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Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1758365 CrashCourse
Why Do Atoms Bond?
 
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SciShow explains what makes atoms bond (and what makes them sometimes seem promiscuous). Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources:
Views: 388353 SciShow
How atoms bond - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-atoms-bond-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Atoms can (and do) bond constantly; it's how they form molecules. Sometimes, in an atomic tug-of-war, one atom pulls electrons from another, forming an ionic bond. Atoms can also play nicely and share electrons in a covalent bond. From simple oxygen to complex human chromosome 13, George Zaidan and Charles Morton break down the humble chemical bond. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Bevan Lynch.
Views: 411436 TED-Ed
Elements, Atoms, Molecules, Ions, Ionic and Molecular Compounds, Cations vs Anions, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains the difference between elements, atoms, molecules, and ions. It also explains how to distinguish ionic and molecular compounds also known as covalent compounds. Atoms are electrically neutral and contain equal number of protons and electrons. Ions have a net charge and contain a different number of protons and electrons. Positively charged ions are known as cations and negatively charged ions are known as anions. Atoms and Ions have the same number of neutrons. A molecule is particle consisting of multiple atoms. Pure elements are substances composed of one type of atom where as a compound is made up of different types of atoms. Ionic compounds consist of metals and nonmetals and contain ions with charges. Covalent compounds or molecular compounds usually consist of nonmetals.
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1416296 It's AumSum Time
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2321069 Khan Academy
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
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Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 137958 AtomicSchool
How Do Atoms Bond | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about how atoms bond when learning about the structure of atoms. Bonds form by the attraction of negatively charged electrons and the positive nucleus of atoms. Atoms have a positively charged tiny nucleus which contains almost all the atom’s mass, surrounded by shells of negatively charged electrons. Each shell is able to hold only up to a fixed number of electrons when it is said to be full. Hydrogen has a single positive charge in the nucleus and a single electron. If two hydrogen atoms approach each other, there is an attraction: the positive charge and the negative electron charge attract. However the first shell, for all atoms, can only contain two electrons so once the two Hydrogen atoms come together the two electrons essentially ‘fill’ the outer shell of both Hydrogen atoms. The atoms are essentially ‘glued’ together by the attraction of the two electrons and the two nuclei. The same form of electron share bonding occurs between any non-metallic elements, with the outer shell quickly becoming full, limiting the number of bonds that form. When there are four electrons in the outer shell, such as with carbon and silicon there is room for four more electrons so 4 bonds form. In this case it is possible to build up a 3-D structure with the bonding going on forever. In this way we see that carbon and silicon, as elements, have atoms chemically bonded into a 3D lattice so they are both solids at room temperature and very difficult to melt and vaporise. They are giant covalent structures. Metallic bonding is the way all metals and alloys are bonded, and explains the typical properties of metals. Atoms can be added as much as you want and there will never be enough electrons to fill the outer shell. So in metallic bonding, the atoms form a closely packed lattice where the atoms are not bonded by fixed pairs of electrons, but rather by a ‘sea’ of electrons roaming these partially filled outer shells at will. When two different atoms approach each other, covalent bonds can form. The number of electrons that are shared depends upon how many electrons are missing from the outer shells of the atoms. Overall, in this video you will learn how two atoms which approach each other have the possibility to bond if there is space in their outer electron shells. Non-metallic elements will tend to form self contained small molecules giving rise to volatile solids, liquids and all gases. Carbon and silicon will give rise to giant structures. Metallic elements will bond together to form metallic structures with loose electrons. When metal bonds with a non-metal ionic compounds are formed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
What's the Difference between an Atom and a Molecule?
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Never be confused by this concept again! In this video, we talk about the difference between an atom and molecule, and discuss the nucleus, energy levels, protons and neutrons, compounds, covalent bonding, sharing electrons, and lego blocks.
Views: 259687 Tyler DeWitt
Atoms and Molecules - Class 9 Tutorial
 
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Atoms are the smallest particle into which an element can be divided. Atoms can join together to form molecules, which in turn form most of the objects around you. Atoms are composed of particles called protons, electrons and neutrons. Protons carry a positive electrical charge, electrons carry a negative electrical charge and neutrons carry no electrical charge at all. The protons and neutrons cluster together in the central part of the atom, called the nucleus, and the electrons 'orbit' the nucleus. A particular atom will have the same number of protons and electrons and most atoms have at least as many neutrons as protons.
Views: 898501 amritacreate
Atoms and Molecules (an animated lecture video)
 
