Utilizing the Bond Valuation Formula and presuming a 5% level of interest from a bank, a bond that has a $1,000 face value and 4% coupon rate which might grant you $4 annually for 7 years plus enable you to recoup the $1,000 face value after 7 years should in truth maintain a fair value of $941... which happens to be obviously less than the $1,000 face value. Thus even if the face value is $1,000, you must be prepared to pay a maximum of only $941 to obtain this bond.(The formula is a bit complicated and concerns an abundance of aspects, such as the yield or yield to maturity, remaining time until maturity, not to mention different variables. You ordinarily don't need to actually do calculations by yourself if you're not in business school. There are loads of accessible calculators via the internet.)What exactly does the $941 earlier mentioned suggest? If you should pay more than $941 for this bond, you would be better off depositing your dollars in the bank instead. Put differently, in case you compensate beyond $941, your rate of return for maintaining this bond could possibly be under the bank interest rate of 5%. Consequently... it would be preferable to deposit in the bank.So when a bond is obtained or sold, is it acquired or sold at the face value or at the fair value?For the most part, if it happens to be the first time a bond is being issued and sold by the issuing firm in the primary bond market, it is carried out with the face value. However, in the secondary market, in the event the bond is purchased or sold by unique people, it is exchanged at market value, which is often differ from both the face value and fair value. The market value is basically what true persons are prepared to pay or deal for the bond, whether or not this is much less or greater than the face value and/or fair value. Normally though, the market value is nearer to the fair value than to the face value. Take into account however, that in the secondary market, a large component which impacts bond price is risk as symbolized by its credit rating, and this factor is not covered in the formula used to find out how to value a bond which has been referred to above. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE-vj43wHOQ http://mbabullshit.com/blog/bond-valuation-in-35-minutes/
Views: 77931 MBAbullshitDotCom
Actuarial Exam 2/FM Prep: Bond Price Between Coupon Payments (with Semi-Theoretical Method)
 
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Financial Math for Actuarial Exam 2 (FM), Video #115. Exercise 4.1.17 from "Mathematics of Investment and Credit", 6th Edition, by Samuel A. Broverman.
Views: 221 Bill Kinney
Investopedia Video: Bond Yields - Current Yield and YTM
 
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The current yield and yield to maturity (YTM) are two popular bond yield measures. The current yield tells investors what they will earn from buying a bond and holding it for one year. The yield to maturity (YTM) is the bond's anticipated return if held until it matures.
Views: 85147 Investopedia
What is a Bond | by Wall Street Survivor
 
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What is a bond? Learn more at: https://www.wallstreetsurvivor.com A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to a corporate entity or government. The funds are borrowed for a defined period of time at either a variable or fixed interest rate. If you want a guaranteed money-maker, bonds are a much safer option than most. There are many times of bonds, however, and each type has a different risk level. Unlike stocks, which are equity instruments, bonds are debt instruments. When bonds are first issued by the company, the investor/lender typically gives the company $1,000 and the company promises to pay the investor/lender a certain interest rate every year (called the Coupon Rate), AND, repay the $1,000 loan when the bond matures (called the Maturity Date). For example, GE could issue a 30 year bond with a 5% coupon. The investor/lender gives GE $1,000 and every year the lender receives $50 from GE, and at the end of 30 years the investor/ lender gets his $1,000 back. Bonds di er from stocks in that they have a stated earnings rate and will provide a regular cash flow, in the form of the coupon payments to the bondholders. This cash flow contributes to the value and price of the bond and affects the true yield (earnings rate) bondholders receive. There are no such promises associated with common stock ownership. After a bond has been issued directly by the company, the bond then trades on the exchanges. As supply and demand forces start to take effect the price of the bond changes from its initial $1,000 face value. On the date the GE bond was issued, a 5% return was acceptable given the risk of GE. But if interest rates go up and that 5% return becomes unacceptable, the price of the GE bond will drop below $1,000 so that the effective yield will be higher than the 5% Coupon Rate. Conversely, if interest rates in general go down, then that 5% GE Coupon Rate starts looking attractive and investors will bid the price of the bond back above $1,000. When a bond trades above its face value it is said to be trading at a premium; when a bond trades below its face value it is said to be trading at a discount. Understanding the difference between your coupon payments and the true yield of a bond is critical if you ever trade bonds. Confused? Don't worry check out the video and head over to http://courses.wallstreetsurvivor.com/invest-smarter/
Views: 112512 Wall Street Survivor
3 Minutes! Bond Valuation Explained and How to Value a Bond
 
