Home
Search results “Arctic oil resources”
Arctic oil and gas reserves
 
01:30
Environmental groups filed a lawsuit against energy-rich Norway on Tuesday to stop oil drilling in the Barents Sea. Videographic about the vast resources of oil and gas lie hidden beneath the Arctic Ocean.VIDEOGRAPHIC
Views: 1547 AFP news agency
Cold Rush. Drilling For Oil Amid Arctic Ice
 
23:00
In 2014 Russia became the world’s first producer of Arctic Oil or ARCO. The Prirazlomnaya platform on the Russian Shelf above the Arctic Circle, operates round the clock to extract the oil. The “Kirill Lavrov” is one of two giant tankers that ferry the black gold to land. The platform is constantly expanding, putting down new bore holes. Once extracted the oil must be carefully analysed to ensure the quality is consistent. So scientists aboard the platform never stop, from their own laboratory on the rig, they make sure the oil always meets the highest standards. Everything that happens out here is scrutinised and practiced to perfection. The man-made island has 2 search and rescue teams who practice regularly emergency drills to keep the crew safe and to respond swiftly in the unthinkable event of an oil spill. They take safety seriously, both personal and ecological, the engineers take great pride in the fact that not a drop of oil has been spilt since the rig came into operation. The Prirazlomnaya’s numbers around 200 people who work day and night in extremely harsh conditions. The shift patterns mean that they spend every other month away from their families. It certainly takes strength of character to do this job. RT Doc visits the rig to meet the people of Russia’s first Arctic oil platform, including the only woman aboard, to find out more about the process of producing ARCO safely. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/rt_documentary/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
Views: 371878 RT Documentary
Russia's big Arctic oil ambitions
 
02:34
CNN's Phil Black reports on Russia's big plans to exploit the Arctic's natural resources.
Views: 22306 CNN
Oil and gas reserves in the Arctic
 
02:00
An oil spill in the Russian Arctic has affected an area of up to 8,000 square metres after workers tried to open an old well. The Arctic is a vast repository of untapped oil and gas reserves.
Views: 9218 AFP news agency
Russia New Arctic Base Sits On $35 Trillion Oil Reserves
 
00:59
Russia's new military base holds a key strategic position in the oil-rich Arctic. Subscribe to Vocativ: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=vocativvideo Find us everywhere else: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Vocativ Twitter: https://twitter.com/vocativ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vocativ/ Snapchat: http://www.snapchat.com/add/vocativ Website: http://www.vocativ.com Vocativ explores the nexus of media and technology, where science meets storytelling. We use proprietary technology to examine the uncharted space of the Deep Web, covering topics that are vital to our changing world. Follow us for more!
Views: 3575 Vocativ
The new cold war: The race for Arctic oil and gas - Counting the Cost
 
25:01
The Arctic, which is believed to contain as much as one-quarter of the world's undiscovered oil is part of a massive territorial dispute. The United States, Russia, Canada, Denmark, Norway and Iceland are all laying claim to the area, with each country eager to tap into the oil, 30 percent of the earth's natural gas and resources such as diamonds, gold and iron. In August, Russia submitted a bid to the UN claiming a territory thought to hold $30 trillion worth of oil and gas. Meanwhile, Canada has been scrambling to defend its territory against the US arguing that it is sovereign Canadian water, not an international waterway. Amid the Arctic land grab, Iceland has also seized the opportunity for exploration. Vanishing at 13 percent a decade, the melting ice is expected to make drilling, mining and shipping easier. Gunnar Bragi Sveinsson, Iceland's Foreign Minister joins Counting the Cost to discuss Iceland's plans for the Arctic and protecting the region from climate change. ISIL's toll on Turkey's economy Turkey's economy is on a worrisome course with it's local stock market and currency continuing to decline. Hit by political uncertainty, unable to form a coalition government and becoming ever more involved in the chaos in neighbouring Syria, Turkey's economy has been dealt a series of blows. Just a few years ago, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his AK party were almost unstoppable, both politically and economically. Erhan Aslanoglu, a Professor at Marmara University joins the programme to discuss Ankara's economic downturn. Opal Mining Takes Off in Ethiopia The Ethiopian highlands are often called "the roof of Africa". A rugged, breathtakingly beautiful landscape, the discovery of opals in recent years has got precious gem experts around the world excited. The industry currently generates around $25m a year and has led to Ethiopia being ranked among the five fastest growing economies in the world. Al Jazeera's Charles Stratford went to the Wollo district in the country's northeast, an area generating a lot of interest among gemstone experts. Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AJEnglish Find us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Check our website http://www.aljazeera.com/At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 9896 Al Jazeera English
Economic race to extract Arctic resources
 