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This animated lecture video provides a succinct, yet thorough explanation of atoms and molecules. Designed for collegiate level introductory science classes, topics include: the atom, periodic table, ionic, covalent and hydroden bonding, water and carbon. Support website for this lecture, including a corresponding website, lecture slides, an interactive study guide and lab can be found at: thebiologyprimer.com/intro-to-biochemistry Main website: thebiologyprimer.com Contact the producer: [email protected] Music by TheIllaDopest (soundcloud.com/theilladopest) Media Credits: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Qgb6WzG2RsY9f7_tQl8rdqnrIBdzePiqjuy41Fqr2uI/edit?usp=sharing
Views: 21729 thebiologyprimer
Basic Chemistry for Biology, Part 1: Atoms
 
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This video series, Basic Chemistry for Biology Students, teaches the basic chemistry that you’ll need to know in your biology course, whether that’s introductory high school level, AP Biology, or even a first year college biology course. The series covers 1. The structure of atoms (a nucleus with protons and neutrons; electrons orbiting outside in orbitals) 2. What biology students need to know about the Periodic Table. 3. The “Octet Rule” for understanding how electrons are organized into orbitals. 4. Ionic bonding (how atoms trade electrons to become charged ions, and the ionic bonds that result) 5. Covalent bonding (how atoms share electrons to form molecules) Key chemistry terms (element, compounds, molecules, etc). 6. Understanding chemical formulas (molecular formulas and structural formulas). Each video is tightly linked to tutorials at http://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/basic-chemistry-tutorials/
Views: 108658 sciencemusicvideos
Ionic vs. Molecular
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry How can you tell the difference between compounds that are ionic and molecular (also known as covalent)? It has to do with the elements that make them up: ionic compounds are made of metals and nonmetals, and molecular (or covalent) compounds are made of nonmetals. We'll learn how they bond differently: in covalent compounds, the atoms share electrons, and in ion compounds, atoms steal electrons and then opposite charges attract. Ionic and molecular (covalent) compounds also look different at the microscopic level: covalent and molecular compounds exist in molecules, while ionic compounds are organized in lattice structures.
Views: 724801 Tyler DeWitt
Polar and Nonpolar Molecules
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into polar and nonpolar molecules. Here are some other videos: How To Draw Lewis Structures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeY_sihSh8E Quantum Numbers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sE1IvKAijmo&t=1s Intro to Chemistry: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KfG8kH-r3Y Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKKztV_6epU
Ionic Bonding Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This video is an introduction to ionic bonding, which is one type of chemical bonding. Ionic bonds hold together metal and nonmetal atoms. In ionic bonding, electrons are transferred from a metal atom to a nonmetal atom, creating ions. These ions have opposite charge, so they stick together. Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC
Views: 1056456 Tyler DeWitt
Orbitals: Crash Course Chemistry #25
 
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In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses what Molecules actually look like and why, some quantum-mechanical three dimensional wave functions are explored, he touches on hybridization, and delves into sigma and pi bonds. -- Table of Contents Molecules: Clumpy Globs... 0:18 Quantum-Mechanical Three-Dimensional Wave Functions 3:06 S & P Orbital Hybridization 5:27 Sigma & Pi Bonds 7:32 Hybridized Orbitals 5:52 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1853730 CrashCourse
Chemical Bonding - Ionic vs. Covalent Bonds
 
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This two minute animation describes the Octet Rule and explains the difference between ionic and covalent bonds. Find more free tutorials, videos and readings for the science classroom at ricochetscience.com
Views: 262267 RicochetScience
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2439371 CrashCourse
Introduction to the atom | Chemistry of life | Biology | Khan Academy
 
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The atom, proton, neutron and electron Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/electron-shells-and-orbitals/v/orbitals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/elements-and-atoms/v/elements-and-atoms?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2354809 Khan Academy
Atoms Bonding Song
 