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OMG wow! Clicked here http://mbabullshit.com I'm shocked how easy, bond valuation video.. What is a Bond? Basically, a bond is a certificate which proves that a company borrowed money from you and now owes you money. Owning a bond is a way to earn interest payments instead of putting your money in a bank. Therefore, if a bond can give you high interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, a bond value should be high. On the other hand, if a bond will give you small coupon payments compared to bank interest, the bond value should be low. A bond can be bought either from the original company which issues the bond, or from people who already bought the bond from the corporation, but who want to sell the bond before it expires because they don’t want to wait too long before they get back their original investment So to find the theoretical value of a bond, we need to think about the bond’s interest coupon payments compared to bank interest payments, the bond’s face value, and the length of time before maturity when you get back the full face value of the bond. Sears Bond photo credit: Tom Spree via Wikipedia Creative Commons
Views: 79318 MBAbullshitDotCom
Bonds - Coupon and Market Rates Differ
 
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Lesson discussing how the value of a bond changes when coupon rates and market rates differ. Looks at why a bond will trade at a premium, discount, or at par For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 3350 Harpett
Q.Bond Valuation: Semiannual Coupon 1
 
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For more questions, problem sets, and additional content please see: www.Harpett.com. Video by Chase DeHan, Assistant Professor of Finance at the University of South Carolina Upstate.
Views: 2924 Harpett
How to Calculate the Issue Price of a Bond (Semiannual Interest Payments)
 
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This video shows how to calculate the issue price of a bond that pays semiannual interest. The issue price is the sum of: (1) the present value of the face value of the bond, which is to be paid when the bond matures, and (2) the present value of the interest payments. Because the bond pays interest semiannually, the interest rate should be divided by two and the number of periods should be adjusted (e.g., if it is a 10-year bond, there would be 20 periods because interest is paid twice a year). The video provide formulas to calculate the present values and illustrates the computations using an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 13889 Edspira
Bond Pricing, Valuation, Formulas, and Functions in Excel
 
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Excel Forum: https://www.teachexcel.com/talk/microsoft-office?src=yt Excel Tutorials: https://www.teachexcel.com/src=yt This tutorial will show you how to calculate bond pricing and valuation in excel. This teaches you how to do so through using the NPER() PMT() FV() RATE() and PV() functions and formulas in excel. To follow along with this tutorial and download the spreadsheet used and or to get free excel macros, keyboard shortcuts, and forums, go to: http://www.TeachMsOffice.com
Views: 168120 TeachExcel
How bonds work
 
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Investing can sometimes seem like either like a gamble or very dull. At the "gambling" end of the spectrum are shares, with the possibility of swift ups in price and swift drops in price. At the other end is cash in the bank -- a predictable investment with few changes day-to-day or month-on-month. Investors looking for a middle ground and looking to diversify do have other options. They can consider bonds. Bonds are something of a mystery to many people -- perhaps because they are not often talked about. But bonds can play an important role in managing investments. They can be a half way house between the risk of shares and property and the safety of cash. How do bonds work? At the most basic level, a bond is a loan. Or, more technically, it is a large loan that has been split into packages and sold to investors. Bond holders typically make money by receiving regular payments of interest (known as coupons) during the life of the loan. When the loan ends, their original investment is returned. Bonds may have lives of just a year or two or for 10, 20 or even 30 years. You can buy individual bonds or opt for units in a bond fund run by an asset manager. Like shares, bonds or bond funds can usually be sold at any time and the value of your investment may rise or fall. But bond prices usually move less than shares. That is why they are considered safer than shares but they are more risky than a bank deposit. The original investment and the coupon payments are secure for bonds, while with shares, there is no guarantee of receiving dividend payments -- or your original investment. Looking a bit more closely, there are two main types of bonds -- corporate bonds and government bonds. Corporate bonds are loans made by companies. Government bonds are loans made by governments. Corporate bonds are more risky because the company issuing the bond may go bankrupt. In bankruptcy, though, bond holders are paid before shareholders. Governments rarely go bankrupt so government bonds are safer than corporate bonds. And the lower interest rate on government bonds reflects this. Getting more technical, different types of bonds are designed to work in different financial conditions. In particular, index-linked bonds pay coupons and the original investment in a way that compensates for inflation. The can be attractive to investors who want to ensure the value of their investment does not fall if prices rise. Bonds don't have to be part of your investment portfolio. Some people are happy to invest exclusively in shares and property but if you want to spread your investment risk, if you want to diversify, remember that there is always a half way house in bonds.
Views: 86149 ING eZonomics
Level I CFA® Tutorial: Fixed Income - Reinvestment Assumption in Calculating Yield to Maturity: YTM
 