02:34
Some estimates suggest the Arctic holds around 13 percent of the world's undiscovered oil reserves and almost a third of its gas. That means great economic potential for the five different countries which claim territorial rights - Canada, Denmark, Norway Russia and the US. However, oil prices need to be around $80 per barrel to make production viable and environmental concerns are also expected to impact on drilling prospects. Al Jazeera's Erica Wood reports.
Views: 1745 Al Jazeera English
Stop Arctic Drilling Cold – Keep Oil Under the Sea
 
01:39
The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world and as the ice melts, previously inaccessible oil and gas resources become less difficult to exploit. But that doesn’t mean we should start drilling. And there’s more than one reason why. The Obama Administration is expected to release its final decision on a five-year leasing program for Arctic drilling in November. The time to act is now.
Views: 10903 World Wildlife Fund
How Did So Much Oil Get Trapped Under The Ocean?
 
04:41
What is oil even made of? Here's how fossil fuels form in the ocean and how scientists know where to find it. How Uranium Becomes Nuclear Fuel - http://dne.ws/1zANhcb Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: The Mysterious Origin And Supply Of Oil http://www.livescience.com/9404-mysterious-origin-supply-oil.html "It runs modern society and fuels serious political tension. But where does oil really come from, and how much is left? The far-out possibilities might surprise you. Nature has been transmuting dead life into black gold for millions of years using little more than heat, pressure and time, scientists tell us." Why Is Oil Usually Found In Deserts And Arctic Areas? http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-is-oil-usually-found/ "Plate tectonics determines the location of oil and gas reservoirs and is the best key we have to understanding why deserts and arctic areas seem to hold the largest hydrocarbon reserves on earth. But there are other important locations of large reserves: river deltas and continental margins offshore. Together, these four types of areas hold most of the oil and gas in the world today." Stanford Scientists Discover How Pangea Helped Make Coal http://news.stanford.edu/2016/01/22/coal-formation-pangea-012216/ "The same geologic forces that helped stitch the supercontinent Pangea together also helped form the ancient coal beds that powered the Industrial Revolution." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI
Views: 223976 Seeker
► Ice Race - Border Conflicts about OIL (FULL DOCUMENTARY)
 
49:00
The Arctic is an area with massive reserves that are extremely important for billions of people – but with unclear borderlines. History has shown us that this is an extremely dangerous situation. “Border Conflict” explains that the borders in the Arctic are disputed and have not been finally determined despite the fact that they have been defined in accordance with international criteria. Zoia Vylka Ravna is a member of the indigenous Nenets people, but she has lived away from the Russian tundra for a long time. She is now returning to her homeland in the far north of Russia where she becomes witness to the fact that her people’s traditional grazing grounds have been invaded by a new industry. Like the members of many other indigenous groups around the Polar basin she feels as though she has been robbed and forgotten. Will the countries in the north comply with international regulations while a desperate hunt for energy resource is taking place? Will it be possible to share this area without any military conflicts arising – and will the exploitation of natural resources be able to occur peacefully? In the final episode of the series “Ice Race” we stand at an important and dangerous crossroads in our search for more oil and gas. Because even though we are starting to use new sources of energy, the world will be dependent on petroleum activities for many decades to come. Despite numerous expeditions, our knowledge about the seas around the North Pole is still almost non-existent. The sovereigny of the countries around the polar basin only extends for 200 nautical miles. The remaining polar areas are administered by the UN. The race to find oil and gas in the Arctic Ocean has meant that it is therefore even more important for the five Arctic countries, i.e. USA, Russia, Canada, Norway and Denmark, to secure more of the polar basin. All these countries are therefore fighting intensely over what are sometimes overlapping border claims. These claims extend all the way to the outer limits of the continental shelf, i.e. the shallow waters off these countries’ coasts. If the new race culminates in predatory activities and major conflict, the indigenous populations could become the first and greatest loosers!
Views: 35067 Free Documentary
Oil and Gas in the Arctic
 
01:02:44
The February 2014 London Lecture was by Alastair Fraser (Imperial College). In overcoming the technical challenges of oil production in the Arctic, are we making the most of a strategic resource or heading for an environmental and political minefield? The vast Arctic region is probably the last remaining unexplored source of hydrocarbons on the planet. Harnessing the considerable resources of the 'Final Frontier' is going to be fraught with many technical, political and environmental challenges that will engage many minds, both scientific and political over the next half century.
Views: 1292 GeologicalSociety
Arctic Oil and Gas Drilling
 
02:27:27
This movie is part of public domain. Info: House Natural Resources - Arctic Oil and Gas Drilling - 175464-1-DVD - House Committee on Natural Resources. Witnesses testified about energy resources in Alaska. Discussion focused on the costs and benefits of drilling for oil in certain wilderness areas. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information, see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/175464-1 Downloaded from https://archive.org
Views: 4 Public Domain
Acquiring and Developing Arctic Resources: Challenges and Prospects
 