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Here is a song I created for my 6th grade science students. I hope you enjoy Oh, oh, oh, oh, oh, Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Stable atoms, electrons don't leave, outer shell complete Lose one, gain one if it's an unstable one , yes then Most atoms have many shells, hey When it's full begins a new one 2, 8, 18, 32, shell numbers Electron configuration How many electrons you want? Yeah, covalent, it's sharing The covalent bond Molecules formed, elements and compounds Sometimes the atoms share more electrons Share two with partners, a double bond Covalent bonds strong, attraction's not Molecules spread from heating break apart These substances boy, low melting point But giant molecules hold on real strong Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding... Ionic bond gained or lost one It's got power electrical charges Not equal positive charged protons Or negative charged electrons these "Ions" If it's positive, it's a cation Lost electrons yes, this atom is But this one has gained is negative Anion has more electrons than protons Ionic bonds are formed When cations and anions come together now Attracted to each other ionic compound Made of metal also non-metals These compounds not separate molecules See them gathered in ionic lattice High boiling points, high melting points Weak forces molecular lattices Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding... Metallic bonding, metallic bonding Types of bonding metallic elements Cling together, metallic lattice Gotta see the regular arrangement Metal cations with free electrons You know they're traveling by them Atoms clinging, they're clinging Free electrons allow them sticking Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding, yeah Oh sometimes atoms are bonding, yeah It gets the properties that it never, never, never, never had before, no no Atoms are bonding Sometimes atoms are bonding
Views: 114426 ParrMr
Lewis Structures, Introduction, Formal Charge, Molecular Geometry, Resonance, Polar or Nonpolar
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to draw lewis structures of molecules and the lewis dot diagram of polyatomic ions. It shows you how to calculate the formal charge, how to draw the resonance form of the lewis structure and how to determine the hybridization of the central atom. It also discusses molecular geometry / vsepr and the bond angles that are found in common molecules as well as if the molecule is polar or nonpolar. This video contains plenty of formulas, notes, examples, and practice problems that will help you on your next worksheet assignment or upcoming quiz. This video contains all the answers / solutions to the problems posted. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Here is a list of topics: 1. How to draw the Lewis structure of a molecule or compound 2. Valence Electrons of Common Elements - Boron, Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen and Fluorine 3. Number of Bonds Elements Prefer to Form 4. Lone Pairs, Bonding Electrons, and Nonbonding Electrons 5. Octet Rule - Expanded Octet vs Incomplete Octet 6. Lewis Dot Structure of Diatomic Molecules / Elements - F2, O2, N2, and H2 7. Lewis Dot Diagram - BH3 - Incomplete Octet 8. Molecular Geometry of BH3 - Trigonal Planar - Bond Angle 120 Degrees 9. Formal Charge Calculations - Equation / Formula 10. Formal Charge = Valence Electrons - (Bonds + Dots) 11. How to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar 12. Polar vs Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Electronegativity Difference 13. Lewis Structures of H2O, H3O+, and OH- With Formal Charge Calculation 14. Why is CO2 Nonpolar When CO is Polar 15. Lewis Structure For CO2 and CO 16. CO2 - Linear Molecular Geometry, 180 Bond Angle 17. Hybridization - s, sp, sp2, sp3, dsp3 or sp3d, d^2sp3 or sp3d2 18. Lewis Structure For CH4 - Tetrahedral Molecular Geometry - Bond Angle of 109.5 Plus Hybridization 19. Lewis Dot Structure For NH3 - Trigonal Pyramidal - Bond Angle of 107, Sp3 Hybridized. 20. Lewis Structure For H2S - Bent Molecular Geometry and Tetrahedral Electron Pair Geometry 21. Molecular Geometry vs Electron Pair Geometry 22. Lewis Structure For SF6 - Octahedral Molecular Geometry, 90 Bond Angle, Sp3d2 Hybridized, Nonpolar 23. Lewis Structure For PCl5 - Polar or Nonpolar? 24. Lewis Structure For SF4, I3-, XeF4, IF5 - Multiple of 8 technique 25. How To Determine The Number of Lone Pairs on the Central Element 26. Lewis Structure For SOF2, POCl3, SO2Cl2, XeOF2 - Multiple Elements in a molecule - How to determine which element goes in the middle 27. Lewis Dot Diagrams With Resonance - CO3 2-, NO2-, BF3, and NO3- Lewis Structure 28. Polyatomic Ions - Lewis Structure For SO4 2-, PO4 3-, ClO4-, ClO3-, ClO2-, and ClO- 29. Lewis Structures With Radicals - Odd Number of Electrons - NO2 and NO Lewis Structure 30. Lewis Structures - Organic Molecules - Organic Chemistry - Functional Groups 31. Lewis Structure For C2H6 Ethane, C2H4 Ethene, C2H2 Acetylene or Ethyne - Alkanes, Alkenes, and Alkynes 32. Lewis Structure For CH3OH - Methanol - Alcohol Functional Group 33. Lewis Structure For CH3CHO - Ethanal - Aldehyde / Carbonyl 34. Lewis Structure For CH3COOH - Ethanoic Acid or Acetic Acid Found In Vinegar - Carboxylic Acid Functional Group 35. CH3COCH3 Lewis Structure - Acetone or Propanone - Ketone 36. Lewis Structure For CH3OCH3 - Dimethyl Ether 37. Lewis Structure For CH3CO2CH3 - Ester 38. Lewis Structure For CH3CH2NH2 - Ethyl Amine 39. Lewis Structure For CH3CONH2 - Ethanamide - Amide Functional Group 40. Lewis Structure For CH3CN - Nitrile
Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures
 