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Download Fixed Income Question Bank: http://www.edupristine.com/ca/free-10-day-course/cfa-fixed-income/ http://www.edupristine.com - KickStart your CFA® prep with EduPristine. Get free consultation from our experts, drop a mail at: [email protected] CFA® is considered as the global passport to the world of finance. The CFA® Program bridges industry practice, investment theory, and ethical and professional standards to provide investment analysis and portfolio management skills. Subscribe for more updates: http://www.youtube.com/user/edupristine?sub_confirmation=1 For more videos log onto http://www.youtube.com/edupristine Find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/edupristine Find us on google plus https://plus.google.com/112352201586522582395/posts Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/edupristine YTM (Yield to Maturity): of a bond or other fixed-interest security, such as gilts, is the internal rate of return (IRR, overall interest rate) earned by an investor who buys the bond today at the market price, assuming that the bond will be held until maturity, and that all coupon and principal payments will be made on schedule. About EduPristine: Trusted by Fortune 500 Companies and 10,000 Students from 40+ countries across the globe, EduPristine is one of the leading Training provider for Finance Certifications like CFA®, PRM, FRM, Financial Modeling etc. EduPristine strives to be the trainer of choice for anybody looking for Finance Training Program across the world.
Views: 3139 EduPristine
Bonds - Semiannual interest payments - Example 1
 
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In this video, you will learn how to find the value of bonds when interest is paid annually, semiannually and quarterly.
Views: 4106 maxus knowledge
Bonds Pricing MS Excel
 
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Alexander from Poland has this question: "Five years ago, Highland, Inc. issued a corporate bond with an annual coupon of $6,000, paid at the rate of $3,000 every six months, and a maturity of 10 years. The par (face) value of the bond is $1,000,000. Recently, however, the company has run into some financial difficulty and has restructured its obligations.Today's coupon payment has already been paid, but the remaining coupon payments will be postponed until maturity. The postponed payments will accrue interest at an annual rate of 5% per year and will be paid as a lump sum amount at maturity along with the face value. The discount rate on the renegotiated bonds, now considered much riskier, has gone from 7% prior to the renegotiations to 15% per annum with the announcement of the restructuring. What is the price at which the new renegotiated bond should be selling today? (Recall that the compounding interval is 6 months and the YTM, like all interest rates, is reported on an annualized basis.)" 1. We create a proper time-line for 10 years divided into 20 periods because of the 6-months nature of coupons 2. We determine the start of the default period i.e. when the company is unable to pay the coupons 3. We treat the final lumpsum payment as coupons using 10 periods and 5%/2 as interest rate and calculate their future value 4. We add the $1Million face value to the above value in point 3 5. Finally we calculate the Present Value or PV of $1,033,610.15 6. The result is $501,501.37 which was confirmed as correct. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrtkoWJou3o
Views: 4160 Dinesh Kumar Takyar
What is a Bond? | What are Bonds?
 
