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What is RENAISSANCE ART? What does RENAISSANCE ART mean? RENAISSANCE ART meaning & explanation
 
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What is RENAISSANCE ART? What does RENAISSANCE ART mean? RENAISSANCE ART meaning - RENAISSANCE ART definition - RENAISSANCE ART explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Renaissance art is the painting, sculpture and decorative arts of that period of European history known as the Renaissance, emerging as a distinct style in Italy in about 1400, in parallel with developments which occurred in philosophy, literature, music and science. Renaissance art, perceived as a royalty of ancient traditions, took as its foundation the art of Classical antiquity, but transformed that tradition by the absorption of recent developments in the art of Northern Europe and by application of contemporary scientific knowledge. Renaissance art, with Renaissance Humanist philosophy, spread throughout Europe, affecting both artists and their patrons with the development of new techniques and new artistic sensibilities. Renaissance art marks the transition of Europe from the medieval period to the Early Modern age. In many parts of Europe, Early Renaissance art was created in parallel with Late Medieval art. The influences upon the development of Renaissance men and women in the early 15th century are those that also affected Philosophy, Literature, Architecture, Theology, Science, Government and other aspects of society. The following list presents a summary, dealt with more fully in the main articles that are cited above. Classical texts, lost to European scholars for centuries, became available. These included Philosophy, Prose, Poetry, Drama, Science, a thesis on the Arts and Early Christian Theology. Simultaneously, Europe gained access to advanced mathematics which had its provenance in the works of Islamic scholars. The advent of movable type printing in the 15th century meant that ideas could be disseminated easily, and an increasing number of books were written for a broad public. The establishment of the Medici Bank and the subsequent trade it generated brought unprecedented wealth to a single Italian city, Florence. Cosimo de' Medici set a new standard for patronage of the arts, not associated with the church or monarchy. Humanist philosophy meant that man's relationship with humanity, the universe and with God was no longer the exclusive province of the Church. A revived interest in the Classics brought about the first archaeological study of Roman remains by the architect Brunelleschi and sculptor Donatello. The revival of a style of architecture based on classical precedents inspired a corresponding classicism in painting and sculpture, which manifested itself as early as the 1420s in the paintings of Masaccio and Uccello. The improvement of oil paint and developments in oil-painting technique by Dutch artists such as Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden and Hugo van der Goes led to its adoption in Italy from about 1475 and had ultimately lasting effects on painting practices, worldwide. The serendipitous presence within the region of Florence in the early 15th century of certain individuals of artistic genius, most notably Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Piero della Francesca, Donatello and Michelozzo formed an ethos out of which sprang the great masters of the High Renaissance, as well as supporting and encouraging many lesser artists to achieve work of extraordinary quality. A similar heritage of artistic achievement occurred in Venice through the talented Bellini family, their influential inlaw Mantegna, Giorgione, Titian and Tintoretto. The publication of two treatises by Leone Battista Alberti, De Pitura (On Painting), 1435, and De re aedificatoria (Ten Books on Architecture), 1452.
Views: 1816 The Audiopedia
Fascinating and Interesting Characteristics of Renaissance Art
 
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Art works of the Renaissance period are exemplary of the creative genius that existed in that era. These works have had numerous interpretations over the centuries, but some characteristics remain synonymous with the period, don't they? In this video, we undertake a quick study of these traits, and see how they affected the art of the time. To know more about the art of the Renaissance era you can visit http://www.buzzle.com/articles/renaissance-art-characteristics.html
Views: 384 Buzzle
Warburg Symposium Day 1- Classical & Renaissance Art
 
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This two-day symposium explores Warburg's ideas and their adumbrations, e.g., his preoccupations with - and intuitions about - memory, both in relation to different forms of artistic creation and in anticipation of concepts related to neuroplasticity and neuroesthetics; the significance and fluency of the image - its elliptical and metaphoric functions - and of affect for the phenomena and qualia of chronology and memory, in concert with contemporary understanding of the dynamic unconscious; and the interdisciplinary mode of thought - the philosophical and art historical, cosmographic and historical - at the heart of Warburg's atlas. Schedule for Saturday, October 12th: 4:15 pm: Classical & Renaissance Art roundtable: Georges Didi-Huberman, Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, François Quiviger, Dorothea Rockburne, and  Christopher Wood Georges Didi-Huberman, philosopher and art historian, teaches at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales) in Paris, where he has been a lecturer since 1990. He is a winner of the Distinguished Lifetime Achievement Award for Writing on Art given by the College Art Association. Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann is Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University. He received degrees from Yale, the Warburg Institute, and Harvard, and has been awarded honorary doctorates by the Technical University, Dresden, and the Masaryk University, Brno. The holder of the Palacký medal from the Czech Academy of Sciences, he is a member of the Swedish, Flemish, and Polish Academies of Science, and has been a Fellow of the American Academies in Berlin and Rome, among other honors and Fellowships. He is the author or editor of many books and articles on historiography, geography of art, art and science, Central European art and architecture 1450-1800, and global exchange in art.He is now writing about global exchange in art and world art history. François Quiviger took his Ph.D. from the Warburg Institute, London, where he works as  curator of digital resources, librarian, and researcher. He has written, taught, and curated projects on early modern European academies, on mythology and on Renaissance material culture, art and art theory.His recent book, The Sensory World of Italian Renaissance Art (London, Chicago 2010), explores the presence and function of sensation in Renaissance ideas and practices, investigating their link to mental imagery and how Renaissance artists made touch, sound, and scent palpable to the minds of their audience. Dorothea Rockburne was born in Montreal. She was educated at the Montreal Museum School and at Black Mountain College, where she studied with, among other contemporaries, Philip Guston and Franz Kline, as well as the German mathematician Max Dehn, whose teachings, merging the mathematical and natural worlds, provided her with new and complex approaches to her work. Her interests in the Golden Mean, astronomy, cosmology, and lifelong fascination with Egyptians' use of proportion and light, additionally shaped her oeuvre.Working with both industrial and natural materials, she paints, cuts, draws, folds and calculates to create complex works of art built upon mathematical foundations. Christopher Wood (A.B., Harvard 1983, Ph.D., Harvard 1991) has been teaching at Yale since 1992. He is currently Visiting Professor in the German Department, New York University, and has taught as a visitor at the University of California (Berkeley), Vassar College, and the Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
Views: 4834 helixcenter
An Easy Peasy History Of Renaissance!
 
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It's always Easy Peasy to Subscribe: http://bit.do/eNVx3 An Easy Peasy History of the Renaissance Oh, the Renaissance. A time of discovery, of art, of invention, and growth. Sure, it was back in the day when there were plagues and disease and less than stellar medical care, but the art! The Science! The Music and Religion! It really was a time of splendor, right? Yeah, kind of! Music by Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: http://facebook.com/enjoy.science/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1626 Easy Peasy
Great Minds: Leonardo da Vinci
 
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Leonardo da Vinci was one of the most diversely talented individuals of all time. His "unquenchable curiosity" led him to make discoveries and inventions that were beyond his time, not to mention his numerous artistic masterpieces. Today on SciShow, Hank takes us into the mind of this Renaissance Man and explores some of his many contributions to the world. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.livescience.com/39355-leonardo-da-vinci.html http://www.livescience.com/11329-leonardo-da-vinci-10-ideas.html http://www.leonardo-da-vinci.ch/science http://legacy.mos.org/leonardo/scientist.html http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2012/may/01/leonardo-da-vinci-artist-or-scientist http://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/codex/ http://www.geniusstuff.com//blog/list/10-leonardo-da-vinci-inventions/ http://www.ivu.org/history/davinci/hurwitz.html http://www.nytimes.com/books/00/11/26/reviews/001126.26papinet.html http://www.ecoliteracy.org/essays/learning-leonardo http://www.livescience.com/20157-anatomy-drawings-leonardo-da-vinci.html http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4289204.stm http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/exhibitions/leonardo-da-vinci-anatomist/exhibition-curator-martin-clayton-explores-some-of-leonardos http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2117809/ http://universalleonardo.org/work.php?id=514 http://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/codex/ http://wrightstories.com/da-vincis-aerodynamics/
Views: 1164316 SciShow
8 HIDDEN SECRETS In Famous Paintings You Never Noticed
 
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Subscribe! Because SMART IS THE NEW SEXY: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L Do you think only people can keep secrets? Not so fast! Paintings and other works of art can do that too. Many of these messages are often political, moral, or based on religious allegories and artists couldn’t find another way to express them and not being punished. Sometimes artists used their imagination and hid playful images, jokes and even riddles in their paintings. Some of them have already been found by the keen eye of the specialists, others, however, remain hidden. Smart is the New Sexy presents 10 hidden secrets you never noticed about famous paintings: 0:57 - Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Supper 02:19 - Michelangelo, The Separation of Light from Darkness, the Sistine Chapel 3:16 - Vincent Van Gogh, Cafe Terrace At Night 4:11 - Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Netherlandish Proverbs 5:07 - Caravaggio, Bacchus 06:04 - Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa 07:03 - Hans Holbein, The Ambassadors 08:07- Tivadar Csontvary Kosztka, The Old Fisherman ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: http://facebook.com/enjoy.science/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 2999376 SMART BANANA
HSC Visual Arts  - The Renaissance
 
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In this HSC Visual Arts video, we take you through the Renaissance movement starting with its origins then moving on to its characteristics and finishing with some of the big names of the movement. To watch more videos, head to our website: https://getatomi.com/au Subscribe to our channel for more FREE videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5h2Z7YEQsyGPwp6dB6arIg Like us on Facebook for handy study tips and blog articles on how to smash your HSC: https://www.facebook.com/Hschub/ Follow Atomi on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/get.atomi/?hl=en Follow Atomi news on Twitter: https://twitter.com/atomihq
Views: 312 Atomi
8 Dark Secrets Of Mona Lisa You Will Never Stop Speaking About
 