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This is a Videoscribe tutorial on how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ketzbook Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. Please also see the second video in my Lewis diagram series: https://youtu.be/qwqXAlvNxsU For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed My goal is to make chemistry easier ;) http://ketzbook.com
Views: 960267 ketzbook
Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
VSEPR Theory: Introduction
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry This is an introduction to the basics of VSEPR Theory. VSEPR theory is a set of rules for how to look at a Lewis structure and determine the three dimensional (3D) shape of a molecule. The shapes have to do with the location of bonds and lone electrons pairs. In this video, we'll look at the following shapes: linear, trigonal planar, bent, tetrahedral, and trigonal bipyramidal
Views: 1697893 Tyler DeWitt
GR 12 Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Bonds (Science Video Tutorial)
 
01:31:00
Download the worksheet for this video: http://www.zerobio.com/central/atoms_2003.pdf
Views: 541 zerobio
Polar Molecules Tutorial: How to determine polarity in a molecule
 
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This video looks at how to determine polarity in a molecule by understanding how the bond polarities, molecule shape, and outside atoms influence polarity using bond polarity vector addition. This includes a flow chart that guides you through the various decisions needed to determine if a molecule is polar or not. Wikipedia 1/1/2018: In chemistry, polarity is a separation of electric charge leading to a molecule or its chemical groups having an electric dipole or multipole moment. Polar molecules must contain polar bonds due to a difference in electronegativity between the bonded atoms. A polar molecule with two or more polar bonds must have a geometry which is asymmetric in at least one direction, so that the bond dipoles do not cancel each other. While the molecules can be described as "polar covalent", "nonpolar covalent", or "ionic", this is often a relative term, with one molecule simply being more polar or more nonpolar than another. However, the following properties are typical of such molecules. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds between molecular orbitals of different atoms. A molecule may be polar either as a result of polar bonds due to differences in electronegativity as described above, or as a result of an asymmetric arrangement of nonpolar covalent bonds and non-bonding pairs of electrons known as a full molecular orbital. Polar molecules[edit] The water molecule is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, with respective electronegativities of 3.44 and 2.20. The dipoles from each of the two bonds (red arrows) add together to make the overall molecule polar. A polar molecule has a net dipole as a result of the opposing charges (i.e. having partial positive and partial negative charges) from polar bonds arranged asymmetrically. Water (H2O) is an example of a polar molecule since it has a slight positive charge on one side and a slight negative charge on the other. The dipoles do not cancel out resulting in a net dipole. Due to the polar nature of the water molecule itself, polar molecules are generally able to dissolve in water. Other examples include sugars (like sucrose), which have many polar oxygen–hydrogen (−OH) groups and are overall highly polar. If the bond dipole moments of the molecule do not cancel, the molecule is polar. For example, the water molecule (H2O) contains two polar O−H bonds in a bent (nonlinear) geometry. The bond dipole moments do not cancel, so that the molecule forms a molecular dipole with its negative pole at the oxygen and its positive pole midway between the two hydrogen atoms. In the figure each bond joins the central O atom with a negative charge (red) to an H atom with a positive charge (blue). The hydrogen fluoride, HF, molecule is polar by virtue of polar covalent bonds – in the covalent bond electrons are displaced toward the more electronegative fluorine atom. Ammonia, NH3, molecule the three N−H bonds have only a slight polarity (toward the more electronegative nitrogen atom). The molecule has two lone electrons in an orbital, that points towards the fourth apex of the approximate tetrahedron, (VSEPR). This orbital is not participating in covalent bonding; it is electron-rich, which results in