01:18:30
Specialists maintain that nearly 20 percent of the world’s oil and natural gas resources are attributed to the Arctic shelf. The acquisition of these petroleum reserves in the North Pole, however, are accompanied by significant operational costs and high risk. This discussion will address the challenges to bring projects to fruition, including the newest technologies for developing the Arctic shelf, while lowering operational risks and ensuring ecological safety? Moderator: Tatyana Naumova, TV Host, Russia 24 Participants: Alexander Chaadaev, Vice-President on Innovations, ALROSA OJSC; Director, Yakutniproalmaz Institute Artur Chilingarov, President, State Polar Academy; Special Representative of President of the Russian Federation on International Cooperation in the Arctic and Antarctic; Member of the Board of Directors, ROSNEFT Vyacheslav Pershukov, Deputy Chief Executive Officer for Innovation Management, ROSATOM Boris Rozman, General Director, Indel-Partner, LLC Anatoly Zolotukhin, Professor, Counsellor, International affairs, Research Director, Institute of Arctic Petroleum Technology, Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas Expert: Arild Vollan, Managing Partner, ARCTIC DEVELOPMENT AS http://www.forinnovations.org/forum/program/147/
Views: 76 Open Innovations
It's time to draw borders on the Arctic Ocean
 
12:50
Why Russia wants to own the North Pole. Follow Johnny to stay up to date: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/johnnywharris Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnnyharrisvox Vox Borders Episodes: 1. Haiti and the Dominican Republic ( https://youtu.be/4WvKeYuwifc) 2. The Arctic & Russia (https://youtu.be/Wx_2SVm9Jgo) 3. Japan & North Korea (https://youtu.be/qBfyIQbxXPs) 4. Mexico & Guatemala (https://youtu.be/1xbt0ACMbiA) 5. Nepal & The Himalaya (https://youtu.be/ECch2g1_6PQ) 6. Spain & Morocco (https://youtu.be/LY_Yiu2U2Ts) The ice in the Arctic is disappearing. Melting Arctic ice means new economic opportunities: trade routes in the Arctic ocean, and access to natural resources. Because of this, the Arctic nations are now moving to expand their border claims. Russia has shown that it’s the most ambitious, using a potent combination of soft power and military buildup to advance its agenda. They’ve said the Arctic is rightfully theirs. Check out more arctic maps from IBRU, Durham University, UK: http://www.durham.ac.uk/ibru/resources/arctic / Vox Borders is a new international documentary series presented by Emmy-nominated videojournalist Johnny Harris. For this series, Johnny is producing six 10-15 minute documentaries about different borders stories from around the world.
Views: 2145111 Vox
Oil and Gas researcher Carl Larry on Arctic oil drilling
 
03:10
CCTV America's Mike Walter spoke to Carl Larry, who is the director of Oil and Gas for Frost and Sullivan.
Views: 167 CGTN America
The New Cold War: Who Owns Arctic Oil?
 
02:50
Zero Line with Dr. Kent Moors The New Cold War: Russia vs U.S.A. - Who Owns Arctic Oil? http://zerolinekentmoors.com/media/new-cold-war-who-owns-arctic-oil/ The Arctic represents only 6% of the Earth's surface, yet it contains 20% of the world's undiscovered oil and natural gas -- this amounts to approximately 412 billion barrels of energy worth some $10.5 trillion. Needless to say, countries all over the northern hemisphere are fighting over who owns the Arctic oil. Who Owns the Arctic Oil However, no fewer than seven countries believe they have a legitimate stake to the Arctic and its resources, such as oil, and this will eventually pit the United States against Russia in a battle to win control of Arctic oil. Moreover, rising temperatures and melting Arctic ice are altering the political reality in the far north. In the span of a decade, the Arctic has gone from being considered a 'global common' to a hotly contested economic goldmine. So, Who Owns the Arctic Oil? In a special intelligence briefing that accompanies Dr. Kent Moors' "Great Game Blueprint" (available free to viewers), Moors discusses how this dispute over Arctic oil will evolve and how this situation is ultimately connected to the Great Game, the global resource war worth $20 trillion a year. He also reveals the two companies perfectly positioned to win this new cold war between the U.S. and Russia -- and reward investors who act now... Players of the Great Game: Countries who want to own the Arctic Oil: countries that want to own the Arctic Oil Russia: Russian National Security Council revealed that Moscow expects the Arctic to become its' primary resource base by 2020. The United States: American interests in the region include limiting Russian economic and military expansion into the area Canada: Canadian geography allows for a potentially large claim on the Arctic shelf Denmark: Denmark is advancing claims to certain islands in the Arctic Archipelago west of Greenland that are also claimed by Canada Norway: The Norwegian claim is dominated by a dispute with Russia over how to demarcate their mutual border in the Barents Sea, home to an estimated 11 billion barrels of arctic oil China: China has extended its Arctic lobbying to include Canada, another Arctic state
Views: 2522 Money Morning
Could Arctic Resources Ignite a War?
 