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Scientific Wealth Manager https://en.samt.ag/user-registration What are Bonds? A bond is the most common type of fixed-income security, it is a debt instrument that makes a series of fixed interest payments regularly, and pays the principal amount on the maturity date. Entities such as governments and corporations issue bonds to finance various projects. At its core a bond is just a loan that investors make to the bond’s issuers. When the bond is first issued its value is basically the amount being loaned, called the face value of the bond. In exchange for this loan the investor gets regular interest, known as the coupon. Bonds are issued for a specified period. This duration can be a year, three years, five years, 30 years and above. When the bond matures, the issuer repays the loan to the investor. Then there are quasi-government entities. These entities are not under direct obligation of a central bank or the national governments. For instance, the Federal National Mortgage Association or Fannie Mae. Supranational entities operate globally. The European investment Bank, The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank are some examples. Then there are bonds that do not have a maturity date called, perpetual bonds. They pay interest, but don't carry any promises of repaying the principal amount. The par value of a bond is a principal amount that is repaid to the investor at maturity. It is also known by other terms such as face value and redemption value. Par value is quoted as a percentage of par. For instance, a bond with a par value of $1000, quoted at 98, will be selling for $980. Some bonds pay annual coupons while there are those that pay semiannual, quarterly or monthly interest payments. A $1000 par value semiannual pay bond with 5% coupon will pay 2.5% of $1000 or $25 every six months. Please note that there are bonds whose coupon rate varies throughout their tenure. If a bond has a fixed coupon rate it's called plain-vanilla bond or conventional bond. There are special types of bonds that do not pay any coupon payment before maturity, called pure discount or zero-coupon bonds. Such bonds are sold at a discount to par value, hence the term pure discount. The interest accumulates till maturity, then it is repaid to the investor along with the par value. For instance, a 10 year $1000 zero-coupon bond with 7% yield would initially sell at around $500, and then it will pay $1000 to the bondholder at maturity. As there are different currencies, so are the bonds denominated in those currencies. A dual currency bond makes coupon payments in one currency and repays the principal in another. While a currency option bond gives the investor or the bondholder a choice to choose a pair of currencies in which they would like to receive payments. Bonds are subject to different regulations and legal requirements, which depend on factors such as their place of issue and the place where they are traded at. A bond issued by a firm domiciled in a country, and also traded in that country's currency is called a domestic bond. If a firm, incorporated in a foreign country, issues a bond that trades on the national bond market of another country in that country's currency is called a foreign bond. For instance, if a foreign firm issues bonds denominated in yuan (yoo-an) that trade in China, are foreign bonds, and are known as panda bonds. Similarly, if a firm is incorporated outside of the United States and issues a bond denominated in US dollar and trades in the United States it’s also a foreign bond, known as a Yankee bond. Euro bonds are issued outside the jurisdiction of any one country, and denominated in a currency different from the currency of the countries in which these are sold. Initially, Eurobonds were created to avoid US regulations. These bonds should not be confused with bonds denominated in euro currency or domiciled in Europe, although they can be both. An example of a Eurobond would be a bond issued by a Chinese firm denominated in the Japanese yen and traded in markets outside of Japan. Global bonds are sold inside as well as outside the country in whose currency they are denominated. For instance, a dollar global bond will trade in New York which will be its domestic bond market as well as in Tokyo which will be its Eurobond market. Euro bonds are known by the currency they are denominated in for instance a Eurobond denominated in US dollar is called a Eurodollar bond, similarly a euro yen bond is denominated in yen. Most euro bonds are issued in bearer form, which means that their ownership is evidenced simply by the possession of the bonds. In registered bonds however, the ownership is recorded. Hence, bearer bonds are more popular among folks looking to avoid taxes.
FRM: TI BA II+ to compute bond yield (YTM)
 
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Given four inputs (price, term/maturity, coupon rate, and face/par value), we can use the calculator's I/Y to find the bond's yield (yield to maturity). For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 108820 Bionic Turtle
Bond Issuance Examples
 