a powerful dipole across the whole ammonia molecule. Resonance Lewis structures of the ozone molecule In ozone (O3) molecules, the two O−O bonds are nonpolar (there is no electronegativity difference between atoms of the same element). However, the distribution of other electrons is uneven – since the central atom has to share electrons with two other atoms, but each of the outer atoms has to share electrons with only one other atom, the central atom is more deprived of electrons than the others (the central atom has a formal charge of +1, while the outer atoms each have a formal charge of −​1⁄2). Since the molecule has a bent geometry, the result is a dipole across the whole ozone molecule. When comparing a polar and nonpolar molecule with similar molar masses, the polar molecule in general has a higher boiling point, because the dipole–dipole interaction between polar molecules results in stronger intermolecular attractions. One common form of polar interaction is the hydrogen bond, which is also known as the H-bond. For example, water forms H-bonds and has a molar mass M = 18 and a boiling point of +100 °C, compared to nonpolar methane with M = 16 and a boiling point of –161 °C. Nonpolar molecules[edit] A molecule may be nonpolar either when there is an equal sharing of electrons between the two atoms of a diatomic molecule or because of the symmetrical arrangement of polar bonds in a more complex molecule. Not every molecule with polar bonds is a polar molecule. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has two polar C=O bonds, but the geometry of CO2 is linear so that the two bond dipole moments cancel and there is no net molecular dipole moment; the molecule is nonpolar.
Views: 167204 Crash Chemistry Academy
How Do Atoms Bond - Part 2 | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn the basics about how atoms bond when learning about the structure of atoms. Bonds form by the attraction of negatively charged electrons and the positive nucleus of atoms. Atoms have a positively charged tiny nucleus which contains almost all the atom’s mass, surrounded by shells of negatively charged electrons. Each shell is able to hold only up to a fixed number of electrons when it is said to be full. Hydrogen has a single positive charge in the nucleus and a single electron. If two hydrogen atoms approach each other, there is an attraction: the positive charge and the negative electron charge attract. However the first shell, for all atoms, can only contain two electrons so once the two Hydrogen atoms come together the two electrons essentially ‘fill’ the outer shell of both Hydrogen atoms. The atoms are essentially ‘glued’ together by the attraction of the two electrons and the two nuclei. The same form of electron share bonding occurs between any non-metallic elements, with the outer shell quickly becoming full, limiting the number of bonds that form. When there are four electrons in the outer shell, such as with carbon and silicon there is room for four more electrons so 4 bonds form. In this case it is possible to build up a 3-D structure with the bonding going on forever. In this way we see that carbon and silicon, as elements, have atoms chemically bonded into a 3D lattice so they are both solids at room temperature and very difficult to melt and vaporise. They are giant covalent structures. Metallic bonding is the way all metals and alloys are bonded, and explains the typical properties of metals. Atoms can be added as much as you want and there will never be enough electrons to fill the outer shell. So in metallic bonding, the atoms form a closely packed lattice where the atoms are not bonded by fixed pairs of electrons, but rather by a ‘sea’ of electrons roaming these partially filled outer shells at will. When two different atoms approach each other, covalent bonds can form. The number of electrons that are shared depends upon how many electrons are missing from the outer shells of the atoms. Overall, in this video you will learn how two atoms which approach each other have the possibility to bond if there is space in their outer electron shells. Non-metallic elements will tend to form self contained small molecules giving rise to volatile solids, liquids and all gases. Carbon and silicon will give rise to giant structures. Metallic elements will bond together to form metallic structures with loose electrons. When metal bonds with a non-metal ionic compounds are formed. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Polar Bonds and Molecules
 