17:43
Arctic Cold War (2007): The Arctic's melting ice has opened up the area's vast natural resources to the Arctic powers, which could result in tensions leading to war For downloads and more information visit http://journeyman.tv/57670/short-films/arctic-cold-war.html According to a new report, global warming is likely to trigger a dangerous contest between Russia and the West for the Arctic's vast mineral resources. As the Arctic warms up; "major corporations are waking up to the fact there is going to be tremendous economic opportunity", explains Prof Huebert. Canada, Russia, Denmark and Norway all have claims to the Arctic seabed, where vast mineral reserves are thought to lie. There's concern that this scramble for resources could spiral out of control. "The worst case scenario is one of a regional area where hostilities are the norm and co-operation the exception", warns Huebert. ABC Australia - Ref. 3679 Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world's most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world's top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you'll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.
Views: 31891 Journeyman Pictures
Arctic Oil and Gas Development Senator Murkowski Keynote
 
17:21
The oil and gas resources of the Arctic region represent one of the most promising, largely untapped hydrocarbon resources in the world. A 2008 U.S. Geological Survey study estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Arctic region at 90 billion barrels, about 13 percent of the world?s remaining oil resources and the gas resource at 1,670 trillion cubic feet, about 30 percent of the world?s remaining gas resource. These oil and gas resources are located throughout the Arctic region and each of the five Arctic nations has prospective areas.
► Ice Race - Into the Unknown - the Story of the ARCTIC (FULL DOCUMENTARY)
 
49:00
Oil and gas are the very blood of our modern industrial society and our last major reserves are to be found in the Arctic. The lives of practically everyone on earth would be different if we did not have oil and gas. Our reserves will soon become depleted, apart from in the Arctic. Our episode entitled “Entering Virgin Territory” explains the dramatic energy situation. How would this impact on the vulnerable Arctic environment and the indigenous populations living in the area? Should Arctic considerations take precedence over the living standards of the rest of the world? The situation is most dramatic in the USA. This superpower will soon have no major oil wells left. The country is currently consuming three times as much oil as it produces and it is paying sky-high prices throughout the world to secure access to this black gold. The northernmost town in the USA, Barrow, lies in the middle of an area which is believed to contain Alaska’s richest oil reserves. The local Eskimo population lives mainly off the area’s natural land and sea resources, and an indomitable will to survive. They are now directing their energy towards the oil industry that wants to establish activities in the area. As the Polar ice starts to melt the oil industry is dreaming about making major oil and gas finds in this more or less untouched territory. The violent conflicts and wars that are taking place in some of the world’s most affluent oil states are adding further fuel to these dreams. But who should be entitled to extract future oil and gas reserves in the Arctic? Where do the borders run in this icy territory? History has shown us that this is an extremely dangerous situation. Because will a world that is becoming increasingly more dependent on oil respect national borders, historic territorial claims and be able to resolve border conflicts in an amicable manner? In our fourth and final programme, “Border Conflict”, we show how the new race in the Arctic is creating new borders and new conflicts.
Views: 60936 Free Documentary
Siberia's Oil Squeeze | Sanctions, economics hammer Russia’s petro heartland
 
09:38
With the low price of oil and western sanctions, how will Russia cope with its oil crisis? Susan Ormiston travels to Western Siberia to find out. Click here for the full story: http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/sanctions-economic-woes-hammer-russia-s-oil-heartland-1.2969409 »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: https://www.youtube.com/user/CBCTheNational?sub_confirmation=1 Voice Your Opinion & Connect With Us Online: The National Updates on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thenational The National Updates on Twitter: https://twitter.com/CBCTheNational The National Updates on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CBCTheNational »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» The National is CBC Television's flagship news program. Airing seven days a week, the show delivers news, feature documentaries and analysis from some of Canada's leading journalists.
Views: 37317 CBC News: The National
Russia vs Canada: Race for Oil-Rich Arctic Seabed
 
03:32
Russia and Canada are neck and neck in a race for the Arctic's rich resources. Ottawa is challenging Moscow's claims to a portion of the polar seabed, but Russia says it won't give up.
Views: 36419 RT
New access to natural resources opening in Arctic
 
04:28
As the ice thins and melts, new areas are opening on both land and sea. In some places what were once brutally harsh weather, conditions are now not as bad. Gas and oil companies are moving in pitting many indigenous communities against their neighbors. CCTV America’s Sean Callebs reports from Point Hope, a community on the front lines of climate change. It’s all part of our series “On Thin Ice.”
Views: 248 CGTN America
Geopolitics of the Arctic
 