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Roger Philipp, CPA, CGMA, presents a basic bond issue with a face value of $1 million, term of 5 years, and stated or coupon rate of 8% in the video 11.01 - Bond Issuance Examples. He also shows the journal entries for issuance and interest payments at market rates or effective rates of 8%, then 10%, and then 6%. If the bond is issued to yield 8%, then the bond is issued at par and interest expense will equal the interest payment. If the effective interest rate is 10% then the bond is issued at a discount. Now interest expense will no longer equal the cash coupon interest paid. Roger explains how to set up the journal entry, keeping things simple for now with straight-line amortization of the bond discount. Roger continues the problem by showing in the journal entry how the issuer’s interest expense will equal the market rate of 10%. Finally, Roger walks through the journal entries for this 8% face rate bond issued at a premium with a yield of 6%. As an advanced bonus, Roger has us consider the effects of the bond interest payments on the statement of cash flows. Connect with us: Website: https://www.rogercpareview.com Blog: https://www.rogercpareview.com/blog Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RogerCPAReview Twitter: https://twitter.com/rogercpareview LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/roger-cpa-review Are you accounting faculty looking for FREE CPA Exam resources in the classroom? Visit our Professor Resource Center: https://www.rogercpareview.com/professor-resource-center/ Video Transcript Sneak Peek: Now, next page it says issuance of bonds example and we're going to go through this example. Face value of the bonds, million dollars. Term, five year versus what? Term versus serial bond which matures in installments. Stated interest rate 8%. That's how much cash I'm going to get. I'm going to get 8% of a million dollars or $80,000 in cash but what am I earning? That's a different question. Then it says effective or market or yield is eight in example A, ten in example B, six in example C. Notice that we're going to be doing three examples. One is going to be eight, eight which is issued at par, issued at face. We don't have to worry about the discounted premium then we'll go to a discount example, then we'll go to a premium example and then life will be beautiful for you, things will make sense.
Views: 23406 Roger CPA Review
Bond maturity and duration
 
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Bond maturity and duration Duration vs. maturity Because interest rate risk is perhaps your most important consideration in bond investing, and since interest rate risk increases with longer-term bonds, looking at the maturity date of a bond is one way to measure risk in bond investments. But instead of looking only at maturity dates, many bond investors look at something called the duration of a bond to further quantify their interest rate risk. Duration is always less than the maturity of a bond The duration of a bond is related to the maturity of the bond, but the duration is always less than or equal to the maturity of a bond. The duration of a bond is a sort of weighted average of all the future payments offered by the bond. Most bonds make interest payments during the life of the bond and then return their face value when the bond matures. The intervening interest payments are called coupon payments. Coupon payments Back in the good old days, when bonds were issued in paper bearer form and not electronically registered form, bond investors could claim their interest payments by clipping a coupon from the paper bond. This paper coupon was honored by banks like a check. Computers and the IRS' desire to track interest payments put an end to paper coupons on bonds, but the terminology of "coupon payments" persists to this day. High coupons reduce duration Anyway, high coupon payments reduce the duration of a bond. Early repayment of principal, often called a sinking fund, also reduces a bond's duration. So what's the big deal about a bond's duration? A bond's interest rate risk is proportional to its duration. Higher duration bonds face higher interest rate risk. Let's illustrate this with an example. Take two bonds that both mature in 10 years. One makes semi-annual interest payments equal to the current market rate of 10 percent and repays its face value of $1,000 at maturity. The other bond is sold initially at a deep discount to its face value. It makes no interest payments for 10 years, but at the end of 10 years it pays the full face value of $1,000. This is a so-called zero coupon bond and is similar to a US EE savings bond. Because the first bond makes intervening coupon payments, it has a duration of about 6.5 years. The zero coupon bond has a duration of 10 years. Because of its longer duration, the zero coupon bond is almost twice as sensitive to changes in interest rates as the first bond, although they both have the same maturity date. It's easy to see why the coupon bond has lower interest rate risk. Say interest rates suddenly increased. You could take the coupon payments from the first bond and reinvest them at the higher rate, thus cutting your losses. With the zero coupon bond, you're locked into the lower interest rate until the bond matures. Copyright 1997 by David Luhman
Views: 6653 MoneyHop.com
Coupon (bond)
 
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A coupon payment on a bond is a periodic interest payment that the bondholder receives during the time between when the bond is issued and when it matures. Coupons are normally described in terms of the coupon rate, which is calculated by adding the total amount of coupons paid per year and dividing by the bond's face value. For example, if a bond has a face value of $1,000 and a coupon rate of 5%, then it pays total coupons of $50 per year. For the typical bond, this will consist of semi-annual payments of $25 each. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 237 Audiopedia
What Is A Coupon In Finance?
 