03:36
Learn about what makes polar bonds polar and how intermolecular forces like hydrogen bonding occur.
Views: 44753 Teacher's Pet
The Molecular Shape of You (Ed Sheeran Parody) | A Capella Science
 
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I'm in love with your bonding orbitals. Support A Capella Science: http://patreon.com/acapellascience Subscribe! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=acapellascience ---------------- NANA APP: iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/record-your-music-sing-nana/id540360389?mt=8 Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nanamusic.android&hl=en My nana account: http://nana-music.com/users/4398582/ Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/nana.Sing.your.Life/ Instagram: @nanamusic_official Website: https://nana-music.co.jp/en/ ---------------- A CAPELLA SCIENCE STUFF: Patreon: http://patreon.com/acapellascience Facebook: http://facebook.com/acapellascience Twitter: http://twitter.com/acapellascience Bohemian Gravity poster: https://store.dftba.com/products/bohemian-gravity-poster MP3: http://timblais.bandcamp.com Follow me @acapellascience on Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat! ---------------- LYRICS: A dot isn't the best way to try to sum up how electrons come and go They are the states of a matter field that follows and equation that Dirac wrote The Schrodinger part of the whole equation will just lead In sub-c when it expands Now get that Coulomb and add it in with a proton And watch them start to dance As hydrogen it's like "Oh proton I feel your tug Central potential dip down pulling on me But I'm not falling in deep No that would break uncertainty" "Say oh Electrons move too much Slow down your pace and put that orbit on me Come on now follow my lead Come come on now follow my lead Orbitals take the shape they do As stable states of the quantum rules And when a one approaches two They combine and they're bonding Thus hydrogen as a rule Is found in nature as H2 Energy configuring a molecule Diatomically bonding Low high low high low high low high Diatomically bonding (x3) Energy cofiguring a molecule When orbitals take the shape they do 1/2 spin'll give a lepton a twin One up one down in the ground state With S and P in quadruple degeneracy The second shell can be filled up with eight The higher angular powers spread out like beautiful flowers In middle families they come into play Well here's a carbon with 6e This ain't nothing tricksy But we're gonna make some methane today With hydrogen it's like "Oh atoms I feel your tug Got my electrons bugged out pulling on me Come on now settle round me I'll hybridize to sp3" "Say oh Carbon here's touch Spread out 109.47 degrees Come on now follow our lead Come come on now follow our lead" Molecules take the shape they do Combining states of the quantum rules Like when a shell goes sp2 For sigma pi double bonding And as widely as their purview They spread out in the molecule Look at benzene in a ring they hold it true Aromatically bonding Low high low high low high low high Aromatically bonding (x3) Look at benzene in a ring they hold it true When orbitals take the shape they do Come bond with me baby, come bond (x8) Polymers take the shape they do Combining base-level residues Like RNA's ACGU Look they're hydrogen bonding! Peptides make a chain and group In beta pleat sheets and corkscrews With these secondary links they fold and move They're all over your body Come bond with me baby, come bond (x6) You're a chemical machine It's best you knew That molecules take the shape of you. Copyright 2017 Tim Blais and A Capella Science Original music by Ed Sheeran
Views: 4862445 acapellascience
Chemicals - why and how do atoms bond together to make molecules?
 
04:30
Basic but fascinating stuff about how atoms bond together to make different kinds of molecules.
Sigma and Pi Bonds: Hybridization Explained!
 
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Sigma bonds are the FIRST bonds to be made between two atoms. They are made from hybridized orbitals. Pi bonds are the SECOND and THIRD bonds to be made. They are made from leftover "p" orbitals. Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 1330934 chemistNATE
Chemical Bonds: Covalent vs. Ionic
 
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Mr. Andersen shows you how to determine if a bond is nonpolar covalent, polar covalent, or ionc. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 626076 Bozeman Science
Polar Covalent Bonds and Nonpolar Covalent bonds, Ionic Bonding - Types of Chemical Bonds
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the types of chemical bonds such as polar covalent bonds, nonpolar covalent bonds and ionic bonds. It discusses the difference between ionic bonding and covalent bonding. Ionic bonds can be identified by looking for a metal combined with a nonmetal. Covalent bonds typically occur among 2 or more nonmetals. Covalent bonding involves a sharing of electrons and ionic bonding forms as a result of a transfer of electrons from the metal to the nonmetal producing ions with opposite charge which are attracted to each other. The electrostatic force of attraction produces the ionic bond that holds the cations and anions together. Polar covalent bonds have unequal sharing of electrons between the atoms where as nonpolar covalent bonding have a relatively equal sharing of electrons between the atoms attached to the bond. Polar covalent bonds typically have an electronegativity difference of 0.5 or more where as nonpolar covalent bonds have a value difference of 0.4 or less. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Covalent vs. Ionic bonds
 