11:36
Support CaspianReport through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/CaspianReport Channel of Patrice: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCO-NZoGEzCE5klWUCZVDuWQ BAKU - The Arctic covers roughly 14 million square kilometers of water and solid ice. It’s almost the size of Antarctica. For most of its part, the region is inhospitable. In the summer, the weather can rise above the melting point, yet, in the winter, it can plunge down to minus 45 degrees Celsius. This situation, however, is not to last. In the coming decades, climate change will make the Arctic passages and resources become more accessible. Given the abundance of resources and critical trade routes, it should come as no surprise that the Arctic will turn into a new geopolitical flashpoint. Soundtrack: Decisions Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Be sure to follow CaspianReport on the social media. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/caspianreport Twitter: https://twitter.com/caspianreport LiveLeak: http://www.liveleak.com/c/caspianreport
Views: 137464 CaspianReport
China begins importing Russian natural gas from Arctic
 
02:14
With its crackdown on pollution, China is on track to become the world’s biggest importer of natural gas, a much cleaner energy alternative to coal. Fueling that rise in imports coming from above the Arctic Circle is a massive liquefied natural gas production facility in Russia.
Views: 35893 CGTN America
Oil and gas drilling in the Arctic.
 
01:29
. A federal judge in Alaska blocked plans on Wednesday for oil and gas drilling in the Arctic, ruling that the Interior Department did not adequately consider the proposal's environmental effects. Oil & Natural Gas Corp. India's biggest energy exploration company, may consider bidding jointly with Vietnam Oil & Gas Group for partner BP Plc's stake in a natural gas field in Vietnam to secure fuel supplies. Santos Ltd., Australia's third- largest oil and gas producer, reported a 11 percent decline in second-quarter output as floods in central Australia disrupted operations in the Cooper Basin.
Views: 2453 TheMarinewaves
Sen. Murkowski: Arctic oil & gas and America's energy security
 
00:33
#OffshoreArctic Investment Briefing. Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) discusses the importance of developing Alaska’s offshore resources: “To forsake Arctic oil and gas would be to forsake America’s energy security in a world that is using more energy, not less. It will leave us at an economic and an environmental disadvantage. It will benefit the likes of nations like Iran and Saudi Arabia. It will result in fewer jobs created here at home, fewer dollars staying within our economy, less affordable energy for our families and businesses, and less influence for our nation on the world stage.” Read more: http://arcticenergycenter.com/offshorearctic/
Heat over Arctic: 'Oil & gas may fuel militarization of the region'
 
04:47
As world powers team up to secure the ecology in the Arctic, the rivalry over its rich oil and gas resources is heating up. Michel Chossudovsky from the Center for Research on Globalisation explains that the battle for the North Pole is high on the global military agenda. READ MORE: http://on.rt.com/mmwv92 RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 9861 RT
Russia Arctic military base: Arctic Trefoil military base strengthens strategic ambitions- TomoNews
 
05:40
ALEXANDRA LAND, RUSSIA — Russia’s Defence Ministry has released a “virtual tour” of the country's new Arctic military base. The Arkticheskiy Trilistnik or “Arctic Trefoil” base has been built on the Russian territory of Alexandra Land, an island in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. The 14,000 sqm base is built on stilts, which are designed to help it withstand extreme cold weather that can reach as low as minus 40 degrees Celsius. The base will house 150 personnel on a 18-month period of duty. The main components of the base remain top-secret but the Russian military said the facility is equipped with a clinic, library, chapel, gym and cinema, according to BBC News. Military experts said the new base will help Russia to control international shipping on the Northern Sea Route and protect the country’s oil and gas resources in the Arctic. Russia is building four more military bases in the Arctic region. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Crying dog breaks the internet’s heart — but this sad dog story has a happy ending" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4prKTN9bYQc -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 59163 TomoNews US
Polar Rivalry: States crave slice of Arctic oil & gas pie
 
04:27
The untouched beauty of the Arctic may soon be a thing of the past. Many nations are craving to get their hands on the vast resources hidden beneath the ice, which is rapidly melting away. Russia's convened the third international Arctic forum, hoping to draw attention to the region's ecological security. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 4784 RT
Arctic Oil and Gas Development Frances Ulmer Keynote
 
41:04
The oil and gas resources of the Arctic region represent one of the most promising, largely untapped hydrocarbon resources in the world. A 2008 U.S. Geological Survey study estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Arctic region at 90 billion barrels, about 13 percent of the world's remaining oil resources and the gas resource at 1,670 tillion cubic feet, about 30 percent of the world's remaining gas resource. These oil and gas resources are located throughout the Arctic region and each of the five Arctic nations has prospective areas.
Cold Competition: Race for Arctic resources heats up as gas reserves discovered
 