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Be like SMART BANANA: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L Hey, everyone. Today we will make a sort of cultural journey. Ready? Let’s go. A figure on the scene is Leonardo da Vinci. I’m sure you all know who he was, Though… In the Renaissance which brought together all human activities, art meant science, art meant truth to life: Leonardo da Vinci was a great figure. He embodied the epic endeavor of Italian art to conquer universal values. He combined within himself the fluctuating sensitivity of the artist and the deep wisdom of the scientist, the poet, and the master. In his Mona Lisa, the individual, a sort of miraculous creation of nature, represents at the same time the species: the portrait goes beyond its social limitations and acquires a universal meaning. And although centuries have passed we still continue to reveal secrets of that piece of art. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: http://facebook.com/enjoy.science/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 1746837 SMART BANANA
Italian Renaissance painting
 
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Video Software we use: https://amzn.to/2KpdCQF Ad-free videos. You can support us by purchasing something through our Amazon-Url, thanks :) Italian Renaissance painting is the painting of the period beginning in the late 13th century and flourishing from the early 15th to late 16th centuries, occurring in the Italian peninsula, which was at that time divided into many political areas.The painters of Renaissance Italy, although often attached to particular courts and with loyalties to particular towns, nonetheless wandered the length and breadth of Italy, often occupying a diplomatic status and disseminating artistic and philosophical ideas.The city of Florence in Tuscany is renowned as the birthplace of the Renaissance, and in particular of Renaissance painting.A detailed background is given in the companion articles Renaissance and Renaissance architecture. This channel is dedicated to make Wikipedia, one of the biggest knowledge databases in the world available to people with limited vision. Article available under a Creative Commons license Image source in video
Views: 123 WikiWikiup
Renaissance Woman: Venus on a Clam
 
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A naked goddess gives us an alternate surfboard and an artist gives us wind. Renaissance Woman (Ep1): Botticelli's 'Venus' Written and Presented by Hannah Gadsby Directed by John Kassab Filmed by Josh Waddell Title Music by Ben Bennett Produced and Edited by John Kassab & Hannah Gadsby (c) Pudding Pictures 2015 Special Thanks: Suz Dayton, Leila Waid, Dane Cody, The Happy Apple, Odette Kassab and Kay Gadsby. Paintings: Birth of Venus, Sandro Botticelli, c.1485 The Mutilation of Uranus by Saturn, Giorgio Vasari Music: Musopen.org
Views: 184737 Hannah Gadsby
Master Painting Composition by Rubens - Part I [Art Techniques] (2014)
 
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Links in the description. Thank you for your support! If you've ever wondered how the master painters composed their paintings...how they breathe life into their work...how they captivate their viewers and keep them coming back, then this series is for you! I go through each design technique, step by step. Describing how Rubens achieved such an amazing masterpiece. The key is learning design and composition in order to grab ahold of your viewers attention and keep them enchanted while they enjoy your art. This is a three part series and you can find written analyzed paintings of over 100 master paintings as well as a couple sculptures. Blog Entry Part 1 - https://goo.gl/hwMY8X Blog Entry Part 2 - https://goo.gl/f9He3o Blog Entry Part 3 - https://goo.gl/amYnsN EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO REACH THE MASTER LEVEL! Products made by me, to help YOU surpass your plateau :) MEMBERSHIP (500+ ARTICLES): https://goo.gl/ssLhnD COMPOSITION BOOK ART & PHOTOGRAPHY: https://goo.gl/YZ4Z6q COMPOSITION BOOK STREET PHOTOGRAPHY: https://goo.gl/Gmz81s 7 COMPOSITION VIDEOS: https://goo.gl/Ax1CGi DYNAMIC SYMMETRY GRIDS: https://goo.gl/fuPEHy DYNAMIC SYMMETRY BOOK: https://goo.gl/n3LuTB Music by Seven d' Six (me) Find the music on iTunes: https://goo.gl/GwgGP9 FOLLOW on FACEBOOK: https://goo.gl/RL36Sc Instagram: @canonofdesign Just a few of the topics covered: artistic composition, composition, design, set design, photography, painting, geometry, armature, grid, root rectangles, phi ratio, diagonals, reciprocals, gestalt psychology, figure to ground relationship, greatest area of contrast, simultaneous contrast, edge flicker, repetition, gamut, peter paul rubens Photoshop, Action, The Master Pass
Views: 35721 Tavis Leaf Glover
Cursed Medieval Cat Paintings
 
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kwite: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheCentralCarnage wildspartanz (brandon): https://www.youtube.com/user/wildspartanz we look at cursed cat medieval paintings - twitter // https://twitter.com/kinganiii discord // https://discord.gg/keswek5 instagram // https://instagram.com/kinganiii twitch // https://www.twitch.tv/kinganii snapchat // kinganiii business inquires // [email protected] icon art // https://twitter.com/alohasushicore music // dci noot - clockwise https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZklJgyaQ_UQ
Views: 447004 kingani
A History of Women in Art | Wikimedia UK
 
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Women artists have been subject to many historical disadvantages and are much less well known than male artists. This video explores the history of women in art and encourages women to become Wikipedia editors to reduce the gender gap in biographical articles on the website. This video is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ Website: https://www.wikimedia.org.uk Blog: https://blog.wikimedia.org.uk/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/wikimediauk Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WikimediaUK
Views: 1854 Wikimedia UK
Fascinating Stories Behind Popular Art
 
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Top 10 interesting backstories of well known paintings. Subscribe to our channel: http://goo.gl/9CwQhg Other Videos You Might Like Amazing Stories Behind Iconic Photos https://youtu.be/hBJBRVV_F5E 10 Creepiest Pages On Wikipedia https://youtu.be/CVo4WRaLaL4 Description: When it comes to art, it can speak to people in many different ways. Because the human mind is not universal, we do not interpret art in the same way. What most people don’t realize is that some of the most iconic paintings to have been created have the most fascinating stories behind them. Sometimes the stories are more interesting than the paintings themselves. Each color choice and brush stroke represent a narrative in the paintings birth story, and eventually become a masterpiece that impact people generations to come long after the artist has passed away. Art has the ability to invoke emotions and awaken our senses. From looking at a painting of a forest, we are taken back to our own experiences among the trees. We might be able to smell the wood, feel the breeze blowing by, and visually see the animals and plant life around us. Because of this kind of reaction, artists have a powerful tool in sending messages and making us feel certain things from looking at their work. There is no question that art is one of the most powerful devices for inspiration and manipulation. In this video, you will see paintings from a variety of different time periods and artists. From Vincent van Gogh to Andy Warhol, the artists here each had unique experiences that motivated them to pick up the paint brush. Whether they were trying to recreate a life experience, like what Edvard Munch did in his painting “The Scream” or what van Gogh created with “Starry Night” as he recreated his window view from his room at a mental hospital, or they were trying to send a message like Grant Wood with “American Gothic” or Salvador Dali with “The Persistence of Memory”. Some of the most famous paintings today have assumed stories and origins, such as Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” where people assume the female subject can’t be identified. While she remains a mystery, by looking at historical records, art historians believe that they are closer than ever to finding out the truth about the woman behind the smile. Learning about the stories behind these popular paintings can be both fun and educational. If you look at the origin story of “The Raft of Medusa”, many people are shocked to find out that the painting is based on actual events that include shipwrecks, cannibalism, descents into madness, and death. The painting is the second most popular painting at the Louvre Museum (after the Mona Lisa), and was able to draw a crowd on its own without the historical information. Situations such as these speak volumes about our history and the evolution of mankind. As we grow and develop the world of art, we are finding that we have more in common with the people of the past than ever before. For more information on the fascinating stories behind the world’s most popular paintings, check out the video below. Don’t worry, you didn’t need to take a class in art history in order to appreciate these works of art. Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheRichest.org Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheRichest_Com Instagram: http://instagram.com/therichest Featuring: The Creation of Adam The Raft of the Medusa American Gothic Campbell’s Soup Cans Mona Lisa Whistler’s Mother The Persistence of Memory Guernica Starry Night The Scream Music Track: Emergency For more videos and articles visit: http://www.therichest.com/
Views: 767981 TheRichest
Renaissance | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Renaissance Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Renaissance (UK: , US: ) is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature. Early examples were the development of perspective in oil painting and the recycled knowledge of how to make concrete. Although the invention of metal movable type sped the dissemination of ideas from the later 15th century, the changes of the Renaissance were not uniformly experienced across Europe: the very first traces appear in Italy as early as the late 13th century, in particular with the writings of Dante and the paintings of Giotto. As a cultural movement, the Renaissance encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch; the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting; and gradual but widespread educational reform. In politics, the Renaissance contributed to the development of the customs and conventions of diplomacy, and in science to an increased reliance on observation and inductive reasoning. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual pursuits, as well as social and political upheaval, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man".The Renaissance began in Florence, Italy, in the 14th century. Various theories have been proposed to account for its origins and characteristics, focusing on a variety of factors including the social and civic peculiarities of Florence at the time: its political structure; the patronage of its dominant family, the Medici; and the migration of Greek scholars and texts to Italy following the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. Other major centres were northern Italian city-states such as Venice, Genoa, Milan, Bologna, and finally Rome during the Renaissance Papacy. The Renaissance has a long and complex historiography, and, in line with general scepticism of discrete periodizations, there has been much debate among historians reacting to the 19th-century glorification of the "Renaissance" and individual culture heroes as "Renaissance men", questioning the usefulness of Renaissance as a term and as a historical delineation. The art historian Erwin Panofsky observed of this resistance to the concept of "Renaissance": It is perhaps no accident that the factuality of the Italian Renaissance has been most vigorously questioned by those who are not obliged to take a professional interest in the aesthetic aspects of civilization—historians of economic and social developments, political and religious situations, and, most particularly, natural science—but only exceptionally by students of literature and hardly ever by historians of Art. Some observers have called into question whether the Renaissance was a cultural "advance" from the Middle Ages, instead seeing it as a period of pessimism and nostalgia for classical antiquity, while social and economic historians, especially of the longue durée, have instead focused on the continuity between the two eras, which are linked, as Panofsky observed, "by a thousand ties".The word Renaissance, literally meaning "Rebirth" in French, first appeared in English in th ...
Views: 59 wikipedia tts
What Was The Renaissance?
 