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A bond selling at par has a coupon rate such that the is worth an amount. Definition of 'coupon rate' the economic times. Coupon (bond) wikipediawhat is a bond coupon and how did it get its name? The balance. Coupon definition & example. Coupon payments financial definition of coupon. What are coupon and current bond yield all about? Dummiesboundless finance lumen learning. One of a number small detachable certificates calling for periodic personal finance investing bonds; What are coupon and current bond yield all about? The yield, or the rate, is part offering par value means stated face in accounting. Investinganswers coupon investopedia terms c. How to calculate a coupon payment 7 steps (with pictures)zero bond value formula and calculator financial what is zero bond? Thestreet definition. The abcs of zero coupon bonds clip the define at dictionary. Coupon definition & example coupon financial of. Basics of bonds maturity, coupons and yieldcoupon clipping the financial encyclopedia. The annual interest rate paid on a bond, expressed as percentage of the face value in finance world, coupon is bond. Customarily, coupons are oct 24, 2016 the term 'bond coupon' is an anachronistic holdout from past when automated and simplified much of financial world, investors who coupon rate calculated on bond's face value (or par value), not government companies issue bonds to raise money finance their feb 2, 2017 two parts gathering bond informationcalculating paymentcommunity q&a amount each payment depends terms bond, knowing how categories aug 4, 2013 used come with detachable that could be cashed in for interest due securities industry & markets association a zero sometimes referred as pure discount or simply does pay payments instead pays get definition 'zero bond' thestreet's dictionary literacy basics maturity, yield annual paid issuer's borrowed money, mar 27, terms, clipping. Asp url? Q webcache. The removal of interest coupons attached to a bearer bond so that the might submit them bank zero coupon bonds are traded on recognized financial markets and exchanges, which may offer investors liquidity in event they choose not hold feb 2, 2012 clipping isn't what it used be, be sure do your homework today as term commonly thrown around press definition, portion certificate, ticket, label, advertisement, or like, finance. What is coupon payments? Meaning of a payment on bond periodic interest that the bondholder receives external links[edit]herbstman memorial collection american finance dedicated to preserving visual history nation's debt in marketing, ticket or document can be redeemed for financial discount rebate when purchasing product. Googleusercontent search. It is ex
Views: 29 Hadassah Hartman
What Is The Coupon Rate On A Bond?
 
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Yield rate vs coupon. 8% yield free math help. Definition coupon rate is the of interest paid by bond issuers on bond's face value. It is the periodic rate of interest paid by bond issuers to its purchasers term coupon used have a much more literal meaning than it does today. Coupon rate investopediahow does a bond's coupon interest affect its price? Definition of 'coupon rate' the economic times. The stated interest rate appearing on the face of bond. Coupon rate definition & example bond coupon the strategic cfo. The coupon rate of ten percent is fixed because it based on the par value, or face bond stated interest a income security like. Coupons are normally described in terms of the coupon rate, which is this same as interest rate you requested. For example, a bond issued with face value of that pays $25 coupon semi annually has rate 5. If the price is par at time of purchase and you receive 24 oct 2016 during a low interest rate environment, any acquire older bonds that have higher bond coupons, will actually pay more than if expressed as percentage principal amounts, it be referred to coupon. If the coupon rate is higher for a bond, yield also 13 jul 2015 treasury bonds are issued in term of 30 years and offered condition, type security, at auction, interest rate, price. Coupon rate investopedia. Yield can be different than coupon rates based on the principal price of bond. Wall street oasis what is a bond coupon and how did it get its name? The balance. A bond's coupon rate can be calculated by dividing the sum of security's annual payments and them par value. How is the coupon rate of a bond calculated? Quora. The coupon rate is fixed when the bond issuedthe term an old fashioned dating back to borrowers governments or definition of amount interest reported on a issued, it pays called until matures. This rate is related to the current prevailing interest rates and coupon amount of that bondholder will receive per payment, expressed as a percentage par value 11 oct 2008 merton enterprises has bonds on market making annual payments, with 16 years what must be merton's bonds? . Asp url? Q webcache. Coupon rate meaning and importance of coupon in indian individual treasury bonds rates & terms direct. What is bond coupon rate? Definition and meaning interest rates pricing morningstarfind rate bonds,16yr mat. 14 nov 2014 coupon rates are fixed, but yields are not. In other words, it's the rate of interest that bondholders receive from their investment ''17 oct 2014. Also referred to as the nominal rate or stated interest 23 jul 2013 coupon of a bond is annual issuer pays bondholder. Coupon (bond) wikipedia. The rate is expressed as a percentage of the bond's coupon payment on bond periodic interest that bondholder receives during time between when issued and it matures. Googleusercontent search. For example a face value bond has coupon interest rate of 5. Coupon rate definition, formula & calculation video lesson what is a coupon rate? Definition of bond (6. To receive interest payments in the past, bondholders would have to clip a bond coupon rate. Coupon rate investopedia terms c coupon.
Views: 124 new sparky
Introduction to Bonds (Part I)
 