04:46
With vast gas reserves discovered in the Russian Far North, the race for resources on top of the world is heating up. And as RT's Marina Portnaya reports relations between countries with claims on the Arctic are quickly going on ice. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 8817 RT
Scrambling for the Arctic
 
02:37
An international summit has begun in Moscow, the Russian capital, to consider rival claims to mineral rights in the Arctic. It is thought a quarter of the world's undiscovered oil and gas resources lie beneath the arctic ocean, and now global warming is making it more accessible. Under the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, coastal nations can claim exclusive rights to natural resources on or beneath the sea floor up to 370 kilometres beyond their land territory. Al Jazeera's Tania Page reports.
Views: 13235 Al Jazeera English
Arctic Oil and Gas Development David Hayes Keynote
 
43:10
The oil and gas resources of the Arctic region represent one of the most promising, largely untapped hydrocarbon resources in the world. A 2008 U.S. Geological Survey study estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Arctic region at 90 billion barrels, about 13 percent of the world's remaining oil resources and the gas resource at 1,670 tillion cubic feet, about 30 percent of the world's remaining gas resource. These oil and gas resources are located throughout the Arctic region and each of the five Arctic nations has prospective areas.
Arctic Rivalry: Battle for North Pole oil sparks fears of '21st-century Cold War'
 
03:31
As the Arctic sea ice melts away at an alarming rate, access to vast oil reserves is opening up - and countries bordering the region are determined to defend their slice of the pie. The polar seabed may hold as much as 15 percent of the world's undiscovered oil - and 30 per cent of its gas. But as RT's Marina Portnaya found out, the battle for the region could take a dangerous turn. RT LIVE http://rt.com/on-air Subscribe to RT! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=RussiaToday Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTnews Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_com Follow us on Instagram http://instagram.com/rt Follow us on Google+ http://plus.google.com/+RT RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 1 billion YouTube views benchmark.
Views: 13582 RT
Russia to take half of Arctic oil by 2030
 
00:39
By 2030, Russia will take a half of Arctic oil. The World Petroleum Council said that oil production will increase to more than 2 million barrels per day in 15 years. All countries working on the Arctic shelf will be increasing oil output. Norway, Canada and the US will also increase production, although their volumes will not reach the level of one million barrels per day. According to the World Petroleum Council, Russia's main regions of Arctic oil production in 15 years will be the shelf of Sakhalin, Barents and Pechora Sea, as well as the Gulf of Ob and the Kara Sea shelf. Check more of our videos on our video channel http://www.youtube.com/user/PravdaTV Go to Pravda.Ru website to read articles that you can not read in Western publications http://english.pravda.ru/
Views: 3031 Pravda Report
Arctic Oil and Gas Development: Sentor Murkowski Keynote
 
17:21
The oil and gas resources of the Arctic region represent one of the most promising, largely untapped hydrocarbon resources in the world. A 2008 U.S. Geological Survey study estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Arctic region at 90 billion barrels, about 13 percent of the world?s remaining oil resources and the gas resource at 1,670 trillion cubic feet, about 30 percent of the world?s remaining gas resource. These oil and gas resources are located throughout the Arctic region and each of the five Arctic nations has prospective areas.
Sen. Murkowski: "Clear need" for Arctic oil & gas development
 
01:50
#OffshoreArctic Investment Briefing. Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) discusses the importance of developing Alaska’s offshore resources: “There is a clear need to allow the production of our Arctic resources to go forward."
Arctic Oil and Gas Development: Frances Ulmer Keynote
 
41:04
The oil and gas resources of the Arctic region represent one of the most promising, largely untapped hydrocarbon resources in the world. A 2008 U.S. Geological Survey study estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Arctic region at 90 billion barrels, about 13 percent of the worldapos;s remaining oil resources and the gas resource at 1,670 tillion cubic feet, about 30 percent of the worldapos;s remaining gas resource. These oil and gas resources are located throughout the Arctic region and each of the five Arctic nations has prospective areas.
Arctic Oil and Gas Drilling
 
02:27:27
Arctic Oil and Gas Drilling - 175464-1-DVD - House Natural Resources - 2003-03-12 - House Committee on Natural Resources. Witnesses testified about energy resources in Alaska. Discussion focused on the costs and benefits of drilling for oil in certain wilderness areas. Filmed by C-SPAN. Non-commercial use only. For more information, see http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/175464-1
Views: 179 HouseResourceOrg
Race for Riches: Will Arctic see battle over oil & gas?
 