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When they looked at learn about three important reasons why the renaissance is in history and for today twenty first century oct 12, 2016 a period from 14th to 17th century, considered bridge between middle ages modern. The renaissance began after the plague in 14th and 15th centuries was fueled by soldiers returning from crusades jan 9, 2015 answer kaiser kuo, dabbler history a cultural intellectual movement that peaked during 16th of course, topic historical discussion long before debate as to whether built upon continued christian mid fourteenth century marked beginning transition between medieval modern worlds. Make research projects and school reports about renaissance easy with credible jun 29, 2016 the was a period of 'rebirth' in arts, science european society. Why is the renaissance important? Italianrenaissance. Definition, meaning, & facts. When they looked at learn about three important reasons why the renaissance is in history and for today twenty first century start studying what was. Britannica jul 19, 2017 renaissance, ( french rebirth ) period in european civilization immediately following the middle ages and conventionally held to have been characterized by a surge of interest classical scholarship values term 'renaissance' is derived from word meaning 'rebirth'. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, other study tools developed in the middle ages for exploration continued to be used during renaissance. Renaissance period facts, information & worksheets. One of these was the astrolabe, a portable device used by renaissance art and literature. It was a time of transition from the ancient world to detailed history european renaissance including its art, archetecture, scultures and writers kids learn about. What was the renaissance flashcards exploration and trade annenberg learnerthe reformation. Lesson what was the renaissance? Quora. Definition, meaning, & facts introduction what was the renaissance? , renaissance in europe wikipedia. Educational articles for teachers, students, and schools including renaissance art, philosophy, the was a period in which people started looking to classical world (ancient greece rome) with much admiration. History renaissance for kids ducksters. It is used to describe this phase of european history because many the changes experienced between 14th and 16th centuries were inspired by a revival classical art intellect ancient greece rome renaissance was period in history, from 17th century, regarded as cultural bridge middle ages modern find out more about art, including videos, interesting articles, pictures, historical features. Renaissance art facts & summary history encyclopedia articles the renaissance 'rebirth' of science culture live. Get all the facts on get information, facts, and pictures about renaissance at encyclopedia. History of the renaissance in europe a rebirth, renewal, rediscovery. Medieval times) and the renaissance? Cliffs notes. It started as renaissance
Views: 49 Bun Bun 1
The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini
 
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Hear two outstanding scholars consider the art of biography and poetics of portraiture in fifteenth-century Italy. Presented with the exhibition The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini. Learn more: http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2011/the-renaissance-portrait-from-donatello-to-bellini Lectures Portraits in Words: The Arts of Biography in Fifteenth-Century Italy Anthony Grafton, Henry Putnam University Professor of History, Princeton University Leonardo's Ginevra de' Benci and the Poetics of Portraiture in Fifteenth-Century Florence Caroline Elam, senior research fellow, The Warburg Institute, University of London This event is made possible in part by the Italian Cultural Institute. The exhibition is made possible by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, and The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation. The exhibition was organized by Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Gemäldegalerie and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. It is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. The exhibition catalogue is made possible by the Samuel I. Newhouse Foundation, Inc.
Views: 50869 The Met
The Evolution of the The Adoration of the 3 Magi in Art History - Symbolism, Culture, and Race
 
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For more information about the negative symbolism in the Adoration of the 3 Magi paintings, have a look at the articles below: https://www.jstor.org/stable/1483476?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents https://www.jstor.org/stable/1483528?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
Views: 239 April Dill
Renaissance | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Renaissance 00:04:08 1 Overview 00:07:41 2 Origins 00:09:25 2.1 Latin and Greek phases of Renaissance humanism 00:12:26 2.2 Social and political structures in Italy 00:15:19 2.3 Black Plague 00:18:11 2.4 Cultural conditions in Florence 00:19:45 3 Characteristics 00:19:54 3.1 Humanism 00:23:01 3.2 Humanism and Libraries 00:24:14 3.3 Art 00:27:56 3.4 Science 00:30:57 3.5 Navigation and Geography 00:32:42 3.6 Music 00:33:28 3.7 Religion 00:36:05 3.8 Self-awareness 00:38:02 4 Spread 00:38:37 4.1 England 00:39:09 4.2 France 00:40:40 4.3 Germany 00:41:50 4.4 Hungary 00:44:53 4.5 Netherlands 00:45:31 4.6 Northern Europe 00:47:37 4.7 Poland 00:49:05 4.8 Portugal 00:51:49 4.9 Russia 00:56:32 4.10 Spain 00:58:09 4.11 Further countries 00:58:22 5 Historiography 00:58:31 5.1 Conception 01:01:33 5.2 Debates about progress 01:04:43 6 Other Renaissances Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Renaissance (UK: , US: ) is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries and marking the transition from the middle ages to modernity. Some historians focus more on the medieval aspects of the Renaissance and argue that it was an extension of the medieval period; others focus more on its modern aspects and argue that it was a break with the past.The intellectual basis of the Renaissance was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature. Early examples were the development of perspective in oil painting and the recycled knowledge of how to make concrete. Although the invention of metal movable type sped the dissemination of ideas from the later 15th century, the changes of the Renaissance were not uniformly experienced across Europe: the very first traces appear in Italy as early as the late 13th century, in particular with the writings of Dante and the paintings of Giotto. As a cultural movement, the Renaissance encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch; the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting; and gradual but widespread educational reform. In politics, the Renaissance contributed to the development of the customs and conventions of diplomacy, and in science to an increased reliance on observation and inductive reasoning. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual pursuits, as well as social and political upheaval, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man".The Renaissance began in Florence, Italy, in the 14th century. Various theories have been proposed to account for its origins and characteristics, focusing on a variety of factors including the social and civic peculiarities of Florence at the time: its political structure; the patronage of its dominant family, the Medici; and the migration of Greek scholars and texts to Italy following the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. Other major centres were northern Italian city-states such as Venice, Genoa, Milan, Bologna, and finally Rome during the Renaissance Papacy. The Renaissance has a long and complex historiography, and, in line with general scepticism of discrete periodizations, there has been much debate among historians reacting to the 19th-century glorification of the "Renaissance" and individual culture heroes as "Renaissance men", questioning the usefulness of Renaissance as a term and as a historical delineation. The art historian Erwin Panofsky observed of this resistance to the concept of "Renaissance": It is p ...
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
8 Mysteries of Famous Paintings That Will Give You Goosebumps
 
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Be like SMART BANANA: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 8 Mysteries of Famous Painting That Will Give You Goosebumps Painting: Lady with the Unicorn Artist: Raphael X-rays of the painting show that the unicorn was originally a dog. In fact, Raphael likely painted the woman without anything in her hands at all — the dog and unicorn were likely added by other artists. In those days, the dog was considered a symbol of fidelity, and her appearance in the picture indicated the imminent marriage. The unicorn personifies purity. Art critics agree that the young Raphael wrote this picture under the impression of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” that he saw. The artist painted a girl in the same perspective as the great master and used the same techniques. As it turned out, the picture had several additions. In the XVII century, the girl drew a cloak, chastely covering her shoulders, and in place of the unicorn. Music by Epidemic Sound: https://www.epidemicsound.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: http://facebook.com/enjoy.science/ The Bright Side of Youtube: https://goo.gl/rQTJZz 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 388000 SMART BANANA
The Greatest Artist Of All Time 'Michelangelo' (Seminar)
 
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Professor Wallace’s biography has been called “the most important re-assessment of Michelangelo in more than one hundred years. Not since Irving Stone’s novel The Agony and the Ecstasy has there been such a compelling and human portrayal of this remarkable yet credible human individual.” An internationally recognized expert on Michelangelo, Wallace will speak about the challenges and excitement of writing a modern biography of the famous Renaissance artist. He will present a substantially new view of the extraordinary man, who was not only a great sculptor, painter, architect, engineer, and poet but also an aristocrat who believed in the ancient and noble origins of his family. Utilizing the words of Michelangelo and his contemporaries, the lecture will place the famous artist firmly in his times, among his workers, family, friends, popes and patrons. William E. Wallace received his Ph.D. in Art History from Columbia University in New York in 1983 and is currently Professor in the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Washington University in St. Louis. He teaches Renaissance art and architecture, and is an internationally recognized authority on Michelangelo and his contemporaries. In 1990-91 he was a fellow at Harvard University’s Center for Renaissance Studies in Florence; in 1996-97 he was at the American Academy in Rome; and in 1999 he was Distinguished Visiting Professor at Williams College. In addition to more than eighty essays, chapters and articles (as well as two works of fiction), he is the author and editor of six different books on Michelangelo, including Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man, and his Times (2010), which has been widely hailed as the foremost recent study of the artist. He served as the principal consultant for The Divine Michelangelo, a two-part film produced by the BBC.
Views: 1622 Mehmet Zeyneloglu
Christus Lecture: "The Sistine Chapel: History and Meaning"
 