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This quick video explains: 1) How to determine the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons that an atom will comtain. 2) The characteristics of covalent bonds 3) The characteristics of ionic bonds Teachers: You can purchase this PowerPoint from my online store for only $3. The link below will take you to the store. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Covalent-vs-Ionic-Bonds-PowerPoint-2340207 - Atom - Element - Proton - Neutron - Electron - Atomic number - Atomic mass - Covalent - Ionic - O2 - Salt - Sodium chloride
Views: 395344 Beverly Biology
Atoms, Molecules, Bonds
 
00:40
Views: 54 Ace Glenn
Ionic Bond | #aumsum
 
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Ionic bond is the transfer of electrons from a metallic atom to a non-metallic atom. Sodium Chloride: Oppositely charged sodium and chloride ions are held by a strong electrostatic force of attraction known as Ionic Bond.
Views: 1199915 It's AumSum Time
Basic Chemistry for Biology Part 4: Covalent Bonding and Structural Formulas
 
09:28
This video series, Basic Chemistry for Biology Students, teaches the basic chemistry that you’ll need to know in your biology course, whether that’s introductory high school level, AP Biology, or even a first year college biology course. The series covers 1. The structure of atoms (a nucleus with protons and neutrons; electrons orbiting outside in orbitals) 2. What biology students need to know about the Periodic Table. 3. The “Octet Rule” for understanding how electrons are organized into orbitals. 4. Ionic bonding (how atoms trade electrons to become charged ions, and the ionic bonds that result) 5. Covalent bonding (how atoms share electrons to form molecules) Key chemistry terms (element, compounds, molecules, etc). 6. Understanding chemical formulas (molecular formulas and structural formulas). Each video is tightly linked to tutorials at http://www.sciencemusicvideos.com/basic-chemistry-tutorials/
Views: 26993 sciencemusicvideos
How to Draw Lewis Structures: Five Easy Steps
 
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A video tutorial for how to draw Lewis Structures in five steps. The video covers the basic Lewis structures you'll see in an introductory chemistry class. Get more chemistry help at www.Breslyn.org. The five steps are: 1. Find the total valence electrons for the molecule. 2. Put the least electronegative atom in the center. Note: Hydrogen (H) always goes outside. 3. Put two electrons between atoms to form a chemical bond. 4. Complete octets on outside atoms. 5. If central atom does not have an octet, move electrons from outer atoms to form double or triple bonds. Lewis Structures are important to learn because they help us predict: - the shape of a molecule. - how the molecule might react with other molecules. - the physical properties of the molecule (like boiling point, surface tension, etc.). --- Drawing done in Adobe Illustrator and captured with Camtasia Studio on a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. Audio recording using a Yeti Blue microphone.
Views: 1874866 Wayne Breslyn
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
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Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1511366 CrashCourse
Atomic Bonds - Chemistry Basics Part II
 
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Atoms forming bonds - why they do it, how they do it and what happens when they do it. Ionic bonds, non-polar covalent bonds, polar covalent bonds and hydrogen bonds. Atoms getting happy, that's what it's all about. Want more? Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/user/ThePenguinProf FB Page: https://www.facebook.com/ThePenguinProf Twitter: https://twitter.com/penguinprof Web: http://www.penguinprof.com/
Views: 198365 ThePenguinProf
Lecture: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure - 1
 