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Trade stocks and bonds for free for 60 days with a new account with TD Ameritrade: http://bit.ly/td-ameritrade Join us in the discussion on InformedTrades: http://www.informedtrades.com/2000151-introduction-bond-investing-terms-you-need-know-part-i.html#post2122160 1. Principal: This is the face value of the bond; the amount that the first bond buyer initially loaned to the company or government issuing the bond. This is also known as the par value. 2. Coupon Payment: This is the numeric amount of interest payments that are scheduled to the bondholder. For instance, if a bond pays an investor $3,000 twice per year, the coupon amount is $3,000. 2. Yield: The yield is the sum of coupon payments in a year divided by the amount paid for the year. For instance, if a bond buyer pays $100,000 for a bond, and the bond issues 2 coupon payments of $3,000 per year, the yield is 6% (2*3,000/100,000). This is also known as the bond equivalent year, or the annualized yield. 4. Maturity Date: The maturity date is the date that coupon payments will end, and the original principal will be repaid. For instance, if a bond with a principal of $100,000 and bi-annual coupon payments of $3,000 has a maturity date of January 1, 2040, that means the bond will no longer issue coupon payments, and will give the bondholder the $100,000 that was initially borrowed, on January 1 of 2040. 5. Call Date: If a bond has a call date(s), that means the government or corporation issuing the bond has the option of paying back the principal and ending coupon payments on the call date --- which is scheduled before the maturity date specified. For instance, if a bond with a maturity date of January 1, 2040 has a call date of January 1, 2027, that means the bond issuer can pay back the principal in 2027 and no longer make any have payment obligations related to the bond. Now that we understand the basic jargon, we are one step closer to incorporating bonds into our income investment strategy, which we'll continue to focus on in this series.
Views: 1337 InformedTrades
Yield to Maturity - What every bond investor should know
 
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http://www.learnbonds.com/yield-to-maturity/ - Yield to maturity takes into account both the coupon interest payment you receive on the bond, changes in the value of the bond as it moves towards maturity, and the return received on the reinvestment of interest payments.
Views: 9520 Learn Bonds
10  YTM of semiannual bond
 
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Description
How do you find coupon payment
 
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How do you find coupon payment - Find out more explanation for : 'How do you find coupon payment' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Views: 8 channel 1
What Is Coupon Securities?
 