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Christus Lecture: "The Sistine Chapel" History and Meaning" Presented by Dr. Charles Rosenberg, Ph.D. An internationally recognized authority on Italian Renaissance and Baroque art, Dr. Rosenberg is professor emeritus of art history at the University of Notre Dame. He has held numerous national fellowships, including the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence and the American Academy in Rome. In addition to several dozen articles and reviews, Rosenberg has published a book on art and politics in Renaissance Ferrara. He is the editor of a book on art and patronage in six northern Italian Renaissance cities and has just completed a catalog of Notre Dame’s collection of Rembrandt’s religious prints.
Views: 2455 Spring Hill College
Italian Renaissance vs. Northern Renaissance (AP European History)
 
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http://www.tomrichey.net/writing-clinic This is a brief tutorial video designed to show AP Euro students how to construct an argument comparing the Italian Renaissance and the Northern Renaissance. The Italian Renaissance is typically characterized as secular and individualistic, while the Northern Renaissance is seen as more Christian and socially-oriented. As all historical claims must be supported by evidence, I use Machiavelli's The Prince and Thomas More's Utopia to contrast the two Renaissance movements. And don't forget to note what they have in common! Although the Italian Humanists and Northern Humanists differed in their approach and philosophy, they were all inspired by humanistic (classical) studies. With this approach, you should be set up to score at least half the points on your AP Euro LEQ (Long Essay Question) if not more! For more writing tutorials, consider signing up for my 8 Month Writing Clinic: http://www.tomrichey.net/writing-clinic MUSIC CREDIT: Angevin B Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Views: 53293 Tom Richey
Who Started The Renaissance?
 
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Basic ideas of the renaissance italianrenaissance. How did the renaissance start? Renaissance humanism history guide. Renaissance (1300s 1600s) scholastic. The renaissance start? Duckstersso how did the begin? Why causes of a guide thoughtco. The italian the european renaissance began in northern italy 14th century approach here is that about 1350 and rest of europe after 1450 it lasted until 1620. The renaissance was a cultural movement that began in italy the 14th period which people started looking to many artists and architects, who may have been influenced by humanism or were hired early 1400's new art literature. Many historians assert that it started the historical period known as renaissance spans from about 15th to anatomy was also important in italy due many artists who worked there learn more introduction boundless open textbook. But then it became clear that giotto had been the forerunner of renaissance painting. The renaissance start? Duckstersso how did the begin? Why The causes of a guide thoughtco. Encyclopedia articles the renaissance in europe a rebirth, renewal, rediscovery. It started roughly in the 14th century and 23 feb 2017 this discussion of causes renaissance looks at seven key factors while there were classical texts western europe start taking advantage new hunger for old texts, or by scholars who had find out more about history art, including videos, write high as culmination all italian a process that began 19 jul humanism achieved fruition first italy. Introduction what was the renaissance? , renaissance in europe facts, information, pictures. Renaissance art facts & summary history definition, meaning, of the renaissance historyworld. Humanism, secularism and individualism in the renaissance famous people of 'rebirth' science & culture live. It started as a cultural movement in italy the late medieval period and later renaissance was that profoundly affected european 17 oct 2011 john bensalhia recalls era of high looks at work it's began florence 13th century 10 may 2010 but spread throughout europe. St john's college, cambridge. Boccaccio is just one of the many followers petrarch who visit ancient during middle ages, italy was not unified country that it today. Introduction to the renaissance boundless. It was in art that the spirit of renaissance achieved its sharpest formulation. The renaissance start? Ducksters the is generally considered to have started in florence, italy around middle ages people thought that life was supposed be hard a period european history, from 14th 17th century, regarded as cultural bridge between and modern history. Art came history of the renaissance including word renaissance, petrarch but there is one field in which a new start consciously made 14th century. It was a historical began, the civilization of greece and rome had long been exerting partial students literature, philosophy, theology see in renaissance that began when italian scholars, scientists artists created period h
Views: 30 Bun Bun 1
Pieter Aertsen : A collection of 51 Paintings (HD) [Northern Renaissance]
 
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Pieter Aertsen : A collection of 51 Paintings (HD) [Northern Renaissance] #Pieter_Aertsen - Born: 1508; Amsterdam, Netherlands - Died: 03 June 1575; Amsterdam, Netherlands - Nationality: Dutch - Art Movement: #Northern_Renaissance - Genre: genre painting, still life - Field: painting Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pieter_Aertsen _______ Pieter Aertsen (Amsterdam, 1508 – 3 June 1575), called Lange Pier ("Tall Pete") because of his height, was a Dutch painter in the style of Northern Mannerism. He is credited with the invention of the monumental genre scene, which combines still life and genre painting and often also includes a biblical scene in the background. He was active in his native city Amsterdam but also worked for a long period in Antwerp, then the centre of artistic life in the Netherlands. His genre scenes were influential on later Flemish Baroque painting, Dutch still life painting and also in Italy. His peasant scenes preceded by a few years the much better-known paintings produced in Antwerp by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. He was apprenticed with Allaert Claesz. He then travelled to the Southern Netherlands and took up residence in Antwerp, first with his compatriot Jan Mandijn. Aertsen became a member of Antwerp's Guild of Saint Luke. In the official books of the Guild he is recorded as "Langhe Peter, schilder" (Tall Peter, painter). In 1542 he became a citizen (poorter) of Antwerp. He also got married to Kathelijne Beuckelaar, the daughter and sister of an Antwerp painter and aunt of Joachim Beuckelaer and Huybrecht Beuckeleer. Of the couple's eight children, three sons, Pieter, Aert, and Dirk became successful painters. Aertsen returned to Amsterdam in 1555-56. Notable pupils who trained in his workshop included Stradanus and Aertsen's nephews, Joachim Beuckelaer and Huybrecht Beuckeleer. Joachim Beuckelaer continued and further developed Aertsen's style and subject matter of painting. After beginning by painting religious works, in the 1550s he developed the painting of domestic scenes in which he reproduced articles of furniture, cooking utensils, and food with great flair and realism. His Butcher's Shop, with the Flight into Egypt (Uppsala, 1551) "has been called the earliest example of Mannerist inversion of still life in Northern painting", showing the "lower" subject matter far more prominently than the subject from history painting. A similar inversion in landscape painting had been developed by Joachim Patinir in Antwerp several decades earlier when he invented the world landscape. Unlike these, in Aertsen's works the genre material dominates the front of the image, with the history scene, normally religious, easy to overlook in the background. This pictorial technique drew on the paintings of another Antwerp artist, Jan Sanders van Hemessen, whose genre treatments of religious and moral scenes had smaller scenes inset into the background in a similar way. ___________ Check out My work here ------------------ #BAROQUE [Post Renaissance Art] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_TFGVWRL6nG5V3C9j3h5xnp #Northern_Renaissance [RENAISSANCE ART] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?index=1&playnext=1&list=PLOZVqusZxS_RHzh0LcGOpJ30L9CxZAHmf #Mannerism (Late Renaissance) [RENAISSANCE ART] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_R-6z6EiRJoHlqBNULhPdZQ #HIGH_RENAISSANCE [Renaissance Art]: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_TAW8yBAWDSpPeV-B4EUnUe #EARLY_RENAISSANCE [RENAISSANCE ARTS] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_Rl5u1xeWi3_hNWVbd99rp8 #PROTO_RENAISSANCE [Renaissance Art] : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_R6P61q7DOnuZgGGsqw-tN3 #Medieval_Art : https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_T7YNe7cv7fLpg6Hej3NiSh THE HIGHLIGHT: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOZVqusZxS_RMuvIyAIEplral4SxUwJt8 Updating ... _____ SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIuWeUnkfqn_yKlo_RAaoDA Google+: https://plus.google.com/116866857388773060412 Twitter: https://twitter.com/_NineTv Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NineTv.8102/ Contact: [email protected] Thank you for your support! :| 9Tv |: No Arts No Life © Copyright by 9Tv
Views: 49 9 Tv
Life of Christ in art | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Life of Christ in art Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Life of Christ as a narrative cycle in Christian art comprises a number of different subjects narrating the events from the life of Jesus on earth. They are distinguished from the many other subjects in art showing the eternal life of Christ, such as Christ in Majesty, and also many types of portrait or devotional subjects without a narrative element. They are often grouped in series or cycles of works in a variety of media, from book illustrations to large cycles of wall paintings, and most of the subjects forming the narrative cycles have also been the subjects of individual works, though with greatly varying frequency. By around 1000, the choice of scenes for the remainder of the Middle Ages became largely settled in the Western and Eastern churches, and was mainly based on the major feasts celebrated in the church calendars. The most common subjects were grouped around the birth and childhood of Jesus, and the Passion of Christ, leading to his Crucifixion and Resurrection. Many cycles covered only one of these groups, and others combined the Life of the Virgin with that of Jesus. Subjects showing the life of Jesus during his active life as a teacher, before the days of the Passion, were relatively few in medieval art, for a number of reasons. From the Renaissance, and in Protestant art, the number of subjects increased considerably, but cycles in painting became rarer, though they remained common in prints and especially book illustrations.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
10 Interesting Facts About Masaccio
 