04:58
A joint U.S.-Canadian expedition is set to kick off to map the Arctic ocean bed. A Russian exploration ship is already on its way to the polar waters. The three nations are gathering evidence in a bid to claim the immense energy resources of the region. The Arctic is believed to hold much of the world's untapped oil and gas reserves. RT talks to Edward Struzik, a Canadian researcher, to discuss the future of the region.
Views: 4229 RT
BBC Newsnight - Wikileaks Arctic Oil - Governments Pro-Global Warming
 
08:48
BBC Newsnight reports on fresh Wikileaks cables which show how countries are scrambling over the resources hidden under the melting Arctic ice - which is disappearing at unprecedented rates. Military tensions are escalating as politicans and countries look to carve out their stake.
Views: 2046 GlobalClimateNews
Arctic Oil and Gas Development: Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Hayes Keynote
 
43:10
The oil and gas resources of the Arctic region represent one of the most promising, largely untapped hydrocarbon resources in the world. A 2008 U.S. Geological Survey study estimated the recoverable oil resources of the Arctic region at 90 billion barrels, about 13 percent of the worldapos;s remaining oil resources and the gas resource at 1,670 tillion cubic feet, about 30 percent of the worldapos;s remaining gas resource. These oil and gas resources are located throughout the Arctic region and each of the five Arctic nations has prospective areas.
What Are The Natural Resources In The Arctic Region?
 
00:46
"What Are The Natural Resources In The Arctic Region? What are three natural resources found in this region? The mineral resources include major reserves of oil and natural gas, large quantities of minerals including iron ore, copper, nickle, zinc phosphates and diamonds. Living resources of the Arctic are primarily the abundant fisheries. What raw materials are found in the Arctic? The Arctic has plenty of raw materials. With the world's increasing need for a number of raw materials – energy, such as oil and gas; minerals, such as copper, zinc and iron; and, in particular, rare earths (which, for example, are used in mobile phones) – the Arctic and Greenland become increasingly interesting."
Views: 404 Hadassah Hartman
Oil Barons of the World Target North Pole
 
04:34
The oil barons of the world - and the militaries that rely on that oil - are seeing new opportunities in the North Pole as global climate change kicks into high gear. Warming weather is leading to the Northern ice cap melting - uncovering a treasure trove of oil and natural gas reserves. Scientists believe that the Arctic is storing 13% of the world's untapped oil - and nearly a third of the world's undiscovered natural gas. As the ice melts - access to these resources becomes easier and shipping lanes open - so now Northern nations are scrambling to stake out their chunk of Arctic resources as well as running military operations in the area should they have to fight for these resources in the not too distant future. In fact - two months ago - military leaders from the United States, Canada, Russia, Iceland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Finland met to discuss security issues around the Arctic. But shouldn't these nations have the exact opposite approach to disappearing ice in the Arctic? Why are we looking for more fossil fuels to burn while we're watching our world melt from fossil-fuel induced climate change? Dan Howells joins me now - he is the Deputy Campaigns Director for Greenpeace USA.
Views: 892 The Big Picture RT
Oil Giants Eye Arctic Reserves; Environmentalists Urge Moratorium
 
03:24
As oil giant Shell calls a temporary halt to its exploration activities in the Arctic over safety concerns, lawmakers in Britain are urging international governments to seek a moratorium on offshore drilling in the region. Environmentalists say an oil spill could cause catastrophic, irreversible damage. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA that with global demand set to rise, though, some say it's time to look at 'unconventional resources'.
Views: 503 VOA News
BP and Russia's Rosneft sign Arctic oil deal
 