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Lecture: Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure - 1
Views: 1880943 CBSE Udaan XI
Which Bond Is More Polar?
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains how to determine which bond is more polar. It also explains how to rank the bonds from least polar to most polar. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals, Sigma and Pi Bonds, Sp Sp2 Sp3, Organic Chemistry, Bonding
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial explains the hybridization of atomic orbitals. It discusses how to determine the number of sigma and pi bonds in a molecule as well determining if a carbon is sp, sp2, or sp3 hybridized. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Valence Bond Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UP4LhDhoUE Molecular Orbital Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P21OjJ9lDcs Orbitals, Atomic Energy Levels, & Sublevels Explained! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4sLXUr2HWIs How To Receive Tutoring and Get Paid At The Same Time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8A8JTpOWCQ Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeljbZhx9bY Excel For Beginners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK-uNYuvcag Here is a list of topics: 1. Atomic Orbitals - S, px, py, and pz orbitals 2. Hybrid Orbitals vs Unhybridized Orbitals 3. Sp, Sp2, and SP3 hybridized Orbitals 4. S character vs P Character 5. Bond Strength of Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 6. Bond Length of Triple Bonds and Single Bonds 7. Sigma Bonds vs Pi Bonds 8. More Examples on Structure and Bonding 9. Electron Configuration of Carbon and Valence Bond Theory 10. Electron Configuration of Hybrid Orbitals - sp sp2 and sp3 11. dsp3 and d2sp3 hybridization 12. Hybridization of Lone pairs - Localized vs Delocalized Electrons 13. Hybridization of Lone pairs in resonance structures 14. Sigma and Pi Bonds In Single, Double, and Triple Bonds 15. Sigma Bonds and Overlap of Atomic Orbitals 16. Mixing Atomic Orbitals to form Hybrid Orbitals 17. Unhybridized P orbitals and pi bonding 18. Structure of Ethane With Hybrid Orbitals 19 Ethene or Ethylene Hybridization and Atomic Orbitals 20. Molecular Orbital Theory 21. Structure & Bonding of Ethyne or Acetylene - sigma and pi bonds 22. valence bond theory
Molecules ,Atom and Molecules, Molecular Structures,Molecular Bonds.
 
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Molecules ,Atom and Molecules, Molecular Structures,Molecular Bonding. A molecule is an electrically neutral group of two or more atoms held together by chemical bonds. Molecules are distinguished from ions by their lack of electrical charge. However, in quantum physics, organic chemistry, and biochemistry, the term molecule is often used less strictly, also being applied to polyatomic ions. In the kinetic theory of gases, the term molecule is often used for any gaseous particle regardless of its composition. According to this definition, noble gas atoms are considered molecules as they are in fact monoatomic molecules. A molecule may be homonuclear, that is, it consists of atoms of one chemical element, as with oxygen (O2); or it may be heteronuclear, a chemical compound composed of more than one element, as with water (H2O). Atoms and complexes connected by non-covalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonds or ionic bonds, are generally not considered single molecules. Molecules as components of matter are common in organic substances (and therefore biochemistry). They also make up most of the oceans and atmosphere. However, the majority of familiar solid substances on Earth, including most of the minerals that make up the crust, mantle, and core of the Earth, contain many chemical bonds, but are not made of identifiable molecules. Also, no typical molecule can be defined for ionic crystals (salts) and covalent crystals (network solids), although these are often composed of repeating unit cells that extend either in a plane (such as in graphene) or three-dimensionally (such as in diamond, quartz, or sodium chloride). The theme of repeated unit-cellular-structure also holds for most condensed phases with metallic bonding, which means that solid metals are also not made of molecules. In glasses (solids that exist in a vitreous disordered state), atoms may also be held together by chemical bonds with no presence of any definable molecule, nor any of the regularity of repeating units that characterizes crystals.
Views: 118 Amrita Academy
Polar and Non Polar Covalent Molecules, Polar vs. Nonpolar - CLEAR & SIMPLE
 
14:18
CLEAR & SIMPLE - What is the difference between polar and nonpolar molecules? Check out this video on Molecular Polarity which makes this EASY. Polar and Non Polar Covalent Molecules - This video explains how to determine if a molecule is polar or non polar. I show you how, based on symmetry alone, a molecule can be determined to polar or non polar. Although I show you the shapes of the molecules, it is important for you to be able to classify the shapes according to the VSEPR Theory, so please learn your shapes. The degree of polarity can be determine to a certain extent by the differences in electronegativity, but I don't cover that in this video. Best wishes in learning.
Views: 201175 sciencepost
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Biochemistry 1 - atoms, ions, bonds
 
26:38
I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
Views: 861 mrdaubney

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