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SOURCES: 1. http://www.encyclopedia.com/people/literature-and-arts/european-art-1599-biographies/masaccio 2. https://theculturetrip.com/europe/italy/articles/10-painters-of-the-italian-renaissance-you-should-know/ 3. http://biography.yourdictionary.com/masaccio 4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=be4N7d16S4I
Views: 611 Andre Nelson
Renaissance | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:05:23
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Renaissance 00:04:07 1 Overview 00:07:40 2 Origins 00:09:24 2.1 Latin and Greek phases of Renaissance humanism 00:12:25 2.2 Social and political structures in Italy 00:15:18 2.3 Black Plague 00:18:10 2.4 Cultural conditions in Florence 00:19:43 3 Characteristics 00:19:53 3.1 Humanism 00:23:00 3.2 Humanism and Libraries 00:24:13 3.3 Art 00:27:54 3.4 Science 00:30:55 3.5 Navigation and Geography 00:32:39 3.6 Music 00:33:25 3.7 Religion 00:36:01 3.8 Self-awareness 00:37:58 4 Spread 00:38:33 4.1 England 00:39:05 4.2 France 00:40:36 4.3 Germany 00:41:46 4.4 Hungary 00:44:47 4.5 Netherlands 00:45:26 4.6 Northern Europe 00:47:31 4.7 Poland 00:48:59 4.8 Portugal 00:51:42 4.9 Russia 00:56:26 4.10 Spain 00:58:02 4.11 Further countries 00:58:15 5 Historiography 00:58:24 5.1 Conception 01:01:25 5.2 Debates about progress 01:04:34 6 Other Renaissances Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Renaissance (UK: , US: ) is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries and marking the transition from the middle ages to modernity. Some historians focus more on the medieval aspects of the Renaissance and argue that it was an extension of the medieval period; others focus more on its modern aspects and argue that it was a break with the past.The intellectual basis of the Renaissance was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature. Early examples were the development of perspective in oil painting and the recycled knowledge of how to make concrete. Although the invention of metal movable type sped the dissemination of ideas from the later 15th century, the changes of the Renaissance were not uniformly experienced across Europe: the very first traces appear in Italy as early as the late 13th century, in particular with the writings of Dante and the paintings of Giotto. As a cultural movement, the Renaissance encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch; the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting; and gradual but widespread educational reform. In politics, the Renaissance contributed to the development of the customs and conventions of diplomacy, and in science to an increased reliance on observation and inductive reasoning. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual pursuits, as well as social and political upheaval, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man".The Renaissance began in Florence, Italy, in the 14th century. Various theories have been proposed to account for its origins and characteristics, focusing on a variety of factors including the social and civic peculiarities of Florence at the time: its political structure; the patronage of its dominant family, the Medici; and the migration of Greek scholars and texts to Italy following the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. Other major centres were northern Italian city-states such as Venice, Genoa, Milan, Bologna, and finally Rome during the Renaissance Papacy. The Renaissance has a long and complex historiography, and, in line with general scepticism of discrete periodizations, there has been much debate among historians reacting to the 19th-century glorification of the "Renaissance" and individual culture heroes as "Renaissance men", questioning the usefulness of Renaissance as a term and as a historical delineation. The art historian Erwin Panofsky observed of this resistance to the concept of "Renaissance": It is p ...
Views: 38 wikipedia tts
Mona Lisa - Why so Famous?
 
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The Mona Lisa is widely considered the greatest portrait of all time. It appears in countless advertisements, has inspired poetry, sculpture, forgeries, and theft. But seriously, why? The painting is small, only 30 x 21 inches, the color is somber, the background seems desolate and eerie, and the subject isn't anyone historically significant. So, what is all the brouhaha about? Is it really all about her mystifying gaze and a quirkly smile? Well, let's take a closer look. ********************** To check out the latest curiously awesome products from Vat19.com, click here: http://www.vat19.com/dvds/showproducts.cfm?action=new&adid=youtube For the most popular items on Vat19, click here: http://www.vat19.com/dvds/showproducts.cfm?action=popular&adid=youtube
Views: 3213386 Vat19
Isabelle Frank - Is the Term Ornament Still Relevant Today?
 
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Lecture date: 2008-11-13 Isabelle Frank questions the relevance of the term ornament for contemporary practice. Initially a subdivision of classical rhetoric, ornament was adopted by Renaissance theorists as a way to describe attributes of art and architecture. Ornament thrived for several centuries until its very success led to its banishment from modernist architectural theory and practice. It has survived, even if not named or recognised in its current forms, while our understanding of it has not progressed beyond the modernist, polarized debates. Frank argues that it is time to liberate architectural theory from an aesthetic term that hampers our ability to analyse and understand current architectural practice. Isabelle Frank is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at The New School in New York. Previously she has been at the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, at the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Northwestern University. She is the author of articles on Italian Renaissance art and theory of decorative arts and has published The Theory of Decorative Arts: An Anthology of European and American Writings 17501940 (Yale, 2000) and Die Rhetorik des Ornaments (Fink Verlag, 2001). 'Ornament' Lecture Series co-ordinated by Oliver Domeisen.
Renaissance | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:05:32
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance 00:04:08 1 Overview 00:07:41 2 Origins 00:09:25 2.1 Latin and Greek phases of Renaissance humanism 00:12:26 2.2 Social and political structures in Italy 00:15:19 2.3 Black Plague 00:18:11 2.4 Cultural conditions in Florence 00:19:45 3 Characteristics 00:19:54 3.1 Humanism 00:23:01 3.2 Humanism and Libraries 00:24:14 3.3 Art 00:27:56 3.4 Science 00:30:57 3.5 Navigation and Geography 00:32:42 3.6 Music 00:33:28 3.7 Religion 00:36:05 3.8 Self-awareness 00:38:02 4 Spread 00:38:37 4.1 England 00:39:09 4.2 France 00:40:40 4.3 Germany 00:41:50 4.4 Hungary 00:44:53 4.5 Netherlands 00:45:31 4.6 Northern Europe 00:47:37 4.7 Poland 00:49:05 4.8 Portugal 00:51:49 4.9 Russia 00:56:32 4.10 Spain 00:58:09 4.11 Further countries 00:58:22 5 Historiography 00:58:31 5.1 Conception 01:01:33 5.2 Debates about progress 01:04:43 6 Other Renaissances Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Renaissance (UK: , US: ) is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries and marking the transition from the middle ages to modernity. Some historians focus more on the medieval aspects of the Renaissance and argue that it was an extension of the medieval period; others focus more on its modern aspects and argue that it was a break with the past.The intellectual basis of the Renaissance was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature. Early examples were the development of perspective in oil painting and the recycled knowledge of how to make concrete. Although the invention of metal movable type sped the dissemination of ideas from the later 15th century, the changes of the Renaissance were not uniformly experienced across Europe: the very first traces appear in Italy as early as the late 13th century, in particular with the writings of Dante and the paintings of Giotto. As a cultural movement, the Renaissance encompassed innovative flowering of Latin and vernacular literatures, beginning with the 14th-century resurgence of learning based on classical sources, which contemporaries credited to Petrarch; the development of linear perspective and other techniques of rendering a more natural reality in painting; and gradual but widespread educational reform. In politics, the Renaissance contributed to the development of the customs and conventions of diplomacy, and in science to an increased reliance on observation and inductive reasoning. Although the Renaissance saw revolutions in many intellectual pursuits, as well as social and political upheaval, it is perhaps best known for its artistic developments and the contributions of such polymaths as Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, who inspired the term "Renaissance man".The Renaissance began in Florence, Italy, in the 14th century. Various theories have been proposed to account for its origins and characteristics, focusing on a variety of factors including the social and civic peculiarities of Florence at the time: its political structure; the patronage of its dominant family, the Medici; and the migration of Greek scholars and texts to Italy following the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks. Other major centres were northern Italian city-states such as Venice, Genoa, Milan, Bologna, and finally Rome during the Renaissance Papacy. The Renaissance has a long and complex historiography, and, in line with general scepticism of discrete periodizations, there has been much debate among historians reacting to the 19th-century glorification of the "Renaissance" and individual culture heroes as "Renaissance men", questioning the usefulness of Renaissance as a term and as ...
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
Inventions of the Renaissance Era That Wiped Out the Dark Ages
 
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Considered to be the cultural bridge between the middle ages and the modern times, the Renaissance period saw a lot of inventions that are the basis of most of today's technology. From gunpowder to wallpapers, this period saw discoveries that have shaped the world to be what it is today. The path-breaking inventions and discoveries of the Renaissance era changed the face of history, and pulled Europe out of the Dark Ages. This video will focus on such inventions, along with the designs of Leonardo Da Vinci. For more about the Renaissance inventions and their history, see: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/renaissance-inventions.html
Views: 1804 Buzzle
THE HERMITAGE. The Art of Western Europe. Italy, Part 2
 
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You can find in this movie the history of development of the Italian school of art, see and listen details about the most known masterpieces of Italian arts known over the world and are the source of The Hermitage pride. Part 2 of this movie introduce you the Highest Renaissance period and post-Renaissance Italian arts.
Views: 359 Vpra2277
Stephen Greenblatt: Can Art Be Universal?
 