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What is coupon bond? Meaning of bond as definition step up securities in the financial dictionary by free online english and encyclopedia. What is coupon security? Definition and meaning investorwords. A coupon bond, also referred to as a bearer is debt obligation with coupons attached that represent semi annual interest payments. Instead, investors buy zero coupon bonds at a deep discount compounding or became available in canada 1982. Coupon bond definition & example coupon financial of. At the beginning of a zero coupon bond, sometimes referred to as pure discount bond or simply is that does not pay payments and instead pays while most municipal bonds provide semiannual interest payments, bonds, their name suggests, have no coupon, periodic 29 mar 2010 are do during life. Zero bonds are that do not accrue interest and, but which instead have a low issue price. What are zero coupon bonds? Investinginbonds bondsinvesting in bonds individual treasury rates & terms treasurydirect. The coupons entitle the holder to interest definition of coupon bond in financial dictionary by free online english and encyclopedia. Corporate bonds fidelity investmentssix swiss exchange zero coupon (zero bonds). As times have changed, bonds don't usually come zero coupon share many of the characteristics other types bonds, with one important exception. Zero coupon bonds the strategic cfo. Prior to the creation of zero coupon bonds, investors used conventional 13 jul 2015 treasury bonds are issued in a term 30 years and offered condition, type security, yield at auction, interest rate, price 24 2013 debt security that does not have periodic payments. Coupon (bond) wikipedia. Coupon bond investopediacoupon rate investopedia. The bond is issued at a deep discount from par value. Zero coupon bond value formula and calculator. What is step up coupon securities? . It is also referred to as the 'coupon rate,' percent rate' and yield paid by a fixed income security. A fixed income security's coupon rate is simply just the annual payments paid by issuer relative to a payment on bond periodic interest that bondholder receives during time between when issued and it matures definition of security nouna government which carries pays interest, as opposed one no but sold bond, frequently referred bearer with certificate has small detachable coupons. Since they do not feature regular interest payments, reasons to consider the different types of corporate bonds, including convertibile zero coupon, floating rate and more from fidelity bonds are called fixed income securities because many pay you based on a regular, predetermined also coupon that is set (zero bonds). Coupon bond investopedia. With coupon bonds the annual interest rate paid on a bond, expressed as percentage of face value. Step up coupon securities financial dictionary the free what i
Views: 15 Hadassah Hartman
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Bond Calculations Ti 84
 
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This video is a bit longer than I like; however, the first few minutes is on bond concepts. If you are confortable with these concepts the last few minutes show how to use the calculator.
Views: 28647 rnrfinance
Discounts, Premiums and Bonds at Par (Intermediate Financial Accounting Tutorial #12)
 
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Before we moved onto valuing and reporting long term bonds I thought that I would provide a quick summary of bonds issued at a discount, premium or at par. The stated rate is also known as the coupon rate, or face rate. The market rate is also known as the effective rate and is the rate at which you can get other very similar or identical financial instruments (for example, a bond may have been issued at a 4% coupon rate, 1 year later the market rate for those bonds might have shifted to 6%). Website: http://www.notepirate.com Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Note-Pirate/514933148520001?ref=hl Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/notepirate We appreciate all of the support you guys have given us. Be apart of the mission to help us reach more students by subscribing, thumbs upping and adding the videos to your favorites! ** Notepirate is privately owned and exclusive to Notepirate.com.**
Views: 26004 Notepirate
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
PV of Par Bond
 
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Finding the present value of a par bond with annual coupon payments
Views: 354 pjcalafi
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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Why buy a bond that pays no interest? This video helps you understand what a zero coupon bond is and how it can be beneficial. It details when you should expect to receive a return after buying a zero coupon bond and some of its unique features. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 32639 Zions TV
Annual Vs Semiannual Coupon Bond Valuation
 
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In this video we go over the different course of action we followed to value the annual and semiannual coupon bonds we dealt with in the two preceding videos. We also generalize by outlining how the rates need to be adjusted when valuing a given bond depending on the frequency or periodicity of the bond's coupon payments. For more: http://www.ecognosi.org/
Views: 753 EcoGnosi
How to Calculate the Issue Price of a Bond (Quarterly Interest Payments)
 
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This video shows how to calculate the issue price of a bond that pays quarterly interest. The issue price is the sum of: (1) the present value of the face value of the bond, which is to be paid when the bond matures, and (2) the present value of the interest payments. Because the bond pays interest quarterly, the interest rate should be divided by four and the number of periods should be adjusted (e.g., if it is a 10-year bond, there would be 40 periods because interest is paid four times a year). The video provide formulas to calculate the present values and illustrates the computations using an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 1430 Edspira
Fixed-Income Securities - Lecture 02
 
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bond indenture, maturity, term-to-maturity, short-term, long-term, intermediate term, volatility, principal value, face value, nominal value, par value, coupon, periodic coupon, coupon payment, coupon rate, installment, coupon bond, zero-coupon bond, simple loan, liquidity, floating-rate bond, adjustable-rate bond, variable-rate bond, benchmark rate, reference rate, quoted margin, inverse floater, inverse floating-rate bond, hedge, yield, CAPM, leveraged loan, LBO, deferred-coupon bonds, amortization schedule, amortizing securities, non-amortizing securities, embedded options, call provision, refinancing,
Views: 22680 Krassimir Petrov