01:32
http://www.timesofearth.com/ LONDON -- BP has signed a joint venture with Russia's state-controlled energy giant Rosneft to explore for offshore oil and gas and in a deal that gives the UK company access to areas of the Arctic previously reserved for Russian companies. The British energy giant will swap five per cent of its shares, valued at $7.8bn, for 9.5 per cent of Rosneft in an agreement that immediately raised concerns about US economic security from US politicians and criticism from environmentalists. The deal covers huge areas of the South Kara Sea in the Arctic that BP, which is still recovering from the financial impact of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, said could contain billions of barrels of oil and gas. The companies will explore three areas, known as EPNZ 1, 2 and 3, located on the Russian Arctic continental shelf and covering an area of 125,000 square kilometres. The government of Vladimir Putin, the prime minister, has pledged to ease investors' access into Russia as it looks to foreigners to play a key role in helping to modernise the economy - including through taking part in a big privatisation drive starting this year. BP is seen as filling a skills and technology gap for Rosneft as it seeks to develop the region. "Rosneft is well aware that its ability to do deepwater Arctic work alone is very limited," Cliff Kupchan, a director at Eurasia Group, a global political risk consultancy based in Washington, said. "They have been looking for ways to bring in companies with the technology and especially management skills needed to pull off deepwater Arctic work." Edward Markey, a US congressman who is the senior Democrat on the House Natural Resources Committee, immediately called for a review of the deal by US regulators to see whether it affects the national and economic security of the US. He noted that in 2009 BP was the top petroleum supplier to the US military. Michael Burgess, a Republican congressman who is on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, also said the deal "deserves some analysis and scrutiny" by the government's Committee on Foreign Investment in the US given BP's ownership of critical oil assets in the US. The US Treasury said it is forbidden by law to comment on investigations, planned or under way, by the committee. Environmentalists also raised concerns about the deal. "Now BP has bought its way into the Arctic by the back door," Charlie Kronick of Greenpeace said. "It seems the company learned nothing last year in the Gulf of Mexico." However, Chris Huhne, the UK secretary of state for energy and climate change, welcomed the "groundbreaking" deal and called it "good news for Europe, for the UK's energy security and worldwide." The venture underscores Europe's dependence on Russia for a rising share of its energy needs - particularly for clean-burning natural gas. Russia holds one-fifth of the world's reserves of natural gas. Friday's deal highlights a rebound in relations with Moscow both for BP and Bob Dudley, its chief executive, who was forced to leave Russia in 2008 after heading BP's Russian joint venture, TNK-BP, which is half-owned by BP. Dudley said the deal, announced late on Friday, was the first significant cross-shareholding between a nationally owned oil company and an international oil company and called it "a new template for how business can be done in our industry". Dudley had been the boss for TNK-BP's formation in 2003 and was forced to leave due to what he described as a campaign of harassment by BP-TNK's billionaire oligarch co-owners. The issue has since been resolved and Dudley returned to Moscow for the first time this summer, following his appointment as CEO of BP. "It has turned from a fistfight into a lovefest," Kupchan said. BP has a market capitalisation of $150bn, while Rosneft is valued at about $83bn.
Climate Change Clears The Way For The Extraction of Arctic Resources
 
06:45
Canada and Russia are investing in military infrastructure in order to protect economic interests in Arctic energy resources See more videos: http://therealnews.com
Views: 5833 The Real News Network
Who Owns The Arctic Ocean?
 
06:21
#ArcticOcean #Geography #Education This video discusses who owns the ever-warming Arctic Ocean, which surrounds the North Pole of Earth. Find out how as the Arctic melts, it opens up new possibilities for fishing, drilling and shipping. But who owns the Arctic? And who gets access to these resources? Discover how Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) dictate the delegation of natural resources in the Arctic Ocean, and how the United Nations Convention on the Law of Sea (UNCLOS) can create more disputes than answers when countries have overlapping territorial claims in the Arctic Circle. Continental shelf claims in the Arctic Ocean also bring a new layer of complexity to territorial disputes. Sources: NASA for lots of footage and animations (public domain) Copenhagen Business School Report: https://services-webdav.cbs.dk/doc/CBS.dk/Arctic%20Shipping%20-%20Commercial%20Opportunities%20and%20Challenges.pdf Durham University Map of Arctic: https://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/ibru/resources/Arcticmap04-08-15.pdf CIA World Factbook: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/xq.html Join me on Twitter!: https://twitter.com/TicketToKnow
Views: 588 Ticket To Know
Fran Ulmer: After the Arctic Ice Melts
 
01:00:40
Sea ice in the Arctic is getting thinner and thinner each year. As the ice melts away, shipping lanes will expand and create new opportunities for ships to use faster and more direct routes. Beyond international trade, countries are eager to start development projects and gain access to natural resources. We can see that warmer temperatures will increase activity in the Arctic, but we should also consider what this activity entails. Competition and conflict may arise as countries eye this region. No other nation is more prepared for polar enterprises and protecting untapped natural resources than Russia. The US is also interested in this region for its oil reserves, though this has concerned Canada due to environmental factors. These three nations, along with Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, are all part of the Arctic Council. This governing body is responsible for ensuring the region is safe by encouraging nations to reduce gas emissions and protecting biodiversity. However, it seems these goals will be more challenging as the Arctic becomes more accessible. How will member states of the Arctic ensure the region remains safe? Should we expect a period of greater uncertainty as countries and companies increase their presence and vie for space in the Arctic? In terms of the value of untapped natural resources, will development projects allow countries like Russia to gain a stronger foothold in the world? The Honorable Fran Ulmer, Chair of the US Arctic Research Commission and current Visiting Professor at Stanford's School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences, joins us for a discussion on the challenges facing the Arctic region. SPEAKER: Fran Ulmer Chair, United States Arctic Research Commission MODERATOR: Craig Miller Science Editor, KQED For more information about this event please visit: http://worldaffairs.org/events/event/1843 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WorldAffairsCouncil/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/world_affairs Website: http://www.worldaffairs.org
Views: 21963 World Affairs