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Stephen Greenblatt argues that art is always grounded in its time and place, but that powerful art contains universal elements. Stephen Jay Greenblatt (born November 7, 1943) is a literary critic, theorist and scholar. Greenblatt is regarded by many as one of the founders of New Historicism, a set of critical practices that he often refers to as "cultural poetics"; his works have been influential since the early 1980s when he introduced the term. Greenblatt has written and edited numerous books and articles relevant to new historicism, the study of culture, Renaissance studies and Shakespeare studies and is considered to be an expert in these fields. His most popular work is Will in the World, a biography of Shakespeare that was on the New York Times Best Seller list for nine weeks. He has been an editor of the Norton Anthology of English Literature and the Norton Anthology of Shakespeare. He is also co-founder of the literary-cultural journal Representations, which often publishes articles by new historicists. Greenblatt is the Cogan Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler and Elizabeth Rodd http://bigthink.com/ Transcript-- Stephen Greenblatt: I think that the idea of reading from a universal point of view is a fantasy. You read from your own point of view, from a particular place and time, from who you are and what your interests are. Maybe we will when we become cyborgs of some kind or other and cease to have any fleshly existence. But as far as I know now, even in our current situation, we read from the particular people we are and with the particular interests we have. So whatever we mean by universality in art, Shakespearian or otherwise, I think doesn't have to do with a lift-off that lets you escape everything, the time and place it was produced and the time and place you are produced. That said, the key question is how is it possible for a work that was written in a particular circumstance with a particular set of interests, nonetheless to speak to other people across a huge gap in time. I remember as a freshman in college reading Chaucer, who wrote in the 14th century, and thinking, "Really? They had irony back then?" I'd be amazed that I could hear this voice, this laughing, ironic voice that sounded like it was my contemporary, though I also understood that it wasn't my contemporary, it was written from the 14th century. One feels that in Homer, one feels that in Shakespeare, one feels that in lots of texts that come from very far away. If you take, what would be an example, A poem by Thomas Wyatt, writing in the time of Henry VIII. Wyatt was probably the lover of Ann Boleyn. He finds himself in kind of erotic agony because his mistress has been taken from him. And he sits down to write a poem. "They flee from me that some time did me seek with naked foot stalking in my chamber I have seen them gentle, tame and meek that now are wild and do not remember that sometimes they put themselves in danger to take bread of my hand. And now they range busily seeking with the continual change. But once in special in thin array after a pleasant guise, when her loose gown from her shoulders did fall, and she me caught in her arms long and small, therewith all sweetly did we kiss and softly said, 'Dear heart, how like you this?'" The poem goes on. But we'll stop for a moment there. We have a very particular memory, one so special, one special time, "in thin array after a pleasant guise," an erotic memory that he's had was really about something in his life, from the early 16th century. It's a very special context, this context of the Henrician court, of Ann Boleyn, of Thomas Wyatt. If the poem works as it does for me, it works because it's somehow is making connection to me across this huge gap of time and class and culture and identity. I can't explain fully why. I mean, I can try to account psychoanalytically for why it might have some connection, though I'm not inclined to do it at the moment. But it has to do with the language; it has to do with the kind of incantatory magic of words. It has to do with what happens to the air as it passes through your lungs, as you recite the verses. It's some connection to love and disappointment and it crosses barriers. And that's what is the fascination of works of art. But it doesn't mean that it's universal. It doesn't mean that it escapes from time and place. It means that it's able to be mobile. And mobility rather than universality is really for me the key issue.
Views: 24192 Big Think
The Silent Theology of Islamic Art
 
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On December 17, 2017, Oludamini Ogunnaike gave a talk at Zaytuna College about how the art of Islamic Civilizations reflected the metaphysics and theology of Islam. "[The creative masterpieces of of Islamic civilization] communicate the beauty and truth of its revelation with a profound directness simply unmatched by articles or books about Islam. One of the many curious aspects of contemporary times provides proof: despite the dissemination of virulent propaganda against Islam in the West, many people from Western societies queue for hours to admire the architecture of the Alhambra in Spain and the Taj Mahal in India as well as exhibitions of Islamic calligraphy and miniature paintings, and to attend sold-out concerts of traditional Islamic music. This is due to another paradox: these most tangible and outward manifestations of the Islamic tradition represent its most subtle, inward, and essential realities. Hence, it seems it is better to show than to tell." Read the article: https://renovatio.zaytuna.edu/article/the-silent-theology-of-islamic-art
25 Magnificent Museums You Have To Visit In Your Lifetime
 
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When visiting some of the world´s metropolis, do not forget to check out the their beautiful museums. Exhibits of artistic, cultural, historical or scientific collections can be the highlights of your vacation. While there have been many posts and articles about the various collections found in museums, this post will focus on the museum buildings themselves. For the treasures housed inside, we may tend to overlook the beauty of these monumental architectural jewels. Have you been to any of these 25 amazing and beautiful museums? If you haven’t, you’re missing out. They are beautiful museums, why wouldn’t anyone want to go? https://twitter.com/list25 https://www.facebook.com/list25 http://list25.com Check out the written list - http://list25.com/25-magnificent-museums-you-have-to-visit-in-your-lifetime/ Here’s a preview: 25 Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum – New York City, New York, USA Located on Fifth Avenue in the Upper East Side neighborhood of Manhattan, this museum is the permanent home of a renowned and continuously expanding collection of Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, early Modern and contemporary art. In 2013, almost 1.2 million people visited the museum, which makes it one of the most popular exhibition sites in New York City. 24 Museum of Natural History – Vienna, Austria With over 30 million objects, this Austrian museum is one of the largest in Europe. It also serves as a working place for about 60 staff scientists. Their main fields of research covers a wide range of topics from the origins of our Solar system to the evolution of animals. 23 Vatican Museums – Vatican City, Rome, Italy Vatican Museums display works from the immense collection built up by the Roman Catholic Church throughout the centuries including some of the most renowned classical sculptures and most important masterpieces of Renaissance art in the world. In 2013, they were visited by 5.5 million people, which makes it the 5th most visited art museum in the world. 22 National Museum of Natural Science – Taichung, Taiwan Founded in 1986, the museum is divided into six parts housing the Space IMAX Theater, Science Center, Life Science Hall, Human Cultures Hall, Global Environment Hall, and Botanical Garden. With over 3 million visitors annually, it is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Taiwan. 21 Acropolis Museum – Athens, Greece Founded in 2003 on the ruins of a part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens, this museum focuses on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. Set only 300 yards away from the famous temple of Parthenon, its exhibit hosts nearly 4,000 objects. 20 National Folk Museum of Korea – Seoul, South Korea Established in 1945 by the U.S. Government, the museum in Seoul features replicas of historical objects to illustrate the history of traditional life of the Korean people. It has three main exhibition halls, with almost 100,000 artifacts. 19 Guggenheim Museum – Bilbao, Spain Designed by Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry, this museum of modern art is one of the most admired works of contemporary architecture. It notably houses large-scale, site-specific works and installations by contemporary artists. 18 Hermitage Museum – Saint Petersburg, Russia Founded in 1764 by Catherine the Great, Hermitage is one of the largest and oldest museums in the world. Its collections, of which only a small part is on permanent display, houses over three million items including the largest collection of paintings in the world. It features works by author such as Renoir, Monet, Van Gogh, Velázquez, Michelangelo and Goya. 17 Oscar Niemeyer Museum – Curitiba, Brazil Inaugurated in 2002, this super-modern museum focuses on visual arts, architecture and design. It is also known as the Museum of the Eye, due to the distinctive design of the building. 16 Museum of Islamic Art – Doha, Qatar Established in 2008, it is one of the youngest museums on this list. It houses a collection of works gathered since the late 1980s, including manuscripts, textiles and ceramics and boasts of one of the world’s most complete collections of Islamic artifacts. 15 Louvre Museum – Paris, France Located on the right bank of the river Seine, Louvre is the world’s most visited museum. In 2012, it received almost 10 million visitors who admired unique exhibits spreading over an area of more than 650,000 square feet. 14 Potala Palace – Lhasa, Tibet Built at an altitude of 12,100 feet on the side of Marpo Ri in the center of Lhasa Valley, Potala Palace has been the chief residence of the Dalai Lama but it recently also started to serve as a museum of Chinese history and culture. The monumental building consists of thirteen stories, containing over 1,000 rooms, 10,000 shrines and about 200,000 statues. [...]
Views: 90035 list25
Understanding and Appreciating Art
 
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Michelle Marder Kamhi’s new book "Who Says That’s Art" presents a “commonsense view” of the visual arts that owes much to Ayn Rand’s understanding of the essential nature of art. Yet Rand’s idiosyncratic pronouncements about particular works of art, and about individual responses to them, have sometimes proved a stumbling block to full appreciation either of her theory of art, on one hand, or of the rich diversity of the world’s art, on the other. Drawing on material covered in the book, Kamhi shows how Rand’s fundamental insights can contribute to a broader understanding and enjoyment of visual art. Independent scholar and critic Michelle Marder Kamhi is the author of "Who Says That’s Art? A Commonsense View of the Visual Arts" (Pro Arte Books, 2014) and co-author of "What Art Is: The Esthetic Theory of Ayn Rand"(Open Court, 2000). She co-edits Aristos (An Online Review of the Arts) with her husband and colleague Louis Torres, who founded Aristos in 1982 as a print journal inspired by Rand’s theory of art. Articles by Kamhi have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Art Education, Arts Education Policy Review, and the Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, among other publications. For more information, see her website at www.mmkamhi.com.
Views: 2872 Atlas Society
The Art and Artifice of Poetry | Hamza Yusuf & Scott Crider
 
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"The poet is the priest of the invisible." - Wallace Stevens Hamza Yusuf and Scott Crider meet at Zaytuna College in Berkeley, California to explore the function and finer details of poetry in our time. Scott F. Crider is a professor of English at the University of Dallas, Constantin College of Liberal Arts. He has published extensively on the works of William Shakespeare and maintains the English Renaissance as one of his major research interests. His other academic interests include ancient and modern rhetorical tradition, the history and character of liberal education, and the English-language Bible as literature. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside. Hamza Yusuf is a leading proponent of classical learning in Islam. He is president of Zaytuna College, and has taught courses on Islamic jurisprudence, ethics, astronomy, logic, theology, prophetic biography, and hadith, as well as other subjects. He has published numerous articles and translations, including The Prayer of the Oppressed and Purification of the Heart. He also serves as vice president for the Forum for Promoting Peace in Muslim Societies, an international initiative that seeks to address the root causes that can lead to radicalism and militancy.
Urbino - The Light of Italy: Federico da Montefeltro - Extra History
 
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Federico da Montefeltro shone brightly as the "Light of Italy," one of many torches that helped light the flame of Renaissance. He made his name as a wily yet honest mercenary captain, but he also ruled as prince of the small, remote town of Urbino. There, he and his wife built an illustrious court that celebrated creativity, knowledge, and justice. Support us on Patreon! http://bit.ly/EHPatreon --- (Episode details below) Grab your Extra Credits gear at the store! http://bit.ly/ExtraStore Subscribe for new episodes every Saturday! http://bit.ly/SubToEC Learn about the disastrous Macartney Embassy that tried and failed to improve British trade relations with China: http://bit.ly/28Ro4B1 Play games with us on Extra Play! http://bit.ly/WatchEXP Talk to us on Twitter (@ExtraCreditz): http://bit.ly/ECTweet Follow us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/ECFBPage Get our list of recommended games on Steam: http://bit.ly/ECCurator ____________ Born an illegitimate son, Federico da Montefeltro became the heir of Urbino when his family got the Pope to legitimize him. As a child, he was sent to Venice to serve as a hostage for his family's part in the wars of Lombardy, and by 15 he had turned his fate around to become knighted by the Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund. At 16, he became a condotierre, a mercenary. Although he was technically prince of Urbino, his land was isolated and poor, so mercenary service allowed him to make money. He excelled at it: he never lost and never broke a contract. Cities began paying him NOT to fight against them, and he channeled their riches into his hometown. He looked after his soldiers families in Urbino, walked the markets every day, and held court in his garden where all citizens were treated equally under the law. Since he loved history and philosophy, he built one of the greatest libraries in all of Italy, hiring scribes to find and copy classical works that might have been lost if not for him. He also built a palace where he fostered art of all kinds, and young people from noble houses across the continent flocked to his court. His wife, especially his second wife Battista Sforza, built Urbino alongside him. She'd received the same liberal education he had and often counseled him on politics When he was away, she held court in his stead. Sadly, she died of complications while bearing Federico's only son, whom he named Guidobaldo. Guidobaldo was intelligent and well read, but he was sickly and could never be his father's equal in war. After Federico died, the Borgia came and seized Urbino from Guidobaldo, but although his family lost its holdings, his legacy lived on as the ideas and attitudes he'd nurtured in his court survived and spread far enough to help spur the beginning of the Renaissance in Italy. ____________ ♪ Get the intro music here! http://bit.ly/1EQA5N7 *Music by Demetori: http://bit.ly/1AaJG4H ♪ Get the outro music here! http://bit.ly/23isQfx *Music by Sean and Dean Kiner: http://bit.ly/1WdBhnm
Views: 1009719 Extra Credits
VR in Art Education Panel Discussion inside Engage   March 1st 2019
 
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Recording of the #CPDinVR Panel Discussion on March 1st 2019. Joining me for a discussion of VR in Art Education were Jesse Damiani (VR Scout), Joel Kremer (The Kremer Collection) and Sidra Iqbal (JESS Dubai). Visit Virtualiteach.com to read a short article that accompanies this recording. ** Subscribe to my channel to get more great content related to AR and VR in education. ** - You can read my VR Education articles on VR Focus here - https://www.vrfocus.com/author/steve-bambury - Visit my website https://www.virtualiteach.com/ for stacks of AR/VR in education articles and more. - Follow me on Twitter and Instagram via @steve_bambury
Views: 177 Steve Bambury AR VR
How Long Was The Renaissance?
 
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Faq's renaissance community loan fund. The renaissance was a period in european history, from the 14th to 17th century, regarded has long and complex historiography, and, line with general scepticism of discrete periodizations, there been much italian (italian rinascimento [rina i mento]) earliest manifestation renaissance, great cultural change achievement that began italy during century (trecento) lasted until (seicento), marking transition between late 19 jul 2017 high. Encyclopedia articles history of the renaissance in europe a rebirth, renewal, rediscovery. Present yourself to safety services personnel at the festival 14 jan 2017 noah will need continue his renaissance if he wants hold on starting job. How long did the renaissance period last? Sparknotes italian (1330 1550) general summary. How long or difficult would the walk be from renaissance to new york times. Kyle o'quinn, once looked at as an afterthought in the. Whistler blackcomb renaissance is a $345 million investment planned over three phases that will add year round attractions, on mountain winter and summer the textual scrutiny applied by humanists to ancient texts had revolutionary long term significance when combined with demands for religious costumes swords daggers are permitted as they properly sheathed peace tied. How long will noah's renaissance last? . Renaissance program requires a minimum 2. General information colorado renaissance festival. Renaissance facts, information, pictures italian renaissance wikipediadefinition, meaning, & facts. Whistler blackcomb announces renaissance long term strategic looking at the legacy of. Encyclopedia articles renaissance wikipedia en. Venice and milan also grew wealthy powerful, playing large roles in italian politics attracting 25 mar 2017 renaissance humanism was an intellectual movement which a tag to push together range of thought writing into one term find out more about the history renaissance, including videos, patrons such as florence's medici family sponsored projects small, twelfth century has long been heralded turning point european he wants make it clear historians that their era 23 feb following are main factors, favor idea famous part simply climax long, ever developing providence downtown hotel, 'how or difficult would walk be from '. During that time period, a modern way of thinking occurred with advances in art, science and short summary 's italian renaissance (1330 1550). High renaissance art, which flourished for about 35 years, from the early 1490s to 1527, when rome was sacked by imperial troops, revolved around three towering figures leonardo da vinci (1452 1519), michelangelo (1475 1564), and raphael (1483 1520) get information, facts, pictures at encyclopedia. Renaissance facts & summary history. Wikipedia wiki renaissance url? Q webcache. How long and how great was the twelfth century? The causes of renaissance a guide thoughtco. Renaissance facts, information, pictures. Googleusercontent search. Check
Views: 8 Bun Bun 1
Luther and the Protestant Reformation: Crash Course World History #218
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Protestant Reformation. Prior to the Protestant Reformation, pretty much everyone in Europe was a Roman Catholic. Not to get all great man, but Martin Luther changed all that. Martin Luther didn't like the corruption he saw in the church, especially the sale of indulgences, so he left the church and started his own. And it caught on! And it really did kind of change the world. The changes increased literacy and education, and some even say the Protestant Reformation was the beginning of Capitalism in Europe. Get the new Crash Course World History Character poster here: http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-characters-poster You can directly support Crash Course at https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content.
Views: 3407541 CrashCourse
Art History - 14. The High Renaissance in Italy - Flashcards
 
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http://xelve.com Art History - 14. The High Renaissance in Italy - Flashcards Learn Art History at http://xelve.com
Views: 229 Xelve
Love the Art, Hate the Artist
 
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Can you separate the art from the artist? This one's In honor of all the art you used to love, and it's creators who ruined it by behaving badly. We talk Picasso, Nanette, cats out of bags, and much more. To support our channel, visit: http://www.patreon.com/artassignment. Thanks to our Grandmasters of the Arts Vincent Apa and Indianapolis Homes Realty, and all of our patrons, especially Bronze Bond, Patrick Hanna, M12 Studio, and Constance Urist. Subscribe for new episodes of The Art Assignment every other Thursday! -- Follow us elsewhere for the full Art Assignment experience: Tumblr: http://theartassignment.com Response Tumblr: http://all.theartassignment.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/artassignment Instagram: http://instagram.com/theartassignment/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theartassignment and don't forget Reddit!: http://www.reddit.com/r/TheArtAssignment
Views: 268415 The Art Assignment
Mathematics and art | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematics_and_art 00:03:50 1 Origins: from ancient Greece to the Renaissance 00:04:02 1.1 Polykleitos's iCanon/i and isymmetria/i 00:06:31 1.2 Perspective and proportion 00:14:17 1.3 Golden ratio 00:17:25 1.4 Planar symmetries 00:22:03 1.5 Polyhedra 00:24:43 1.6 Fractal dimensions 00:26:13 2 A complex relationship 00:27:13 2.1 Mathematics as an art 00:28:40 2.2 Mathematical tools for art 00:32:43 2.3 From mathematics to art 00:42:28 2.4 Illustrating mathematics 00:46:37 2.5 Analysis of art history 00:49:18 2.6 Stimuli to mathematical research 00:50:27 2.7 Illusion to Op art 00:51:14 2.8 Sacred geometry 00:53:31 3 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7368906418635149 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mathematics and art are related in a variety of ways. Mathematics has itself been described as an art motivated by beauty. Mathematics can be discerned in arts such as music, dance, painting, architecture, sculpture, and textiles. This article focuses, however, on mathematics in the visual arts. Mathematics and art have a long historical relationship. Artists have used mathematics since the 4th century BC when the Greek sculptor Polykleitos wrote his Canon, prescribing proportions based on the ratio 1:√2 for the ideal male nude. Persistent popular claims have been made for the use of the golden ratio in ancient art and architecture, without reliable evidence. In the Italian Renaissance, Luca Pacioli wrote the influential treatise De Divina Proportione (1509), illustrated with woodcuts by Leonardo da Vinci, on the use of the golden ratio in art. Another Italian painter, Piero della Francesca, developed Euclid's ideas on perspective in treatises such as De Prospectiva Pingendi, and in his paintings. The engraver Albrecht Dürer made many references to mathematics in his work Melencolia I. In modern times, the graphic artist M. C. Escher made intensive use of tessellation and hyperbolic geometry, with the help of the mathematician H. S. M. Coxeter, while the De Stijl movement led by Theo van Doesburg and Piet Mondrian explicitly embraced geometrical forms. Mathematics has inspired textile arts such as quilting, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery, weaving, Turkish and other carpet-making, as well as kilim. In Islamic art, symmetries are evident in forms as varied as Persian girih and Moroccan zellige tilework, Mughal jali pierced stone screens, and widespread muqarnas vaulting. Mathematics has directly influenced art with conceptual tools such as linear perspective, the analysis of symmetry, and mathematical objects such as polyhedra and the Möbius strip. Magnus Wenninger creates colourful stellated polyhedra, originally as models for teaching. Mathematical concepts such as recursion and logical paradox can be seen in paintings by Rene Magritte and in engravings by M. C. Escher. Computer art often makes use of fractals including the Mandelbrot set, and sometimes explores other mathematical objects such as cellular automata. Controversially, the artist David Hockney has argued that artists from the Renaissance onwards made use of the camera lucida to draw precise representations of scenes; the architect Philip Steadman similarly argued that Vermeer used the camera obscura in his distinctively observed paintings. Other relationships include the algorithmic analysis of artworks by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, the finding that traditional batiks from different regions of Java have distinct fractal dimensions, and stimuli to mathematics research, especially Filippo Brunelleschi's theory of perspective, which eventually led to Girard Desargues's projective geometry. A persistent view, based ultimately on the Pythagorean notion of harmony in music, holds that everything was arranged by Number, that God is the geometer of the world, and that therefore the world's ...
Views: 10 wikipedia tts
The Pecking Secret | A Short Film |
 
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Join us on the journey that begins with a curious note of the great Renaissance painter, Leonardo Da Vinci, in the 1400s, and concludes with the advanced 3D simulations and high-speed imagery in 2012. It's a journey through time, through history itself to unravel a secret that has been kept hidden for so long. A Scrivial Media Production Film, Scrivial | Group & Media Holdings Original short Featurette ©. All Rights Reserved®. Check out our website for more amazing articles : http://www.scrivial.com Give your feedback here and help us to improve! http://www.scrivial.com/videos.html Subscribe for more such videos Visit us at : http://www.scrivial.com Like our page at : http://www.facebook.com/Scrivial Follow us at : https://twitter.com/Scrivial & at http://google.com/+ScrivialGroup © 2018 Scrivial Group & Media Holdings.
Views: 12210 Scrivial
TAOLB Comments: Justice Renaissance
 
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Participating artists talk about their experience with taking part in The Art of Living Black (TAOLB) art exhibit. TAOLB is a yearly art exhibit held at the Richmond Art Center, Richmond, California. Artists were interviewed in 2006 and asked about their experiance with TAOLB, their first memory of being inspired and about the inspiration for an art work. The YouTube TAOLB group is located at:: http://www.youtube.com/group/TAOLB I'm working on making a documentary about Inspiration. I'd love to see any of your comments and stories about inspiration. Perhaps some of the posts could be used in the documentary. The project website with quotes, discussions, articles, paintings, definitions, etc. about inspiration is located at: http://www.humanityquest.com/themes/inspiration
Views: 156 Edwin Rutsch
Florentine Renaissance
 
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Production: SCAD Media, LLC http://www.scad-media.com HSP Summer 2013 The Renaissance begins in Italy and is an invention of the Florentines. This seminar is an examination of the art, architecture, sculpture, literature, and history of the republic of Florence during its period of greatest importance to world history. From the mid-14th to the late 15th century, Florence was the center of a cultural movement that has become the definition of the modern world. We will begin by examining the first glimmerings in the frescoes of Giotto, the literary works of Petrarch and Boccaccio, the sculptural work of Donatello and Ghiberti, and the architecture and engineering of Brunelleschi. We will study the dynamics of the network of thinkers at the court of Lorenzo de'Medici, including Poliziano, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, and Botticelli. As artistic experimentation with anatomy, musculature, and linear perspective accelerate throughout the 15th century, we will follow the work of the great artists Fra Angelico, Verrochio, Pollaiuolo, and others, and we will study Benozzo Gozzoli's frescoes in the Medici-Ricardi Palace. We will also follow the fortunes of the republic of Florence in its ups and downs, including the 1478 Pazzi Conspiracy and the career of Savonarola. Through these political upheavals the cultural expressions of Florence still triumph in the High Renaissance masterpieces of Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo. We will read Machiavelli's Prince, and examine Mannerism in the work of Rosso Fiorentino, Parmigianino, Pontormo, and Bronzino. Reading brief selections from the period, we will have occasion to consider Lorenzo de' Medici's songs, the role of St. Francis of Assisi, the sonnets of Michelangelo, Petrarch's letter to Dionisio da Borgo San Sepolcro, Machiavelli's letter to Francesco Vettori, and the mathematical and philosophical musings of Leonardo da Vinci. Using all these works, we will try to come to a deeper understanding of the key role played by Florence and its unique culture in initiating a new period of human history, one characterized by observation, rigorous craftsmanship, experimentation, resistance to authority (but respect for the ancients), and an abiding belief that man is the measure of all things. There may be one book on Florentine Renaissance art (to be named later),and some brief selections from these texts: Vasari, Lives of the Artists. Boccaccio, Decameron. Castiglione, The Book of the Courtier Machiavelli, The Prince Galileo, Sidereus Nuncius. Richard Poss is an Associate Professor in Astronomy and former Director of the Humanities Program at the University of Arizona. His research examines the role of astronomical themes in European poetry, and he has published articles on Petrarch, Dante, Veronica Gambara, Walt Whitman, and on the exploration of Mars. He teaches courses on the history of astronomy and the relations between astronomy and the arts, and is a frequent instructor in the Humanities Seminars program. He is co-founder of the popular lecture series "Astrobiology and the Sacred: Implications of Life Beyond Earth," sponsored by a grant from the Templeton Foundation. He has won a variety of major university teaching awards, including the UA Foundation Leicester and Kathryn Sherrill Creative Teaching Award, the Provost's General Education Teaching Award, and several Humanities Seminars Superior Teaching Awards.
Views: 2540 UA Humanities
Grove Art Online, the authority on art from pre-history to present day
 
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Grove Art Online is the foremost scholarly art encyclopedia, covering both Western and non-Western art. http://www.oxfordartonline.com First published as the landmark 34-volume Dictionary of Art, edited by Jane Turner, the content of Grove Art encompasses all aspects of visual culture. It features articles about topics as varied as Fauvism and Frida Kahlo, bibliographies for further research, and thousands of searchable images made available through Oxford's partnerships with museums, galleries, and other outstanding arts organizations. Grove Art Online is a living resource, with scholars and specialists from around the world continually reviewing and updating existing content and contributing new articles. In addition to the vast number of entries on the visual arts, Grove Art features a host of exceptional learning resources that organize the content for use in art and art history classrooms, making Grove Art an essential source for scholars and students alike.
Florence | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Florence 00:01:38 1 History 00:03:23 1.1 Roman origins 00:04:43 1.2 Second millennium 00:05:57 1.3 Middle Ages and Renaissance 00:06:06 1.3.1 Rise of the Medici 00:08:09 1.3.2 Savonarola, Machiavelli, and the Medici Popes 00:09:54 1.4 18th and 19th centuries 00:11:32 1.5 20th century 00:13:50 1.6 21st century 00:14:11 2 Geography 00:14:34 2.1 Climate 00:15:21 3 Government 00:17:01 4 Main sights 00:21:07 4.1 Monuments, museums and religious buildings 00:27:34 4.2 Squares, streets and parks 00:29:21 5 Demographics 00:31:19 6 Economy 00:32:12 6.1 Industry, commerce and services 00:33:46 6.2 Tourism 00:36:30 6.3 Food and wine production 00:37:19 7 Culture 00:37:28 7.1 Art 00:42:40 7.2 Language 00:43:31 7.3 Literature 00:45:24 7.4 Music 00:47:43 7.5 Cinema 00:48:12 7.6 Cuisine 00:49:38 7.7 Research activity 00:50:02 7.8 Science and discovery 00:51:03 7.9 Fashion 00:52:19 7.10 Historical evocations 00:52:27 7.10.1 iScoppio del Carro/i 00:53:10 7.10.2 iCalcio Storico/i 00:54:19 7.11 Sport 00:55:43 8 Transportation 00:55:52 8.1 Cars 00:56:30 8.2 Buses 00:57:58 8.3 Trams 00:58:49 8.4 Florence public transport statistics 00:59:28 8.5 Railway station 01:00:36 8.6 Airport 01:00:57 9 International relations 01:01:06 9.1 Twin towns and sister cities 01:01:17 10 Other partnerships 01:01:26 11 Notable residents 01:04:18 12 In popular culture 01:04:34 13 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9651561680892118 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Florence ( FLORR-ənss; Italian: Firenze [fiˈrɛntse] (listen)) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany. It is the most populous city in Tuscany, with 383,084 inhabitants in 2013, and over 1,520,000 in its metropolitan area.Florence was a centre of medieval European trade and finance and one of the wealthiest cities of that era. It is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called "the Athens of the Middle Ages". A turbulent political history includes periods of rule by the powerful Medici family and numerous religious and republican revolutions. From 1865 to 1871 the city was the capital of the recently established Kingdom of Italy. The Florentine dialect forms the base of Standard Italian and it became the language of culture throughout Italy due to the prestige of the masterpieces by Dante Alighieri, Petrarch, Giovanni Boccaccio, Niccolò Machiavelli and Francesco Guicciardini. The city attracts millions of tourists each year, and the Historic Centre of Florence was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1982. The city is noted for its culture, Renaissance art and architecture and monuments. The city also contains numerous museums and art galleries, such as the Uffizi Gallery and the Palazzo Pitti, and still exerts an influence in the fields of art, culture and politics. Due to Florence's artistic and architectural heritage, it has been ranked by Forbes as one of the most beautiful cities in the world.Florence is an important city in Italian fashion, being ranked in the top 15 fashion capitals of the world; furthermore, it is a major national economic centre, as well as a tourist and industrial hub. In 2008, the city had the 17th highest average income in Italy.
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